Search results for "ROSSETTI"

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New Lakers headquarters by Rossetti and Perkins+Will gives team home court advantage
As Los Angeles braces for the likelihood of one or more new football stadium projects, the National Basketball Association's Los Angeles Lakers have unveiled plans for a sports facility of its own. Rossetti, a design firm specializing in the sports and entertainment industries, teamed up with the L.A. office of Perkins+Will on a 120,000-square-foot training center and administrative headquarters. Slated to open in spring 2017, the project provides the Lakers organization with a significant facilities upgrade from their current leasing arrangement at the Toyota Sports Center in nearby El Segundo. Preliminary renderings of the exterior depict a subtly detailed, rectilinear structure occupying a corner lot, the warm-hued second-floor volume floating over a concrete base. Vertical fins, featured prominently, work to shade direct sunshine as well as limit direct visibility, opting instead to give visitors fleeting glimpses of activities within. While the new headquarters might be seen as part of an increasing trend of developing exclusive facilities for professional sports teams, the Lakers' case is unique: it seeks to consolidate all of its seasonal and year-round operations under one roof. “For the design, we wanted to incorporate the idea of an innovative workplace, where hierarchies are removed, and people come across each other in a common social space,” explained Rossetti design principal Jim Renne. The hope is to create an integrated environment for all levels of staff, executives and players alike in which to interact. “You can hear a basketball bouncing, or you catch a glimpse of star player,” he said, imagining hallways in the new two-level facility. The ground floor comprises all basketball functions including full- and half-size courts, players' lockers, lounges, treatment areas, and an open-air player courtyard—a key design element. The upper floor holds staff and management offices, with views down onto the courts below. This interplay of visibility, light, and program between levels reflects the organization's and design team's search for a new typological benchmark—“a training facility, 2.0,” said Renne. “Before, training facilities were very rudimentary, with not a whole lot of attention paid to the quality of the space.” The Lakers Headquarters positions itself as both an architectural centerpiece for a brand recognized worldwide, as well as an asset to the local community. The organization has chosen to remain in El Segundo, a small oceanside city in greater Los Angeles, due to its long-term ties there and, perhaps as importantly, its proximity to Los Angeles International Airport. It will also serve as home for their Development League affiliate team, the Los Angeles D-Fenders, incorporating a 750-seat venue for hosting games and other public events. The price tag is $80 million, but Renne stresses the scheme’s cost-conscious nature. “The reality is, it's not a ton of money for what we're trying to do,” he said. “To create a facility like this is difficult for an organization to do, as there's no significant return on investment.” Return or not, the Lakers see a facilities consolidation as a significant draw for attracting future players in a highly competitive free-agent market—a state-of-the-art “home away from home”—something critical in today's sports climate. According to Renne, the project brief was deceptively simple: “design a place where players want to come, and to create a whole environment that caters to the needs of the player.”
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Rossetti
Detroit Zoo Penguin Puffin concept study.
Courtesy Rossetti

Known for infusing behemoth-sized stadiums with an unexpected creative edge, the Detroit-based firm Rossetti works internationally but has called the Motor City home for 42 years. While this may be an unlikely decision, Principal Matt Rossetti would not have it any other way. “There’s all of a sudden a freshness to the grit of this city,” he said. While that may be new, the city’s reputation as incubator for young design talent is not. The firm has benefited from a plethora of local design education available at Cranbrook, University of Detroit Mercy, Lawrence Tech, and the College for Creative Studies. Working across the globe with satellite offices in LA’s Newport Beach, Denver, and Shanghai, the firm remains committed to design that is about infusing even the biggest of spaces with a nuanced conceptual aesthetic. While their work can at times be intended for an audience of 35,000 (such as a new soccer stadium in Stockholm), the firm never forgets the individual. “The way people move through space is all about being with other people. We build to energize these activities,” explained Rossetti.

Since the common thread to the firm’s work is space planning, sometimes the spaces between the architecture are the ones that shined most. From sports arenas for the masses to conference rooms for a few privileged executives, Rossetti brings high polish to design work born in a city of grit.

Sarah F. Cox


Greektown Casino Hotel

Detroit, MI

   
[+ Click to enlarge.]
 

In an attempt to infuse this mostly-brick downtown with a new effervescence, the architects created a tower with exterior walls composed of four different blue glasses. Envisioned as a mosaic of clouds and sky, it has been one of the brighter spots to change the city’s skyline in the last five years.


Stockholm Globe Arena

Stockholm, Sweden

 
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Four different venues—for soccer, multiple sports, hockey, and performing arts—will be connected by a public plaza draped with a glass-and-steel canopy that is meant to mimic the look of draped lace. In total the project is 85,000 square feet with the large stadiums shaped as both globes and boxes unified by the roofing.


Detroit Zoo Penguin Puffin Conservatory Concept Study

Detroit, MI

 
[+ Click to enlarge.]
 

Everyone thinks of penguins on ice year round, but this part of the zoo needs to plan for all four Midwestern seasons. The architects used the bird’s body positions as metaphor for the building shell and created a louvered structure than opens and closes its “wings” as the birds do in the wild to retain heat or cool themselves.


Red Bull Arena Soccer Stadium

Harrison, NJ

The combination of open air over the field and a full coverage canopy over spectator seating makes this the first European-style soccer stadium in the U.S. Shaped to amplify the crowd’s cheers, it’s also acoustically well-suited for concerts and seats 35,000 spectators.

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Court Records

The US Open starts a new chapter in its architectural history
Though the US Open has been hosted at its current complex for 50 years, the tournament itself has been going on since 1881, meaning there’s a rich backstory about where and how America’s Grand Slam has evolved. This year marked a new chapter in the tournament's history as the new Louis Armstrong Stadium opened for play, ending a five-year renovation project of the site's currently facilities. Here’s a brief history lesson in the architectural layout and legacy of the world-renowned United States Open Tennis Championships. Luckily for tennis lovers, all of these spaces are still playable today. International Tennis Hall of Fame, Newport, Rhode Island Perhaps the oldest and most prominent tennis facility in the United States, this ancestral home of the US Open welcomes players from all over the world to its historic grass courts and Victorian-style clubhouse. Formerly named the Newport Casino, the facility was designed by McKim, Mead & White in 1880 and was the center of the city’s society in its heyday. Upon opening, it hosted the first U.S. National Men’s Singles Championship in 1881. When the tournament outgrew its Newport location in 1914, it was relocated to the West Side Tennis Club in Forest Hills, New York, eventually evolving into what we know today as the US Open. When the site was in danger of demolition in the 1950s, it was repositioned as the International Hall of Fame and later became a National Historic Landmark in 1987, preserving a shining example of American shingle-style architecture. West Side Tennis Club, Forest Hills, New York This 125-year-old tennis club was founded not long after the Newport Casino opened in Rhode Island. Established in 1892 in its original Upper West Side location, the club built out its current facilities in Forest Hills in order to accommodate its growing membership. The grounds were set within Forest Hills Gardens, a 175-acre community designed by Frederick Law Olmsted, Jr. Overlooking the courts is a stunning Tudor-style clubhouse built to complement the surrounding Georgian and Tudor homes. The United States Lawn Tennis Association National Championship moved the tournament to the West Side Tennis Club in 1915, where it continued every year until 1977. Today, the club boasts 38 tennis courts of varying surfaces including grass, hard, red clay, and Har-Tru, as well the 13,000-seat Forest Hills Stadium, the country’s first arena featuring a concrete facade. Today, the stadium hosts a celebrated summer music series along with other arts events. A junior Olympic-size swimming pool and paddle tennis courts are also included on site. USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, Flushing, New York Located three miles north of the West Side Tennis Club, this 46.5-acre complex has been the current home of the US Open since 1978. It was initially called the USTA National Tennis Center but was later rededicated in 2006 to women’s tennis champion Billie Jean King. The campus is set within Flushing Meadows–Corona Park and today features 33 courts including three mega-arenas: Arthur Ashe Stadium, Louis Armstrong Stadium, and the Grandstand. The latter two structures exclusively held the Open matches until Ashe was built in 1977. After rain delays majorly halted play during from 2008 to 2012, the USTA created a master plan to rebrand and solidify the entire complex ahead of the tournament’s 50th anniversary in 2018. This $600 million overhaul included demolishing the 54-year-old Armstrong Stadium, which was originally constructed as the Singer Bowl for the 1964-65 World’s Fair. A new, 14,000-seat structure was built from scratch in its place, opening this summer just in time for play. The multi-year renovation project, led by Detroit-based firm ROSSETTI, also included a new show court for the 8,000-seat Grandstand featuring a translucent skin that wraps around the facility. Most notably, two new PTFE retractable roofs now top Armstrong and the 23,771-seat Ashe Stadium where the major matches are held. The flexible roofing systems, which can open and close in five to seven minutes, now allow games to go on rain or shine.
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Serving Up Sustainability

New naturally-ventilated Louis Armstrong Stadium debuts at US Open
Today tennis takes over the world’s stage with the start of the 2018 US Open. Now in its 50th year, the tournament will play out within the newly renovated USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in Flushing, Queens. The five-year, $600-million project is now finished with the opening of the site’s final project: the Louis Armstrong Stadium, the world's first naturally ventilated tennis arena with a retractable roof. Over the next two weeks, hundreds of thousands of fans will descend upon the city to watch the final Grand Slam of the year, and while the tennis champions themselves are the real stars of the show, the stadium architecture will be prominently on display. The highly-anticipated renovation marks the end of the site’s fraught history with deteriorating courts and rain delays messing up major events.     Designed by Detroit-based firm Rossetti, the new 14,000-seat Louis Armstrong Stadium evokes the feel of the old arena, which the USTA opened in 1978, but includes modern feats of engineering and sustainable design additions that bring it into the 21st century of sports architecture. The stadium boasts 40 percent more seating than its predecessor in two levels of precast concrete bowls and an advanced shading system that’s anchored by a fixed, cantilevered roof deck. Matches can proceed rain or shine thanks to the masterfully-engineered two-piece, moving roof that covers the court. Called a “complex, stackable sun room” by the architects, the retractable roof features 284,000-pound PTFE fabric panels that create a 38,160-square-foot opening after traveling 25 feet per minute in under seven minutes from the stadium’s edge. The transparent, lightweight fabric diffuses a soft light into the arena when closed, transferring 73 percent of the sun’s energy. The sides of the stadium additionally allow breezes to flow through the facility. Rossetti placed 14,250 overlapping terracotta louvers on the north and south sides of the structure that act as horizontal window blinds. The siding material is a nod to the traditional brick buildings found throughout the tennis grounds. Construction began on the new stadium two years ago when the 52-year-old Armstrong arena was demolished after the 2016 championship. Originally built for the 1964 World’s Fair, the structure was much-loved because it gave fans an intimate experience and unbeatable views with sky-high, stacked seating. Louis Armstrong Stadium 2.0, as many are nicknaming it, does the same but with a more porous, contemporary design. Plus, it has a built-in umbrella that ensures consistency of play no matter the weather. To celebrate its opening, Armstrong will hold more matches during the 2018 US Open than its neighboring Arthur Ashe Stadium, an 18,000-seat arena that also received a flexible roofing system during the renovation. Both stadiums will hold two matches at night, but Armstrong will see three during the day while Ashe will host two.
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SHoP 'til you Drop

Gensler takes over from SHoP on Cleveland’s Quicken Loans Arena redesign
Gensler has replaced New York firm SHoP Architects on the design for the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio. SHoP had revealed its designs for the Cleveland Cavaliers' basketball stadium, known as "The Q," in December 2016. Work was scheduled to begin on the $140 million project the following year; however, work was delayed for a number of reasons. A spokesperson for Gensler confirmed to AN that Detroit-based stadia specialists Rossetti, who worked with SHoP on the original project, remain involved. Renderings given to AN by Gensler show the arena's overall design is mostly unchanged. Gensler's design team will come mostly from its Washington D.C. office and be spearheaded by Ryan Sickman, who holds the position of Firmwide Sports Practice Area Leader at the firm. Len Komoroski, the Cleveland Cavaliers and Quicken Loans Arena CEO, commented that Gensler was "well-positioned" for the "extensive transformation" of the 24-year-old arena. "Their experience and global foot print are a great match for this project and the image of Cleveland that will be projected around the world from The Q" he continued in a statement, adding: "The project is off to a great start and we look forward to seeing this unique, impactful transformation come to life." Surprisingly, another collaboration between the two firms wasn't on the cards, despite Gensler and SHoP having previously worked together on the Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum in Long Island, another stadium revamp. The former was completed almost exactly a year ago today. In 2013, SHoP's design for a New York City F.C. stadium in Flushing Meadows Corona Park was given the boot amid opposition. "I like the idea of a soccer venue in New York City… What I'm not crazy about is the fact that they want to take public park land in the process," said New York City Comptroller John Liu at the time regarding plans to plonk the 25,000-seat stadium on up to 13 acres in the park. After scouting the Bronx, Columbia University and Belmont Park in Nassau County, and failing to secure a stadium site, New York City F.C. is still on the hunt for a home. Despite only being 22 years old, the Quicken Loans Arena is one of the oldest facilities in use on the National Basketball Association circuit. SHoP's design featured a new glazed facade which stretches the stadium’s footprint closer to the street edge. This fenestration reveals an undulating arrangement of what appears to be wood panels which, given their location well inside the facade and north-facing orientation, don’t seem to serve any shading purpose. Aside from aesthetics, entrance and exit gangway areas will witness an increase in space, thus aiding circulation—a necessity considering The Q hosts more than 200 events every year.
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Transit City

Metro Detroit still struggling to agree on regional transit plan
Despite the weekly announcement of new developments in Detroit, from stadiums to skyscrapers, the city still faces a number of systemic issues that continue to plague its large population of economically disadvantaged residents. One of these issues, the topic of much-heated debate in recent years, is transit. The 2016 election represented a chance for the entire southeast Michigan region to reinvigorate its mass transit system, but a “no” vote sent planners and citizens back to the drawing board in hopes of a second try in 2018. The Regional Transit Master Plan, put forward by the Regional Transit Authority of Southeast Michigan (RTA), was meant to unify mass transit in the four counties surrounding Detroit with $4.7 billion in new investments, raised from a new tax and available state and federal funds. The RTA was founded in 2012 to successfully achieve this, after nearly half a century of other failed authorities. Going back as far as the 1950s, transit has been strictly divided between the mostly white suburbs and the mostly African American Detroit. And while there are many indications that this was a racial issue when the policy was made, today it has become an economic issue that many believe can no longer be ignored. Detroit’s transportation needs are enigmatic in many ways. The city is in the top ten for least car owners per capita, while it does not even chart in per-capita spending on mass transit. While three in five Detroiters work outside of the city, often in low-paying jobs, three in four jobs in the city are filled by workers from the suburbs. This means that Detroit has one of the longest average commuting distances in the country, a bit over ten miles. Many areas of the city don’t have nearly enough jobs, some as low as 100 positions per 1,000 residents. All of this together means that the economies of the suburbs and the city are inextricably linked; reliable mass transit would be an undeniable asset. The Regional Transit Master Plan was designed specifically to address these disparities and provide more comprehensive service to the entire region. Regional bus rapid transit (BRT) routes would run from the suburbs to the city center, new routes would be developed in currently underserved areas, and a regional light rail would stretch from Detroit to Ann Arbor. One of the major aspects of the plan, which was also one of the most debated, was that it would no longer allow individual suburbs to opt out of the transit system. Currently 50 suburbs have no mass transit system, as they have opt- ed out of the Suburban Mobility Authority for Regional Transportation (SMART). This is cited as being one of the main reasons for service gaps in outlying areas. Another is- sue facing opposition was the funding model, which included a new tax that would cost most taxpayers approximately $95 per year over the next 20 years. When the plan came up for vote in the November 2016 election, it was rejected by roughly 20,000 votes, losing 49.5 percent to 50.5 percent. The measure was approved in two of the counties, and came close in a third. Alone, the fourth, Macomb County, was able to sway the outcome. One year on, the RTA is still trying to figure out a path forward with the possibility of another proposal in 2018. Not waiting for that possibility, the suburban transit system, SMART, is launching its own extended BRT system to provide greater links to the city. Detroit has made recent transit headway also. The QLine, a new streetcar that was in the works before the regional plan and which relies partially on private funding, opened in 2017. Currently, discussions have started within the RTA concerning a new proposal. Early ideas have included reducing the area the authority is responsible for. The RTA has noted that roughly 28 percent of the “no” votes in the election came from more rural areas that would be less directly affected by a regional transit system. As the RTA was specifically established to build a regional transit system, enacting a plan is more than just a goal; it is do-or-die for the organization. If no plan is pushed forward, many fear the RTA will go the way of the numerous other regional planning authorities before it. While Detroit’s transit situation may be singular in its dire position, it is not the only metropolitan area that has seen a renewed interest in comprehensive mass transit. This was highlighted in the rush of dozens of cities to bid for Amazon HQ2. In Amazon’s request for proposals, it specifically stated that it was looking for a city with efficient, reliable mass transit. While this did not stop cities like Detroit from apply- ing, many will likely point to it as a reason Detroit will not get the call from Amazon. Even cities like Chicago, with well-established, well-funded mass transit, are looking to the near future for improvements. The 2018–2023 Regional Transit Strategic Plan, put forward by the Regional Transit Authority of the Chicago area, just finished an initial round of public input, and the Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning is working on the On to 2050 plan, which includes extensive regional transit guidance. Chicago also happens to be a contender for the Amazon HQ2 project, and transit has been one of its major selling points. The path ahead of the Detroit metropolitan area’s transit future is currently very unclear. Even when suburban and urban agencies were able to come together behind a comprehensive plan, their constituencies thwarted them. While the city itself has enjoyed a recent spotlight surrounding new development, particularly in its downtown, any Detroiter will tell you that the city has a long way to go to match its prosperous past. Many hope that effective transit will also help bring economic opportunity to the many who have never had it.
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D is for Design

Detroit kicks off seventh annual Design Festival
As this dust settles in Chicago after the opening of the second Chicago Architecture Biennial, things are picking up in Detroit for the seventh annual Detroit Design Festival (DDF). This year’s festival runs from September 26 through September 30 in venues all over the city. Named the United States’ only UNESCO City of Design, Detroit has a long history of creative production spanning from design through fabrication and manufacturing. Hosting this year’s event is the Detroit Creative Corridor Center (DC3). DC3 is an economic development organization focused on encouraging and connecting the city’s growing creative community. The center is a partnership between Business Leaders of Michigan and the College for Creative Studies. Every day of the festival is filled with public programming. From studio visits and gallery openings to lectures and workshops, the festival hopes to reach the widest audience possible. Some highlights include Eastern Market After Dark, the Design Village, Light Up Livernois, Hamtramck Design Showcase and Designer Putt Putt. The Design Village will take place at the Ponyride Studio in Corktown, and will present the work of Detroit designers and makers for sale on Friday and Saturday. Light Up Livernois will explore the future of Detroit’s historic fashion district, while Hamtramck Design Showcase, will be a self-guided design tour of the city within a city. Designer Putt Putt is exactly what it sounds like. Inspired by similar events in London and Los Angeles, five designers were selected to design and install fantastical putting greens at Eastern Market. The designers, who were chosen through a competition include Indigo Carr, O2, ROSSETTI, Nick Tilma and Stephan Busscher, and Ciara Lindon. The public will be able to play the course during the Eastern Market After Dark and Light Up Livernois events.
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Happy July 4!

America’s biggest and best upcoming sports stadiums
There’s nothing more American than sports, so just in time for America's birthday, here’s a look at some of the biggest stadium projects in the works—from the world's most expensive stadium to a celebrity-backed soccer field. Ford Field (Detroit Lions) The Lions’ Ford Field Stadium will be undergoing a $44 million renovation of its interiors in a project led by Detroit-based Rossetti. “Our goal has been to bring the fan experience up to standards and beyond while customizing the design for Detroit,” said Jim Renne, sports principal at Rossetti and lead designer of the original stadium. Banc of California Stadium (Los Angeles Football Club) The 22,000-seat and $250 million stadium for the LAFC is now under construction. Designed by Gensler in a "European-style" arrangement with steeply-raked and sweeping seating areas, the open-air stadium is meant to bring viewers in a closer relationship to the field and players. Oakland Raiders stadium The Oakland Raider's have purchased a 62-acre-site in Las Vegas for their new stadium, which will be designed by Kansas City, Missouri–based Manica Architecture. The stadium, which is expected to cost $77.5 million, will seat up to 65,000 people. The NFL team's move to the new stadium follows two years of drama and they plan to move in 2020, just in time for the start of the season. Quicken Loans Arena (Cleveland Cavaliers) As one of the oldest National Basketball Association (NBA) stadiums in use, the Quicken Loans Arena will get a $140 million refurbishment from SHoP Architects and Rossetti. The new design will see a new glazed facade which stretches the stadium’s footprint closer to the street edge, as well as an increase in space at the entrance and exit gangway areas. “The $140 million transformation, half of which the Cavalier’s will be paying, ensures that this public facility will remain competitive in the future,” Cleveland Mayor Frank Jackson said in a press release. David Beckham's Major League Soccer stadium Soccer star David Beckham is making moves with a Populous-designed, 25-000 seat stadium. What's catching attention, however, is not the celebrity attachment: it's that there won't be parking. Instead, fans are expected to use Metromover, Metrorail, water taxis, ridesharing, and plain-old walking to get to the stadium. LA Rams stadium Once completed in 2019, this stadium will be the world's most expensive, clocking in at a whopping $2.66 billion. Dallas-based HKS designed the new LA Rams stadium with more than 36,000 aluminum panels, which will have 20 million perforations punched into them. The perforations in the metal skin respond to the variable Southern California climate without the need for an HVAC system. This creates an effect of being outside, according to HKS. RFK Stadium In a $500 million vision to revamp the sites around the RFK Memorial Stadium after it's demolished in 2019, Events D.C., the city’s semi-independent convention and sports authority, unveiled plans to build it up with three multi-purpose athletic fields, a 47,000-square-foot food market hall, and a 350,000-square-foot indoor sports complex. “The RFK Stadium Armory-Campus—currently under-utilized—is poised to be transformed into a vibrant place that connects D.C. to the Anacostia River,” OMA partner Jason Long told the Washington Business Journal. Villanova University basketball stadium The university's basketball fans will have a new stadium to cheer on the Wildcats for the 2018-2019 season (in time for March Madness) when the renovation designed by Philadelphia-based EwingCole is completed. There will be a new lobby, concourse, and hall of fame greeting visitors. “It was important to Villanova that we celebrate the uniqueness of The Pavilion while creating an unmatched Division I basketball experience for the players and the fans,” said Bill McCullough, principal of EwingCole’s sports practice, in a prepared statement. The Texas Rangers' new Arlington, Texas ballpark Dallas-based architecture firm HKS has been chosen to design a new ballpark for the Texas Rangers baseball team. The stadium will be constructed as a public-private partnership between the team and the City of Arlington: It will serve as the Rangers’ home field and as a multipurpose arena for high school, college, and international sports. The Portland Timbers' stadium expansion Allied Works Architecture (AWA) has unveiled designs for a $50 million expansion to the 91-year-old soccer stadium in Portland, Oregon’s Providence Park, home to the Portland Timbers and Portland Thorns soccer teams. The stadium expansion, according to information on the AWA website, is conceptually inspired by William Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre in London and will aim to add roughly 4,000 seats to the existing stadium complex.
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Fly Q Detroit

Watch drone footage of the new Detroit QLINE
As service begins on the 3.3-mile stretch of Detroit’s QLINE light rail, riders will be jumping on at 20 new stations designed by Detroit-based ROSSETTI, in collaboration with AECOM. The rail runs into Downtown Detroit along Woodward Avenue between Congress Street and Grand Boulevard. New drone footage released by ROSSETTI lets you see the new station and the QLINE in action as it glides into the heart of the city. "Our goal was to create minimal and elegant structures that were both transparent and durable. We wanted the shelters to be visually identifiable as part of the QLINE rail system," Jon Disbrow, Principal and Architectural Lead at ROSSETTI, explained in a press release. "But simple enough that they would blend into the context of the various locations where they would be placed." The stations are divided into two typologies. The base station type consists of a set of amenities that are shared by all of the stations. Meanwhile, the other is designed to accommodate possible future public space, art, additional setting, bike racks, and other amenities. Each of the 98-foot-long stations is distinguished by a different color of Detroit’s Pewabic tile. In addition to this, each station is also equipped with heating for cold Detroit winters, concrete bench seating, WiFi access, security cameras, emergency phones, and ticket vending machines. The pre-cast concrete used for the stations includes an anti-graffiti admixture, and partitions are constructed out of durable laminated glass. Take a tour of the new rail line with this drone footage (below) of the new stations.
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ROSSETTI

Fabric screen connects tennis stadium to surrounding park
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Located adjacent to the New York State Pavilion—the host of the 1964 World's Fair—the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center hosts the annual US Open Tournament, one of the oldest tennis championships in the world. In an effort to better utilize the sports campus, Detroit-based ROSSETTI developed a master plan to move the Grandstand Stadium to a far corner of the grounds. The relocation expanded USTA's leasable land into Flushing Meadows Corona Park.
  • Facade Manufacturer Birdair
  • Architects ROSSETTI
  • Facade Installer Birdair
  • Facade Consultants Birdair; WSP (structural engineer)
  • Location Queens, NY
  • Date of Completion 2016
  • System steel frame with PTFE fabric
  • Products custom made PTFE fabric
To mediate between this historic park setting and the tennis campus, ROSSETTI designed a unique exterior skin pattern that metaphorically evokes the translucency of leafy tree canopies and the twisting dynamics of the tennis serve. The material selected, a Teflon-coated fiberglass membrane, polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)­, is typically used for roofing applications but in this case, a woven version allows for a more translucent breathable effect. The facade assembly is composed of 486 panels, totaling over 26,000 square feet, that fasten to a cable structure with parametric geometry. The system was designed with computational solver software to streamline design and constructability, ultimately saving an enormous amount of time and money in the project. Matt Taylor, design lead at ROSSETTI, said that early on in the design process, the team tried to mimic the faceted geometry of the structure, by ultimately ended up with a curvilinear form: "Even though this was a very complex facade, we had to simplify it to a point where it was repeatable, structurally feasible, and that the detailing could be economic enough to stay within budget." Pierre Roberson, a technical designer at ROSSETTI, led the effort to optimize and simplify detailing of the system. He said the structure of the building was not symmetrical but rather based on spline geometry with an infinite number of radii, and that the key to optimizing the facade was about producing a series of modular components that approximated the perimeter shape. Roberson split the spline of the ring beams into 16 equal segments, finding optimal radii for each segment. After optimizing the beam geometry, Roberson used Galapagos, a parametric tool in Grasshopper3d, to find an ideal strut length from over 1,000 of the individual panel supports. This process standardized the length and angle of the facade strut geometry, which allowed the team to provide models for the shop fabricators, who were able to attach connection points to the ring beams at the same angle. Early on in the process, working with PTFE manufacturer Birdair, ROSSETTI mocked up details using PVC pipes and in-house 3d-printed connection components to test and resolve details in full scale. This became a transportable design, presentation, and technical tool that allowed the connection between the PTFE panel and the steel strut to evolve into an elegant functional expression. Taylor said the mockups led to design changes through a collaborative process between the architect and manufacturer. "Birdair was great to work with—they were up to the challenge of this design." The actual fabric shapes were directed by Birdair’s dimensional and formal requirements. For example, a doubly-curved surface geometry is easier to tension than a standard planar surface. Also, by maintaining a specific dimension of 5-by-10 feet avoided the visual clutter of seams running through the panels. "We could have specified a large panel size and worked a secondary seam pattern onto the panels, but we thought this was a much more elegant solution," said Taylor, adding, "there's something really nice about the pedestrian scale of the panels."
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Lion's Den

Detroit Lions reveal $44 million interiors revamp for Ford Field
The Detroit Lions have unveiled designs for a $44 million renovation of Ford Field’s hospitality areas. Leading the design is Detroit-based ROSSETTI. The firm was also responsible for the original design of the stadium, which opened in 2002. The comprehensive renovation will affect every aspect of the fan experience throughout the stadium. A total of 210,000 square feet—from large social clubs to suites and loges—will be included in the project. The Lions brand and the slogan ("Nothing Stops Detroit") are guiding the graphic concepts throughout the renovation. The spaces will be filled with layers of the team’s logo and graphics, along with textures, furniture, finishes, and curated displays which will be constructed by local craftsman and artisans. “We used many innovative concepts for Ford Field when we originally designed the stadium and that’s why it has stood the test of time,” said Jim Renne, sports principal at ROSSETTI and lead designer of the original stadium, in an announcement. “We’re thrilled to bring our knowledge about entertainment venues garnered from designing facilities around the world back to our hometown. Our goal has been to bring the fan experience up to standards and beyond while customizing the design for Detroit.” The design team was inspired by the surrounding neighborhood and urban setting of the stadium. Lighting, materiality, and details were created to “feel familiar yet will be completely different for fans.” The southern side of the project takes cues from Detroit’s history, while the northern side is influenced by the auto industry and midcentury modern design. The renovation is expected to be complete in August 2017, in time for the opening of the 2017/2018 NFL season. Along with the interior, the stadium will also receive scoreboard and technology upgrades.
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Loudville? Really?

SHoP to give the Cleveland Cavaliers’ basketball arena a huge overhaul

New York–based SHoP Architects working alongside Detroit-based stadia specialists Rossetti are to give the Quicken Loans Arena a massive makeover. The stadium, known as "The Q," has been open since 1994 and is home to the Cleveland Cavaliers. While a new arena would cost up to $750 million (according to Quicken Loans), the proposed refurbishment is set to total $140 million.

The Cavs will pay $70 million of this, plus any overrunning constructions costs. The rest will come from the City of Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, and Destination Cleveland. Work will begin next year and the stadium will remain open during this period; the Cavs will keep The Q as their home until 2034.

Despite only being 22-years-old, The Quicken Loans Arena is one of the oldest facilities in use on the National Basketball Association circuit. SHoP and Rossetti's design features a new glazed facade which stretches the stadium's footprint closer to the street edge. This fenestration reveals an undulating arrangement of what appears to be wood panels which, given their location well inside the facade and north-facing orientation, don't seem to serve any shading purpose. Aside from aesthetics, entrance and exit gangway areas will witness an increase in space, thus aiding circulation—a necessity considering The Q hosts more than 200 events every year.

“The $140 million transformation, half of which the Cavalier’s will be paying, ensures that this public facility will remain competitive in the future,” Cleveland mayor Frank Jackson said in a press release. “This investment provides an innovative solution for extending the use and impact of The Q for years and years to come without the need for a much more expensive new arena. In addition, the seven year extension of the Cavalier’s lease through 2034 will represent one of the longest tenures in the same facility in all of sports.” Mayor Jackson, however, appears to be forgetting the wealth of stadia (for rugby, soccer, and cricket) in Europe and Australia that have endured for well over a century. Even Fenway Park in Boston and Wrigley Field in Chicago—home to the Red Sox and Cubs baseball teams respectively, surpass 100 years. Heck, the Indians' Progressive Field—a mere 200 feet away from The Q—opened six months before its basketball counterpart (sorry Jackson). Meanwhile, NBA Deputy Commissioner Mark Tatum said: “We understand the impact this project will have in continuing the great momentum we have all seen recently in the city. We look forward to holding our week of NBA All-Star events in Cleveland in the near future following the successful completion of The Q transformation project.”