Search results for "santa monica"

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For Better or Wearstler

Kelly Wearstler helps turn 1920s building into Santa Monica Proper Hotel
Prolific Los Angeles-based interior designer Kelly Wearstler adapts a 1928 Arthur E. Harvey–designed building into a new 271 room luxury hotel. Located in Santa Monica’s downtown core, the new locale features Spanish and Moorish details that accentuate the historic building’s original Spanish Colonial Revival architecture. Check out the rest of the project on our new interiors site, aninteriormag.com.
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The Center of May

Leong Leong and KFA finish new campus for the Los Angeles LGBT Center
Leong Leong and Killefer Flammang Architects (KFA) have finished the first phase Anita May Rosenstein Campus, a series of spaces for the Los Angeles LGBT Center. The 72,000-square-foot project in Hollywood, California, occupies nearly a full block and will house a variety of social services for LGBT youth, seniors, and general community. The three-story buildings are an aggregation of white and glass blocks irregularly stacked and carved by swooping curves. Anamorphic projections were used to create oval patterns in the fritted glass surfaces that appear as circles from certain vantage points in the area. Picking up on local Southern California building traditions, a series of courtyards and covered walkways open up the structures and bring the outside in. The new campus includes a youth center, a senior center, events spaces, 100 beds for homeless youth, the Ariadne Getty Foundation Youth Academy, retail and administrative spaces, along with an observation deck looking toward the Hollywood sign.
“The Center’s leaders gave KFA and Leong Leong a clear vision: that the design of the new Anita May Rosenstein Campus must reflect the boldness, optimism, and absolute certainty of the Center’s mission to care for, champion, and celebrate LGBT individuals and families,” said KFA Partner Barbara Flammang, AIA, in a statement. Dominic Leong, AIA, founding partner of Leong Leong said in a statement: “It is a symbol and an intersectional platform for social progress forged by the Los Angeles LGBT Center and comes at a moment when this progress must be relentlessly supported and sustained."
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OMA Heads West

Jason Long and Shohei Shigematsu plot inventive works across California

Although the Office of Metropolitan Architecture (OMA) has been in business for decades and keeps a steadily growing constellation of offices around the globe, the firm has, until recently, had a relatively modest profile on the American West Coast.

But things are changing. As West Coast cities pursue new building efforts—including new neighborhoods, ecologically sensitive public parks, and experiments in multiuse complexes—OMA’s brand of frank intellectualism has slowly found a preliminary foothold in California.

The firm’s expanding Golden State presence includes a recently completed urban master plan for Facebook’s Willowbrook campus in Menlo Park, a residential condominium tower in San Francisco, as well as a trio of inventive projects in Los Angeles. Over the next few years, these projects are poised to join the Seattle Central Library and the Prada Epicenter Los Angeles, both from 2004, OMA’s only completed West Coast projects to date.

The latest westward push represents an ascendant energy emanating from the firm’s New York office, where OMA partners Jason Long and Shohei Shigematsu lead many dynamic projects taking shape across the continent and in Japan. When asked if a new California outpost was in the works for OMA, Shigematsu replied, “It’s always been a dream of ours,” before adding that current conditions were favorable but not exactly right for a potential OMA West branch. “Maybe if we get more projects out here.”

First and Broadway Park (FAB Park)

Also created in collaboration with Studio-MLA, the new First and Broadway Park in Los Angeles is set to contain a playful 100,000-square-foot retail, food, and cultural programming pavilion that anchors the ecologically sensitive park. The pavilion will be capped with an edible rooftop garden and a dining terrace that overlooks L.A.’s City Hall.

Along the ground, the park will be wrapped with ribbons of bench seating, elements fashioned to create interlocking outdoor rooms and plazas surrounded by native oak and sycamore trees. Water-absorbing landscapes around the seating areas are designed to harvest and retain rainwater while solar collection and a “Golden California” landscape lend the project its ecological bona fides.

The Avery (Transbay Block 8)

Related California’s crenelated 575-foot tower, known as The Avery, is part of a larger development created in conjunction with Fougeron Architecture for a blank site in downtown San Francisco’s bustling Transbay District.

For the project, the designers have carved a generous paseo through the buildable envelope for the site, creating a new retail and amenity plaza while also lending a tapered look to the 55-story tower. The gesture animates views for a collection of condominiums, market-rate apartments, and affordable housing units while also bringing sunlight down into the paseo and to the mid-rise block designed by Fougeron. Currently under construction, the tower is expected to open in 2019.

Audrey Irmas Pavilion

The Audrey Irmas Pavilion is the firm’s first cultural and religious project in the region. The trapezoidal building shares a site with the Wilshire Boulevard Temple and is made up of three interlocking volumes that connect to the outdoors via a sunken rooftop garden designed by landscape architecture firm Studio-MLA. An arched portal connects to a shared breezeway between the pavilion and the temple, which is framed by the leaning pavilion. The latter was designed with a pronounced slant both out of deference to historical structure and to illuminate the courtyard.

Referencing unbuilt proposals for Universal City and the L.A. County Museum of Art, Rem Koolhaas, OMA cofounder, said, “[The Pavilion] is part of a very consistent effort to do things here. It’s exciting if one thing happens to succeed, because architecture is a very complex profession where maybe a quarter of all attempts get anywhere.”

The Plaza at Santa Monica

Shigematsu explains that one concern driving the firm’s California projects involves delving into the region’s rich history of indoor-outdoor living. The approach is fully on display in The Plaza at Santa Monica, a 500,000-square-foot staggered mass of interlocking buildings intended to create a new mix of public outdoor spaces.

With a cultural venue embedded in the heart of the complex and ancillary indoor and outdoor public spaces laid out across building terraces, the complex aims for a unique take on the regional indoor-outdoor typology. The building is set to contain offices, a 225-suite hotel, as well as a market hall and public ice-skating rink.

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All Work, All Play

Gehry to design new office headquarters for Warner Bros. in Los Angeles
Gehry Partners, Worthe Real Estate Group, and Stockbridge Real Estate Fund have unveiled renderings for a new 800,000-square-foot office complex slated for the Warner Bros. studio campus in Burbank, California. Urbanize.LA reported that the developers behind the so-called "Second Century Project” aim to break ground later this year and that the project will be completed in time for Warner Bros.’ centennial celebrations in 2023. Plans for the complex call for a pair of cool, iceberg-like mid-rise office towers articulated in Frank Gehry’s signature fluted and twisted forms. One tower will rise seven stories and is set to contain 355,000 square feet of offices while the second tower will rise nine stories high and offer 450,000 square feet of office space. In a press release announcing the project, Gehry said, “Once upon a time, Hollywood Studios had an important architectural presence in the city—they were like monuments to the movie-making process. With this project, I was trying to recapture that feeling of old Hollywood splendor.” To achieve his goal, Gehry Partners has created a two-faced complex. For the more public exposure that faces an adjacent freeway, the architects have designed icy glass facades that will catch the sunlight. Renderings for the project show the towers ablaze in Southern California’s red-orange-pink golden hour light, for example. The office’s second main exposure, which the architects have wrapped in perforated metal panels, will face existing warehouse-like studio spaces. Gehry added, “We created large open floorplates with the single goal of creating the highest quality office space. From the freeway, the buildings are composed as one long sculptural glass facade that creates a single identity like icebergs floating along the freeway. On the studio side, the metal punched facade is terraced to relate to the scale and character of the existing studio buildings.” The project is the latest local proposal from the ever-busy Gehry Partners. Other projects on deck include the Youth Orchestra of Los Angeles project in South Los Angeles, a planned hotel and mixed-income housing complex in Santa Monica, the controversial 8150 Sunset mixed-use complex, and The Grand, a pair of mixed-use residential towers slated for a site directly across the street from Gehry Partners’ Walt Disney Concert Hall in Downtown Los Angeles, among others.
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Starry Night

MARC FORNES / THEVERYMANY splashes this parking garage with swirling colors
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The parking garage is a starkly utilitarian typology that has been an unlikely subject for some of the world's highest-profile architects; everyone from Frank Gehry to Herzog and de Meuron has tried their hands at a high-design car park. Now, New York–based computational design and digital fabrication studio MARC FORNES / THEVERYMANY has brought a designer parking garage to Charlotte, North Carolina, with Wanderwall, an exterior parkade wall of fluorescent aluminum. The blue-green aluminum screen spans eight stories; its pattern—reminiscent of Van Gogh's Starry Night—takes on a dreamy quality as it courses across the east and south elevations of the structure. According to MARC FORNES / THEVERMANY, the facade's design evokes Charlotte's status as the second largest financial center in the nation; the aluminum sheets are punctuated by a network of nodes strung together by a web of striations passing over waves of diagonal ridges.
  • Architects MARC FORNES / THEVERYMANY
  • Engineer LaufsED
  • Location Charlotte, North Carolina
  • Date of Completion March 2019
  • System Unitized aluminum screen wall
  • Products Computationally-designed color treated aluminum screen wall
The thickness of the aluminum screen is 1/8 inch while the depth of the overall surface reaches up to 16 inches at certain moments. Light passing through nodes and striations of the facade, which is reminiscent of an Arabic mashrabiya window oriel with its complex geometrical latticework, casts varied shadow patterns on the otherwise drab interior concrete walls and flooring. Additionally, the folds of the aluminum reflect sunlight to create a glowing fog of light. Although composed of 5,768 individual aluminum pieces, the facade is draped over the structure as a continuous piece without the backing of a secondary structure and is attached directly to the main concrete structure. "There is no discrete secondary structure, but rather, the facade is a unified system which provides both structural depth, enclosure, and a graphic signal at the urban scale" said MARC FORNES / THEVERYMANY, "it is composed out of labyrinthine stripes, a continuous diagonal underlayer, and custom brackets—all made out of cut and folded aluminum. No one part works independently—only in collaboration with the other parts." The pattern of the facade emerges from the flow of dramatic colors through a rational grid. "The overall motif is derived from computational flows, captured at one moment in the simulation," said the design team. "Those resulting curves are approximated through sets of non-linear, labyrinthine stripes. Coloration is applied in relation to the 'viscosity' of the initial flows." While this is one of MARC FORNES / THEVERYMANY's larger projects, the design team noted that the scaling up of the ultra-thin aluminum system the firm has used in smaller projects was easier than anticipated. Lessons learned from past permanent projects—such as engineering techniques and workflows—serving as an effective guide. Marc Fornes will be presenting a detailed dive into Wanderwall at Facades+ Charlotte on March 19.
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Let’s Build

UCLA launches the country's first intensive affordable housing development course
The University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Ziman Center for Real Estate has launched a unique affordable housing development program geared toward sharing some of the most innovative approaches in the field with housing professionals. The executive course, a partnership between school administration and private donors, consists of an intensive three-week program that brings together professors in urban planning and real estate, UCLA M.Arch I graduates, and interested students to develop conceptual proposals for affordable housing projects in Los Angeles. The program—developed by Ziman Center professor of finance Stuart Gabriel, UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs lecturer in urban planning Joan Ling, CityLAB UCLA director Dana Cuff, and others—takes students through the exercise of designing, permitting, and funding their projects with the goal of instilling a “curriculum-based” approach to affordable housing development, according to Ziman Center founding executive director Tim Kawahara. Most of the students in the program are working professionals who are already engaged with the world of affordable housing development in some form, Kawahara explained, but are looking to expand and enrich their current knowledge. Kawahara said that because many of the professionals working in affordable housing have fallen into the field unexpectedly or work for self-taught non-profit housing developers, there is something of a gap in terms of shared, industry-wide knowledge. That’s where the university's deep bench of housing policy- and development-focused professors is stepping in to create a formalized approach to help affordable projects come to life. “The affordable housing crisis in California has reached an untenable level,” Kawahara said. “We have been doing a lot of teaching in the affordable housing space and wanted to find a way to help address the crisis, so we said, ‘Lets do a university-based executive program that will help deliver as many affordable housing and middle income and units as possible.’” The program’s inaugural class has been a smash success. After planning for an introductory cohort of roughly two dozen students, the Ziman Center received over 140 applications for the program. The university is now looking at ways of expanding the reach of the program, either by raising additional funding to hold the course more often throughout the year or by transforming the curriculum into a syndicated learning package that can be taken up by other universities. Word of the program even reached the California State Legislature, which has asked Ziman Center to give a version of the class to interested lawmakers. Organizers hope that more projects like the Little Berkeley development by CityLAB-affiliated Kevin Daly Architects come to life as a result of the program. The award-winning eight-unit project organizes residences in a staggered arrangement on a tight urban lot in Santa Monica and uses oddly-shaped interstitual spaces to provide outdoor access for residents. With California working to allocate tens of billions of dollars in new funding for affordable, supportive, and transitional housing projects, timing for the course and its much-needed curriculum is on the organizers’ side. Across the state, efforts are being made at all levels of governance to bring new funding sources and other incentives to affordable housing developments, while many California cities, including Los Angeles and San Francisco, have instituted so-called linkage fees that require market-rate developers to include subsidized units in their developments. California’s new governor is working to enact a robust pro-housing agenda that aims to deliver up to 3.5 million units in less than a decade. Perhaps not unexpectedly given this momentum, Kawahara, sees affordable housing as a “growth industry” that might even have the potential to fare better than others if the economy takes a much-predicted downturn. With increasing levels of funding for these projects and political interest in the housing crisis only growing, it’s possible that a sizable percentage of the state’s new housing could come from affordable development initiatives. There’s even room to grow, because despite the prodigious growth in housing incentives and funding for certain targeted groups, “We still have a low- and middle-income housing affordability problem,” Kawahara said. 
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X-treme Construction

Extreme architecture: The great lengths (and heights) of high design
Throughout history, many great works of architecture both large and small have been made possible only through incredible feats of engineering and construction. In today’s world—where office and residential towers reach ever-increasing heights, new cities appear in an instant, and stringent safety and structural requirements make building arduous and time-consuming—architects must draw on their experience and know-how to bring innovative new projects to life. Three recent projects by American architecture firms highlight the lengths designers can go (and heights they can achieve) in pursuit of great design. Seattle Space Needle Olson Kundig The Space Needle in Seattle is a superlative building through and through. Built in 1962, the flying saucer-shaped observation tower was recently renovated by Olson Kundig and a daring team of contractors and engineers, including Hoffman Construction, Arup, Fives Lund, and Magnusson Klemencic Associates. To achieve their goal of modernizing the structure, the project team had to work delicately to make sure the weight of added and subtracted materials balanced out, while also ensuring that the majority of the new components could be transported up the needle’s two passenger elevators. Beyond these exacting specifications, crews also dealt with a job site located some 500 feet up in the air as they worked to install new panes of glass around the Space Needle’s flying saucer-shaped Top House. For the project, Hoffman and associated contractors erected a giant covered platform directly underneath the Top House to stage construction activities. The massive structure was lifted into the sky and built out from key hoist points, according to Bob Vincent, project manager at Hoffman. The platform, designed to function more or less like an oil rig deck, was used to stage construction so that workers could access the Space Needle’s Top House from below. The stage created something akin to a massive cocoon around the base of the Top House, and its associated enclosure kept workers protected from the elements. Vincent said, “With the full enclosure, the workers weren’t freezing and materials didn’t fly around too much. It kept wind and elements out, too. When we were done with the project, we dismantled the ring by bringing in all the components from the edges toward the middle.” Embassy in Chad Moore Ruble Yudell Architects A new American embassy campus in N’Djamena, Chad, by Santa Monica, California–based Moore Ruble Yudell (MRY) posed a different set of construction and site limitations. Located in a remote region of the country with a small pool of skilled labor, it fell on the design team to create a state-of-the-art building that could be constructed using locally available materials and building techniques. The approach for the technically complex and decidedly low-tech project was to blend simple finishes and off-the-shelf components with the aim of creating lively but humble buildings. The complex was erected using site-poured concrete walls and modular roof pieces, elements that helped meet the strict security and functional requirements for the embassy. The cementitious walls were then wrapped in exterior rainscreen paneling made up of thin-shell concrete and metal latticework. The lightweight panels, available in standard sizes that could be shipped easily to the site, were chosen to add color and patterning to the pragmatic buildings. In certain areas, including between the main lobby and the cafe, lightweight canopies were strung to create shaded outdoor areas and to collect rainwater. A new, centralized energy plant connected to solar panel arrays was also included in the off-the-grid project. Alexander Residence Mark English Architects While working on extensive renovations to an existing five-story cliffside home in the San Francisco Bay, Mark English Architects (MEA) was only able to deliver construction materials and remove debris via floating barge. With the closest road nearly 200 feet away from the waterfront home and accessible only by steep stairs and a cable car funicular, the design and construction team had to rent several barges to undertake the project. Located on the bayside face of Sausalito, MEA’s Alexander Residence is conceived of as a getaway spot for a client with an extensive art and furniture collection. For the renovation, MEA and GFDS Engineers worked to open up the 1970s-era home by removing some of the unnecessary interior partitions that marked its original pinwheel design. Along the lowest level, for example, facing the house’s private dock, a closed-off bedroom and living area were combined to create a studio apartment. Farther up, a home office, living room, and kitchen were united to form a great room–style arrangement with an elevated dining room, pass-through kitchen, and living area oriented around multimillion-dollar views of downtown San Francisco, Angel Island, and Alcatraz. “We rebuilt the house from inside out,” principal Mark English explained. “Everything we demoed, including the roofing, old doors and windows, and drywall, had to go out through the dock by barge.” The same was true for all of the replacement materials coming in, including new lengths of structural steel that were added for seismic resiliency and to transfer loads over some of the new window openings. For these elements, the contractors added a crane to the barge that was then used to lift the steel beams into place. English added, “We talked to two or three builders before settling on Landmark Builders. The others would inevitably bring up how difficult and expensive it would be to do this project. Luckily, we eventually found someone who thought it would be interesting to take on this out-of-the-ordinary project.”
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Google Shop

Google plans move into Los Angeles's Westside Pavilion mall building
Google will be moving to the building currently known as the Westside Pavilion shopping mall in West Los Angeles. Last week Hudson Pacific Properties and Santa Monica, California–based real estate investment company Macerich announced that the tech company would move into One Westside, as the property is known, after a substantial renovation. Gensler was tapped to convert the mall into 584,000 square foot of state-of-the-art office space, and the redesigned structure will include terraces, flexible interior layouts, and folding glass walls to connect the inside to out. This is not Google's first site in the Los Angeles area. The company recently moved into a large timber warehouse in Playa Vista and maintains branches in Venice and Irvine. Gensler has plenty of experience in this arena, having done numerous office spaces for tech companies, including a home for NVIDIA in Santa Clara, California, that won a 2018 Best of Design Award. One Westside has a prime location thanks to Los Angeles's ever-expanding public transit network, with the Expo Line light rail’s Westwood/Rancho Park station a five-minute walk away. The renovation is scheduled to be finished in 2022 when Google will begin a 14-year lease.
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Factory-Built

California is embracing prefab architecture with innovation, talent, and investment
With a long history of mass-produced housing experiments going back to the 1920s Sears, Roebuck & Co. mail-order homes, and the post–World War II suburban mass- housing experiments, California has a rich legacy of prefab hits—and misses. In recent years, a new generation of builders has arrived on the scene seeking to surpass this legacy by exploiting emerging mass-customization techniques and new technologies to streamline production. But these aren’t your grandparents’ prefab units. The days of rigid space-age designs are long gone, replaced by new designs that instead focus on diverse aesthetics and material flexibility. These new designs tend toward a pervasive adaptability that not only bolsters their widespread appeal but also helps builders meet the onerous local design restrictions that define many California communities. LivingHomes, based in Santa Monica, California, offers a variety of factory-made designs for single- and multifamily units, including models designed by prominent architects and firms such as Yves Béhar, Ray Kappe, and KieranTimberlake. LivingHomes’ designs are built by its spinout firm, Plant Prefab, which focuses on construction and assembly. Founder and CEO Steve Glenn is hoping Plant Prefab will lead the way in creating a national network of home-building factories where “homes are built like airplanes” rather than as one-off works, as is currently the case. Plant Prefab bills itself as the nation’s first sustainably minded home factory, and recently garnered a $6.7 million investment from Amazon, which is looking to expand the market for the company’s Alexa smart home technologies. Seattle-based Blokable, on the other hand, pursues vertically-integrated projects with the help of their in-house development team’s business model, which seeks to treat “housing development as a service.” By controlling planning, design, and production, Blokable is able to offer turnkey development services for local nonprofits and other housing providers at a lower cost. The firm offers standardized building systems along with customizable windows, doors, and finishes in order to meet a variety of price points. Blokable has begun the development process for a 64-unit housing complex in Edmonds, Washington. The project is a partnership between Blokable, the City of Edmonds, and the nonprofit Compass Housing Alliance. At the smaller end of the building scale, Gardena, California–based Cover is working to boost the availability of backyard Accessory Dwelling Units (ADUs) in Los Angeles. Owing to a 2016 state law that legalized these backyard structures, Cover has developed unique zoning analysis software that can give potential clients a view of what type of ADU they can build. Cover offers sleek custom designs and uses its own modular building systems, fabricating units in a new factory in southern L.A. County. While many of these outfits are relatively new, legacy prefab designers are also making strides. Office of Mobile Design (OMD) principal Jennifer Siegal has been working at the intersection of portable architecture and housing for over two decades, pioneering a distinct approach to modular design that is flexible enough to include additions to existing buildings, as well as develop modular commercial structures. Siegal recently partnered with builder Bevyhouse and premium kitchen designer Tortoise to develop her own line of prefab ADU models and is also currently working on a modular design for the Sanderling Waldorf School in Carlsbad, California. If OMD’s continued experiments in non-housing prefab building types are any indication, factory-made structures of all types could soon make their way off the assembly line and to a community near you.
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Fans of Pomo

Venturi, Scott Brown's Sainsbury Wing wins the 2019 AIA Twenty-five Year Award
After awarding no building the prestigious Twenty-five Year Award in 2018, a first since the prize’s founding in 1971, the AIA has changed its tune for 2019. The 2019 award has been bestowed upon the Venturi, Scott Brown and Associates (VSBA)–designed Sainsbury Wing addition to London’s National Gallery. The Twenty-five Year Award was created to honor buildings that have “set a precedent for the last 25-35 years and continues to set standards of excellence for its architectural design and significance.” Additionally, buildings must be in good shape and still represent the original design intent. The Sainsbury Wing, a 120,000-square-foot addition to the 1838 National Gallery, was completed in 1991 and originally drew a mixture of scorn from both traditionalists and modernists who felt the scheme was trying to have the best of both worlds. As Adam Nathaniel Furman noted in an essay on the building’s convoluted history, VSBA used Postmodernism as a way to thread the needle between opposing demands. Clad in a large, unifying facade but containing a delicately-balanced and intimate set of galleries within, the Sainsbury Wing feels both new and old at once. In 2018 the addition was awarded Grade I preservation listing status, the highest level of recognition in the UK. The decision to recognize the Sainsbury Wing this year is likely in deference to the late Robert Venturi; the building falls well within the 1983-through-1993 range that the jury was considering last year. This isn’t the first time the AIA has recognized the Sainsbury Wing though, as it was awarded a National Award in 1992. The 2019 jury included Jeanne Chen, AIA, Chair, Moore Ruble Yudell Architects & Planners (Santa Monica, California): Rania Alomar, AIA, RA-DA (West Hollywood, California): Alicia Berg, AICP, University of Chicago (Chicago): Raymond M. Bowman, Assoc. AIA (Pittsburgh): Katherine K. Chia, FAIA, Desai Chia Architecture PC (New York City): Shannon R. Christensen, AIA, CTA Architects Engineers (Billings, Montana): Eugene C. Dunwody Jr., AIA, Dunwody/ Beeland Architects (Macon, Georgia): Henry Moss, AIA, Bruner/Cott & Associates, Inc. (Cambridge, Massachusetts): and David Rosa-Rivera, Savannah College of Art and Design (Bayamón, Puerto Rico).
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MAD About Town

MAD Architects' first U.S. project is a luxurious pile of verdant homes
Beijing- and Santa Monica–based MAD Architects and developers Palisades are pushing forward with Gardenhouse, a mixed-use development set to become the firm's first completed project in the United States. Renderings featured on a project website and recently reported by Urbanize.LA, come as construction on the project moves at a steady clip ahead of a 2019 opening. The 18-unit mixed-use residential project is designed with ground floor retail and includes aluminum panel-clad "sky villas" that sit atop the building and feature pitched roofs. The complex will feature three distinct dwelling types, including a series of "garden flats" organized around a central courtyard and a collection of rowhouses, as well. The sky villas will also face toward the courtyard and are designed with living spaces oriented toward these outdoor spaces. Featuring double-height, vaulted ceilings and sculptural staircases connecting each of the floors, the units are arranged to take advantage of panoramic views over surrounding Beverly Hills. The decidedly high-end residences will also come outfitted with interiors and finishes designed by Rottet Studio and are set to include bespoke appliances by Miele and cabinets by Snaidero. The three-bedroom apartments sandwiched between the villas and retail portions of the project are designed, like the sky villas, with multiple outdoor spaces, including balconies and terraces that look down over the courtyard. The row-house component of the project will be attached to the backside of the building where the homes are able to meet the street. These two- and three-story units will feature individual addresses and will each come equipped with its own elevator and subterranean, three-car parking garage. The project is designed according to a design philosophy known as "shanshui" promoted by MAD Architects principal Ma Yansong. The philosophy, according to an interview with Yansong featured on the project website, "combines the functionality of urban density with the artistic idealization of natural landscape to compose a future city—one which maintains human spirit and emotion at its core."
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Pulling Seniority

2018 Best of Design Awards winners for Unbuilt - Residential
2018 Best of Design Award for Unbuilt – Residential: Brooklyn Senior Affordable Housing Designer: Only If Location: Brooklyn, New York Located on a former industrial site, the Brooklyn Senior Affordable Housing complex designed by Only If consists of 84 rental apartments and community facilities. The building, configured into several block-like volumes, rests on two wide columns and a circular disk, which contains all of the circulation and services. The middle volume of the building frames a central communal space for its elderly and formerly homeless residents. This double-height loggia is carved out of the building to become a stage elevated above the city. The public living room will serve as a flexible space where residents can gather, linger, interact, and build a sense of community. Various features will be introduced to support the health of the building’s residents, including outdoor exercise equipment and a roof garden. A secondary circulation route—composed of an open and relaxed stair system—will be an active alternative to elevators. Honorable Mention Project name: 150 Central Park South penthouse Designer: SPAN Architecture Location: New York Honorable Mention Project name: Courtyard House Architect: Inaba Williams Location: Santa Monica, California