Search results for "multi-family residential"

Placeholder Alt Text

Multi-Family Residential
Richard Barnes / Courtesy of Alloy

On December 12, in New York City, seven jurors convened to evaluate and discuss more than 200 projects submitted to AN's second annual Best Of Design Awards.

The jury included Thomas Balsley, of Thomas Balsley Associates; Winka Dubbeldam, of ARCHI-TECTONICS; Kenneth Drucker, of HOK; Chris McVoy, of Steven Holl Architects; Craig Schwitter, of Buro Happold; Annabelle Selldorf, of Selldorf Architects; and Erik Tietz, of Tietz-Baccon.

This year, the jury reviewed projects submitted in nine categories, including Best Landscape, Best Fabrication Project, Best Single Family House, Best Multi-Family Residential, Best Residential Interior, Best Non-Residential Interior, Best Facade, Best Student Built Work, and Building of the Year.

In some categories the jury selected a winner and honorable mentions, in others just winners, and in one, Single Family House, they selected a tie between two winners. Over the coming days we will be posting all of the jury’s selections.

 

Best Of: Multi-Family Residential

185 Plymouth Street
Brooklyn, New York
Alloy

“I like the juxtaposition of the historic facades with the hint that something is happening internally, and the contrast of the punched openings on the historic facades and the transparency of the courtyard is great. It will be a surprise when you come into each of these units.”—Kenneth Drucker

   
 

Acting as both architect and developer, Alloy acquired 185 Plymouth Street in 2012 to convert it to residential apartments. The original building, built in 1900 as a stable for Arbuckle Brothers, was a 200-foot-deep, thru-block building. The deep floor plates were not ideal for residential living.

 

Using the site constraints as an opportunity in a process of subtraction, Alloy carved a courtyard through the center of the building, bringing light and air to the middle of the lot. The excavated volume was reorganized on top of the resulting two buildings as contemporary penthouse additions.

A new curtain wall facade surrounds the interior courtyard, where landscaped bridges and gardens create a tranquil, hidden inner space. The brick and timber structure was thoughtfully restored to expose its historic character, while new elements were carefully inserted.


Courtesy Lorcan O’Herlihy Architects
 

Best Of: Multi-Family Residential: Honorable Mention

Cloverdale749
Los Angeles, California
Lorcan O’Herlihy Architects

Located around the corner from LA’s Miracle Mile, this four-story, six-unit development maximizes its land use potential, fitting 10,500 square feet within the site’s zoning constraints. Interior and exterior spaces are blurred with outdoor circulation, private balconies, and a roof deck. Window, deck, and walkway placement take advantage of views of the Hollywood sign and downtown LA.

 
 

The building’s white metal skin plays with context and contrast, responding to its neutral stucco neighbors while also standing out as a decidedly contemporary expression.


Courtesy CetraRuddy
 

Best Of: Multi-Family Residential: Honorable Mention

One Madison
New York, New York
CetraRuddy

This 50-story residential tower in Manhattan’s Flatiron District takes its design cues from the Metabolist movement of the late 1960s and early 70s with modular plug-in “pods” that cantilever to the north and east of the main tower shaft, which gives residents 360-degree views of the city.

   
 

Earth-toned bronze glass on the tower shaft responds in a modern way to the neighborhood’s predominately masonry context, while the proportions and massing of the building create a dialog with neighboring MetLife tower.

The structural scheme of cruciform reinforced concrete shear walls moves the tower’s lateral bracing to the interior, leaving the perimeter open for views.

Placeholder Alt Text

Residential Multi-family
Courtesy Alloy Design

For AN’s third annual design awards, seven jurors gathered in New York to review nearly 500 projects submitted by architects and designers.

The jury included Amale Andraos, dean of Columbia Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation; Nicholas Koster, project manager at Snøhetta; Chee Perlman, editor and curator of Chee Company; Ana Garcia Puyol, computational designer at Thornton Tomasetti; Ali Tayar; founder of Parallel Design Partnership, Terence Riley, founding partner at Keenan/Riley, and Mimi Zeiger, AN’s west coast editor.

In each category, a winner and an honorable mention were selected, although there were a couple of ties. Over the coming days, we will be posting their selections in the 21 categories. 

Residential Multi-family Winner

Dumbo Townhouses
Architect: Alloy Design
Location: Brooklyn, NY

“A continuous facade combines the individual townhouses into a block which is particularly fitting for the industrial past of this NYC neighborhood.”
—Ali Tayar, Parallel Design Partnership

Located on a small lot in Brooklyn, the DUMBO Townhouses are five townhouses of approximately 3,500 square feet. A unique sectional strategy offers a generous program of four bedrooms, three baths, covered parking and outdoor space with parlor floor ceiling heights and multiple skylit rooms. Across from a park and located within a landmarked district, the industrial warehouse context inspired a cladding of tensile Ductal concrete panels composed of a series of tapered fins. Interspersed with full height windows, the cladding offers a combination of generous light and air with solar shading and privacy. The locally based team acted as architect, contractor, developer and broker for the project.


Honorable Mention

Courtesy Morris Adjmi Architects

The Schumacher
Architect: Morris Adjmi Architects
Location: New York


Honorable Mention

Courtesy Lorcan O'Herlihy Architects

SL11024
Architect: Lorcan O’Herlihy Architects
Location: Los Angeles

 

Placeholder Alt Text

Cortex

220-unit residential project in St. Louis bioscience and technology complex unveiled

Kansas City–based architect el dorado and developer Silliman have released schematic designs for a mixed-use commercial and multi-family residential project as part of a larger development, Cortex 3.0, a bioscience and technology research community in St. Louis. The project will include 180,000 square feet of residential and 20,000 square feet of retail throughout seven stories. The approximately 220 apartment units range from studios to two bedrooms and balconies are nestled in setbacks along the building facade. Though materials have not yet been designated, initial renderings envision the project wrapped in corrugated metal, referencing the site’s industrial past. The growing Cortex district will also include a hotel designed by Boston-based Group One and a new office building designed by the St. Louis office of HOK. El dorado’s project is expected to be complete by the end of 2018.

Architect: el dorado Client: Cortex Location: St. Louis
Placeholder Alt Text

5468796 architecture
The Guertin Boatport in Storm Bay, Ontario, is a two-tier viewing deck, completed in 2011.
Courtesy 5468796 architecture

The Architectural League’s 30th annual Emerging Voices Award brings a focus to creative practices that will influence the direction of architecture. Each of the eight firms will deliver a lecture at the Cooper Union's Rose Auditorium at 41 Cooper Square in Manhattan. The first lecture takes place on Friday, March 2 at 7:00 p.m. when 5468796 architecture and Inaba will present their work.

5468796 architecture
Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada

Five years ago, two architects brought forth near the longitudinal center of the North American continent 5468796 architecture, a studio dedicated to the proposition that design-oriented architecture has a place in Winnipeg, Manitoba. The practice has since grown from its initial duo to a cadre of ten professionals and has been lauded with an impressive array of awards for its inventive portfolio, which includes residential complexes, office buildings, and student centers, among other typologies. But fulfilling the firm’s mission statement has not been easy going.

The YouCube residential project experiments with density and affordability in downtown Winnipeg.
 

“People see our projects and say we must have great clients,” explained Sasa Radulovic, one of the studio’s founders. “The truth is opposite. Winnipeg is poor in terms of client knowledge. Their expectations are quite mundane. It is necessary for us to figure out how to teach each client so they will appreciate something different. It’s actually very hard, like trying to design a project in a language you don’t understand.”

Part of 5468796’s success in this uphill design battle can be attributed to the firm’s collaborative approach, which is memorialized in its name. “It’s our corporation number,” said Radulovic. “It’s a record in place and time. It creates an idea of a collaborative.”

   
Clockwise From top: The 24-unit BGBX lofts alternate scales above a commercial base; Bloc10 in Winnipeg attempts to create unexpected moments in a typical apartment typology; the Welcome Place refugee resettlement center in Winnipeg mixes offices, residences, and reception space; Centre Village is a 25-unit housing complex on an infill lot in Winnipeg’s Central Park neighborhood.
 

Whether through the power of persuasion or by grace of the spirit of collaboration, 5468796 has invigorated Winnipeg’s otherwise drab and conservative built environment with unexpected and exuberant infill projects. Two of the firm’s residential buildings highlight its boundary-breaking work. Most of the city’s housing stock comes in the form of three-story walkups, literal and rectangular blocks of buildings that fill their lots and usher occupants in by way of windowless double-loaded corridors. At Centre Village—a 25-unit, 15,000-square-foot co-op development—the firm broke up the complex’s volume into a series of modular boxes that cantilever off one another in a seemingly random but carefully considered arrangement that clusters apartments around a central courtyard. BLOC10, on the other hand—a 12,000-square-foot condominium development—maintains the “block” profile, but gets creative in the interior, where the designers focused a great deal of attention in staggering the three-story units across the plan so that each features a multiplicity of views and exposures.

Placeholder Alt Text

Open Season

The Cultural Landscape Foundation announces threatened landscapes of 2017
On October 12, The Cultural Landscape Foundation (TCLF) released its annual assessment of “threatened and at-risk landscapes” in the United States. This year’s thirteen sites were organized based on five themes: “monetization of open space,” in which parks come under pressure to generate profit; “resource extraction,” which is under particular attack by Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke, who proposed relaxing management rules for six monuments, exposing them to mining and logging; “park equity,” charging to use parks or converting them to sport and cultural venues; “detrimental effects of shadow,” where the surrounding development is built up to the point where the park no longer receives adequate light; and “the devaluation of cultural lifeways,” in which ancestral lands and other sites of cultural significance are threatened. These landscapes span a broad set of environments, from Greenacre Park in New York City to the Boundary Waters wilderness area in northeastern Minnesota. Twelve sites are listed below. The others, Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante in Utah and Gold Butte in Nevada, are three of the six threatened National Monuments that come under threat if the Antiquities Act of 1906 allows Zinke to adjust boundaries that could open up the potential of mining and drilling. Discovery Park Seattle At over 530 acres in the Puget Sound, Discovery Park is the largest public park in Seattle. Featuring work from the Olmsted Brokers, Dan Kiley, Ian Tyndall, and Peter Ker Walker, the park is under threat from an art campus that would, among other things, host concerts in a 600-seat auditorium. Coyote Valley San Jose, California Under threat of suburban sprawl from the surrounding Silicon Valley, Coyote Valley is 7,400 acres of undeveloped land that is used for farming, a corridor for wildlife, and flood control. Boundary Waters Canoe Wilderness Area Northeastern Minnesota One million acres of forestland that was protected by the 1964 Wilderness Act is now under threat of mining. Jackson Park Chicago The Obama Presidential Center has claimed a portion of the iconic 1871 park, designed by Frederick Olmsted and Calvert Vaux, for its own. Fort Negley Nashville Formerly a Civil War fortification built by enslaved African Americans, Fort Negley Park is now a site of cultural and historic significance. The City of Nashville is proposing to build a mixed-use development on 40 percent of the park that is currently an abandoned sports stadium and parking lot rather than return the site to park land. Sanctuary Woods Milwaukee Originally known as the Milwaukee County Asylum for the Insane, the 1880 structure by Henry Koch and its surrounding gardens was a precursor to healing gardens and designing for health. A plan to build a multi-family residential development on the site was announced earlier this year. Audubon Park and City Park New Orleans In a well-intentioned attempt to fund its park system (which is in serious need of funds), the managers of Audubon and City Parks now charge a fee for entry, limiting its public use. Boston Common Boston Boston Common and its adjacent garden, established in 1836, are under threat of a 700-foot-tall tower that would case a shadow on the space. State House Grounds Rhode Island Surrounding a Beaux-Arts building by McKim, Mead & White, the lawn and grounds could be replaced by a proposed “intermodal transportation center.” Greenacre Park New York A tiny—60 by 120 feet—park designed by Sasaki, Dawson, & DeMay could soon be devoid of sunlight thanks to new zoning regulations in Midtown Manhattan. Battery Park City New York A bid to redesign the 92-acre park in the name of resiliency could dramatically change its current landscape. James River Jamestown, Virginia Currently the largest tributary to the Chesapeake Bay, the river is under threat by a conditional permit that would build 17 transmission towers across the river and another 27 towers throughout the region.
Placeholder Alt Text

Streaky

Architecture Billings Index makes it six positive scores in a row
It's six in a row for the Architecture Billings Index (ABI). This July, the reported score from the American Institute of Architects (AIA) was 51.9. Despite this being down from June's 54.2, the score means that the ABI hasn't been in the red since January. Other scores, however, were up from the previous month. The projects inquiry index increased by 0.9 from 58.6 to 59.5 and likewise, the design contracts index increased from 53.7 to 56.4. This six-month streak follows last year's trend when six positive scores came during the same months. In 2016, however, the tide turned in August when that positive stretch was broken. The swing that year resulted in a dip from 51.5 to 49.7, continuing a downward trend from the previous months, and a similar scenario is being set up here. The ABI is the leading economic indicator of construction activity. It reflects a 9 to 12 month lead time between architecture billings and construction spending. The national index, design contracts, and inquiries are calculated monthly, while the regional and sector categories are calculated as a three-month moving average. The index runs on a scale from 0-100 and scores above 50 suggest growth while anything below implies negativity in the market “The July figures show the continuation of healthy trends in the construction sector of our economy,” said AIA Chief Economist Kermit Baker in a press release. “In addition to the balanced increases in design billings across all major regions and construction sectors, the strong gains in new project work coming into architecture firms points to future growth in design and construction activity over coming quarters.” Key July ABI highlights: • Regional averages: South (53.8), Midwest (53.8), Northeast (53.6), West (50.9) • Sector index breakdown: multi-family residential (55.8), commercial / industrial (55.4), institutional (52.0), mixed practice (48.4) • Project inquiries index: 59.5 • Design contracts index: 56.4
Placeholder Alt Text

5 in-a-row

Architecture firms enjoy strong end to the year’s second quarter
Marking five consecutive months of positive scores, the Architecture Billings Index score for June prolonged the purple patch for U.S. architecture firms. If last year is anything to go by, the billings index did not drop until August. For June, a score of 54.2 was reported, a steady increase from May's 53.0. While scores overall increased, particularly on the East Coast, the projects inquiry index was 58.6, down from a reading of 62.4. Also on the decrease, though staying positive, was the design contracts index which dipped from 54.8 to 53.7. The ABI is the leading economic indicator of construction activity. It reflects a 9 to 12 month lead time between architecture billings and construction spending. The national index, design contracts, and inquiries are calculated monthly, while the regional and sector categories are calculated as a three-month moving average. The index runs on a scale from 0-100 and scores above 50 suggest growth while anything below implies negativity in the market “So far this year, new activity coming into architecture firms has generally exceeded their ability to complete ongoing projects,” said AIA Chief Economist, Kermit Baker, Hon. AIA, PhD in a press release. “Now, firms seem to be ramping up enough to manage these growing workloads.” Key June ABI highlights:
  • Regional averages: South (54.8), West (53.1), Midwest (51.9), Northeast (51.5)
  • Sector index breakdown: multi-family residential (57.1), mixed practice (53.8), institutional (52.6), commercial / industrial (52.1)
  • Project inquiries index: 58.6
  • Design contracts index: 53.7
Placeholder Alt Text

ABI

Billings Index continues its 2017 positive streak
Off the back of ending the first quarter of the year on a high, and in the wake of what is usually the year's peak construction season, the Architectural Billings Index (ABI) has remained strong. This May, a score of 53.0 marked the fourth positive month in a row as the Billings Index stays true to last year's good form. If that continues, we can expect two more months of more-or-less the same. May was also an improvement on April, which reported a score 50.9. Also on the up was the projects inquiry index which rose from 60.2 to 62.4, and the design contracts index which increased slightly from 53.2 to 54.8. The ABI is the leading economic indicator of construction activity. It reflects a 9 to 12 month lead time between architecture billings and construction spending. The national index, design contracts, and inquiries are calculated monthly, while the regional and sector categories are calculated as a three-month moving average. The index runs on a scale from 0-100 and scores above 50 suggest growth while anything below implies negativity in the market. “The fact that the data surrounding both new project inquiries and design contracts have remained positive every month this year, while reaching their highest scores for the year, is a good indication that both the architecture and construction sectors will remain healthy for the foreseeable future,” said AIA Chief Economist, Kermit Baker, Hon. AIA, PhD. in a press release. “This growth hasn’t been an overnight escalation, but rather a steady, stable increase.” Key May ABI highlights: •           Regional averages: South (56.1), West (52.3), Midwest (50.4), Northeast (46.5) •           Sector index breakdown: mixed practice (55.8), multi-family residential (51.3), commercial / industrial (51.2), institutional (51.2) •           Project inquiries index: 62.4 •           Design contracts index: 54.8
Placeholder Alt Text

ABI

Billings continue to increase as construction season nears peak
Three is the magic number for the Architectural Billings Index, it seems, as April marks a hat-trick of consecutive positive scores. The three-month long positive streak will be welcome news, but not all within the industry will be surprised that April reported a positive score of 50.9 as the construction season approaches its zenith. This score, however, was down from March's 54.3. Meanwhile, Design Contracts and Inquiries were both up from the previous month, rising to 53.2 and 60.2 from 52.3 and 59.8 respectively. If last year is anything to go by, we can expect three more months of positive scores. The ABI is the leading economic indicator of construction activity. It reflects a 9 to 12 month lead time between architecture billings and construction spending. The national index, design contracts, and inquiries are calculated monthly, while the regional and sector categories are calculated as a three-month moving average. The index runs on a scale from 0-100 and scores above 50 suggest growth while anything below implies negativity in the market. “Probably even better news for the construction outlook is that new project work coming into architecture firms has seen exceptionally strong growth so far this year,” said AIA Chief Economist, Kermit Baker, Hon. AIA, PhD in a press release. “In fact, new project activity has pushed up project backlogs at architecture firms to their highest level since the design market began its recovery earlier this decade.” Key April ABI highlights: • Regional averages: South (55.3), Midwest (53.3), West (50.9), Northeast (50.7) • Sector index breakdown: institutional (54.0), mixed practice (53.4), commercial / industrial (52.4), multi-family residential (49.9) • Project inquiries index: 60.2 • Design contracts index: 53.2
Placeholder Alt Text

ABI

Billings Index continues strong form, ending first quarter on a high
The Architecture Billings Index (ABI) has continued its surge as the first quarter of the year ended and the American Institute of Architects (AIA) reported a March ABI score of 54.3, up from 50.7 the previous month. The new year ABI hangover (now seemingly customary) is now all but a distant memory as the ABI established a two-month-long positive streak. Last year, the ABI score for January was 49.6 but the following six months were all positive scores. Additionally, the new projects inquiry index was 59.8, down from a reading of 61.5 the previous month, while the new design contracts index dipped from 54.7 to 52.3. So let's not get ahead of ourselves. The ABI is the leading economic indicator of construction activity. It reflects a 9 to 12 month lead time between architecture billings and construction spending. The national index, design contracts, and inquiries are calculated monthly, while the regional and sector categories are calculated as a three-month moving average. The index runs on a scale from 0-100 and scores above 50 suggest growth while anything below implies negativity in the market. “The first quarter started out on uneasy footing, but fortunately ended on an upswing entering the traditionally busy spring season,” said AIA Chief Economist, Kermit Baker, Hon. AIA, PhD. “All sectors showed growth except for the commercial/industrial market, which, for the first time in over a year displayed a decrease in design services.” Key March ABI highlights: • Regional averages: Midwest (54.6), South (52.6), Northeast (52.4), West (50.2) • Sector index breakdown: multi-family residential (54.6), mixed practice (53.7), institutional (52.9), commercial / industrial (49.8) • Project inquiries index: 59.8 • Design contracts index: 52.3
Placeholder Alt Text

Back in the black

Architecture Billings Index witnesses resurgence after bad start to 2017
The Architecture Billings Index (ABI) is over its little January wobble. As early 2017 indicated a slow start to the year, the dip into the red proved only temporary as the American Institute of Architects (AIA) reported the February ABI score was 50.7, up from a score of 49.5 in the previous month. December, by contrast, produced a score of 55.6. The score suggests that January was merely a minor blip, following the trend of recent years where the first month of the year was the only negative among positive scores. Last year, the AIA reported positive results for the following six months after a sketchy start to 2016 and this year looks on track to emulate this. The ABI is the leading economic indicator of construction activity. It reflects a 9 to 12 month lead time between architecture billings and construction spending. The national index, design contracts, and inquiries are calculated monthly, while the regional and sector categories are calculated as a three-month moving average. The index runs on a scale from 0-100 and scores above 50 suggest growth while anything below implies negativity in the market. “The sluggish start to the year in architecture firm billings should give way to stronger design activity as the year progresses,” said AIA Chief Economist, Kermit Baker in a press release. “New project inquiries have been very strong through the first two months of the year, and in February new design contracts at architecture firms posted their largest  monthly gain in over two years.” Key January ABI highlights:
  • Regional averages: Midwest (52.4), South (50.5), Northeast (50.0), West (47.5)
  • Sector index breakdown: institutional (51.8), multi-family residential (49.3), mixed practice (49.2), commercial / industrial (48.9)
  • Project inquiries index: 61.5
  • Design contracts index: 54.7
Placeholder Alt Text

New Year Blues

Architecture Billings Index indicates slow start to 2017

This isn't fake news, the Architecture Billings Index (ABI) has dipped, and no, Jimmy Kimmel isn't here to rectify the mistake. The bad start to the year comes off the back of what had been a positive end to 2016 for the ABI. In January, the AIA reported an ABI a score of 49.5, a contrast to December's 55.6.

Indeed, the last month of 2016's score indicated the largest increase in design services for that year, but perhaps it is an unjust comparison to make. The previous two January scores were slightly negative and came after positive December scores. Last year, the ABI score for January was 49.6 but the following six months were all positive scores. So perhaps we shouldn't be too worried, yet.

The ABI is the leading economic indicator of construction activity. It reflects a 9 to 12 month lead time between architecture billings and construction spending. The national index, design contracts, and inquiries are calculated monthly, while the regional and sector categories are calculated as a three-month moving average. The index runs on a scale from 0-100 and scores above 50 suggest growth while anything below implies negativity in the market. “This small decrease in activity, taking into consideration strong readings in project inquiries and new design contracts, isn’t exactly a cause for concern,” said AIA Chief Economist Kermit Baker in a press release. “The fundamentals of a sound nonresidential design and construction market persist.” Key January ABI highlights:
  • Regional averages: South (54.2), Northeast (53.0), Midwest (52.4), West (48.8)
  • Sector index breakdown: institutional (54.6), commercial / industrial (53.4), mixed practice (48.1), multi-family residential (48.1)
  • Project inquiries index: 60.0
  • Design contracts index: 52.1