Search results for "IdeasCity"

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New Ideas

V. Mitch McEwen is the next curator of IdeasCity
Princeton Professor V. Mitch McEwen has been named the new curator of IdeasCity, a collaborative and creative platform run by the New Museum in New York City that “addresses challenges and opportunities arising in urban reconstruction,” according to the initiative’s website. McEwen will be working on the IdeasCity biennial, leading a platform for designers, artists, technologists, and policymakers to collaborate on ideas and solutions in exploring the future of cities. According to a statement from the New Museum, McEwen “will steer the framework for the 2018-19 cities and launch an open call for cities around the world to apply for the 2020-21 cycle." McEwen is the principal and cofounder of A(n) Office, a Detroit- and New York-based studio that explores topics of architecture and exhibition with partner Marcelo López-Dinard. McEwen received grants from the Graham Foundation, the Knight Foundation, and the New York State Council on the Arts and has exhibited work as part of the U.S. Pavilion at the Venice Architecture Biennale, the Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit, and the Istanbul Design Biennial. In addition to holding an assistant professorship at Princeton University School of Architecture, McEwen has taught at the University of Michigan, and Columbia Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation. McEwen stated, “The New Museum, an institution founded by curators, has consistently advocated for artists as idea leaders. IdeasCity brings that ethos to the streets and a broader public to accelerate the kind of creative knowledge-sharing that opens new possibilities in our everyday lives. There’s a responsibility right now—at this seemingly precarious moment—to not be shy or afraid, but to be bolder than ever and make the most of the connections we have with each other.” McEwen tells AN that she is thrilled to collaborate with the New Museum team to curate the upcoming cycle of IdeasCity, which connects directly to the work she does as a designer and professor of architecture who “engages with the intersection of technology, ecology, urban culture, and spatial politics.” According to Princeton SoA’s website, “McEwen Studio projects in Detroit have produced a series of operations on houses previously owned by the Detroit Land Bank Authority. These include a combined residence and flower incubator for an engineer at 3M, a strategy for 100 houses selected by the City of Detroit to densify the neighborhood of Fitzgerald, and an award-winning repurposing of a balloon-frame house titled House Opera.” McEwen begins the new position this month.
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New Ideas

New Museum and NEON announce IdeasCity Athens speakers and fellows
The New Museum is partnering with the contemporary art non-profit NEON to present IdeasCity Athens, a five-day residency program culminating in a public conference at the Athens Conservatory in Greece. Forty fellows will live and work at the conservatory to observe the state of the city and work towards addressing the problems it faces. The fellows' work culminates in a free conference on September 24. The Architect's Newspaper was on the ground this spring for IdeasCity Detroit (see our comprehensive coverage here.) Programs have also been held in New York, Istanbul, and Sao Paulo. The platform was started by Lisa Phillips and Karen Wong, director and deputy director of The New Museum. John Akomfrah, Tania Bruguera, dream hampton, George Prevelakis, Nick Srnicek, and Hito Steyerl are among the speakers at the conference. Check out the IdeasCity website for more information about the Athens fellows and upcoming programs. The full list of fellow and speakers, taken from a recent press release, follows below. IdeasCity Athens Speakers Yaşar Adanalı is an urbanist, researcher, and lecturer based in Istanbul. He is a cofounder of Center for Spatial Justice Beyond Istanbul, a cross-disciplinary urban institute that works on issues of spatial justice in Turkey. Additionally, Adanalı teaches courses in participatory planning at Technical University of Darmstadt and in urban political ecology at Koç University in Istanbul. John Akomfrah is an artist and filmmaker based in London. His work has been exhibited at the Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum, Tate Britain, the Museum of Modern Art, the Hayward Gallery, the 2015 Venice Biennale, and the 2012 Taipei Biennial, among other venues. Additionally, Akomfrah’s films have been featured in the 2013 Sundance Film Festival and the 2012 Toronto International Film Festival. Tania Bruguera is a performance artist based in New York and Havana. Bruguera has exhibited her work at the 2015 Venice Biennale, Tate Modern, and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, among other places. Since 2015, she has been the artist in residence in the New York City Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs. Additionally, Bruguera is the initiator of Instituto de Artivismo Hannah Arendt in Havana. Thomas Doxiadis is an architect and landscape designer based in Athens. He is the founder of doxiadis+, an architecture office that works on urban interventions, landscape restoration, and policy. Currently Doxiadis is Chair of the Natural Environment Council of the Greek Society for Natural and Cultural Preservation. Rosanne Haggerty is a community development leader based in New York. Haggerty is the founder of Common Ground, a not-for-profit organization that works with cities to design new approaches to health, housing, and community challenges. She is a recipient of the MacArthur Foundation Award and was awarded the Jane Jacobs Medal for New Ideas and Activism from the Rockefeller Foundation. dream hampton is a filmmaker, writer, and organizer from Detroit. Point Supreme Architects is a design studio based in Athens. It was founded in Rotterdam by Konstantinos Pantazis and Marianna Rentzou in 2007. Their work integrates research, architecture, urbanism, landscape, and urban design. The studio’s work has been exhibited at the 2015 Chicago Biennial, the 2012 Venice Architecture Biennale, and Storefront for Art and Architecture. George Prevelakis is a political scientist and geographer based in Paris. Prevelakis is Professor of Geopolitics and Cultural Geography at the Sorbonne University, Paris. Previously, he has served as the Greek Permanent Representative at the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. He is Codirector of the French journal Anatoli and a regular contributor to the Athens daily newspaper Kathimerini. Nick Srnicek is a writer and educator based in London. Srnicek is Lecturer in International Political Economy at City University London and the author of Platform Capitalism and, with Alex Williams,Inventing the Future: Postcapitalism and a World Without Work, a new manifesto for a high-tech future free from work. Currently, he is writing After Work: What’s Left and Who Cares? Hito Steyerl is a writer and filmmaker based in Berlin. She is Professor of New Media Art at the Berlin University of the Arts. Steyerl’s work has been exhibited at Artists Space, Institute of Contemporary Arts, and the Art Institute of Chicago, among other places. Additionally, Steyerl contributes regularly to the online arts journal e-flux. Pelin Tan is a historian and sociologist based in Turkey. Tan is Associate Professor in Architecture at Mardin Artuklu University in Istanbul. In 2015, she curated “Adhocracy – Athens” for the Onassis Cultural Center and was a board member of the Greek Pavilion at the Venice Biennale. Additionally, Tan co-runs the project Autonomous Infrastructure for the 2017 Oslo Architecture Triennial. IdeasCity Athens Fellows Kafilat Adeola Aderemi is an activist and researcher based in Athens. She is a research assistant at Yale University and works as a yoga therapist for Melissa Network, an organization for migrant women that drives integration and capacity building in Athens. Antonia Alampi is an art historian, curator, and writer based in Berlin. Her work has been published inart-agenda, Arte e Critica, and Flash Art International, among other magazines. Alampi previously worked at Beirut, an art initiative and exhibition space in Cairo. Elina Axioti is an artist and researcher based in Berlin. She is a current PhD candidate at Humboldt University and previously worked as Assistant Curator for the exhibition “Heaven Live” at the 2009 Athens Biennial. Haris Biskos is an architect based in Athens. He is the founder of Traces of Commerce, an initiative that repurposes the vacant storefronts of Athens, and Program Coordinator at synAthina, a social innovation platform. Sasha Bonét is a writer and activist based in New York. Her writing has appeared in Guernica magazine,AFAR magazine, and the Feminist Wire, among other publications. Bonét is currently working on a collection of essays on radical black feminism. James Bridle is an artist and writer based in Athens. Bridle’s work focuses on the impact of technology on culture and society. He contributes to the Guardian, Frieze magazine, the Atlantic, Vice, and Domus, and has lectured internationally. Maria-Thalia Carras is a curator and cultural producer based in Athens. She is a cofounder of the nonprofit contemporary arts organization Locus Athens. Previously, Carras was Assistant Curator of “Outlook: International Art Exhibition” in Athens. Dario Calmese is a photographer and artist based in New York. He is a regular writer on style and culture for the Huffington Post and the Daily Beast. Calmese currently sits on the advisory board of the Museum at the Fashion Institute of Technology. Amy Chester is a civic organizer based in New York. She is Managing Director of Rebuild by Design, where she focuses on design and community engagement. Previously, she worked for the New York City Housing Authority and the Office of the Mayor in New York. Manolis Daskalakis-Lemos is an artist based in Athens. Currently, he is in residence at the Palais de Tokyo’s Pavillon Neuflize OBC. His work has been exhibited at the Benaki Museum, LUMA Westbau, the Serpentine Galleries, and the Athens Biennial, among other venues. Stamatia Dimitrakopoulos is a curator and writer based in Athens. She is Curator of the Breeder residency program. Previously, Dimitrakopoulos worked for the Greek Pavilion at the 2015 Venice Biennale and the 2017 Athens Biennial. Sofia Dona is an architect and artist based in Athens and Munich. She is a PhD candidate at the University of Thessaly in Greece and has participated in the Athens Biennial, the São Paulo Biennial of Architecture, and the Istanbul Design Biennial. iLiana Fokianaki is an art critic and curator based in Athens. She is the founder of State of Concept, a nonprofit gallery in Athens. Fokianaki has written for LEAP, ART PAPERS, and Monocle, among other publications. Ayasha Guerin is an artist and scholar based in New York. She is a PhD candidate at New York University, where she is focusing on urban environmental studies. Currently, she is also a Fellow at the Museum of the City of New York. Olga Hatzidaki is a curator and cultural producer based in Athens. She is a cofounder of the nonprofit contemporary arts organization Locus Athens. In 2007, Hatzidaki was a curatorial assistant at the Athens Biennial. Zoe Hatziyannaki is an artist based in Athens. She is a member of the collective Depression Era and the artist-led studio and project space A-Dash. Hatziyannaki’s work has been published and exhibited globally. Victoria Ivanova is a curator and writer based in London. She is a cofounder of Real Flow, a platform for art and finance in New York, and IZOLYATSIA, a cultural center in Donetsk, Ukraine. Previously, she was Assistant Curator for Public Programmes at Tate Modern. Stefan Jovanovic is a designer and artist based in London. He is currently in residence at Sadler’s Wells Theatre and is working at ImPulsTanz in Vienna with Tino Sehgal. Jovanovic has performed at Musée de la danse at Tate Modern, among other places. Mathias Klenner is an architect and university lecturer based in Santiago, Chile. He is a cofounder of the architecture collective TOMA. Klenner’s work has been exhibited in various venues, including the 2015 Chicago Biennial. Marily Konstantinopoulou is an arts professional based in New York. She currently works in the Museum of Modern Art’s R&D Department. Previously, she was a consultant at the Hellenic Parliament for the Standing Committee on Cultural and Educational Affairs. Ben Landau is an artist and designer based in Melbourne, Australia. Landau lectures at RMIT University in Melbourne and has exhibited his work in the Biennial of Design Ljubljana, the Istanbul Design Biennial, Bureau Europa, and the Lisbon Architecture Triennial. Jimenez Lai is an architect based in Los Angeles. He is the founder of Bureau Spectacular, an architecture group that focuses on cartoons, storytelling, and communication. Lai designed the Taiwan Pavilion at the Venice Architecture Biennale in 2014. Constantine Lemos is an architect based in London. He has worked on design projects in Dubai and Istanbul for Anouska Hempel, construction projects in Abu Dhabi, and shipbuilding in Greece. Fei Liu is a designer and artist based in New York. She is a 2016–17 member of the New Museum’s art, design, and technology incubator, NEW INC. Liu curates a podcast and music show at Bel-Air, an artist-run online radio station in Brooklyn. Juan López-Aranguren is an architect and civic designer based in Madrid. He is a cofounder of the artist and architecture collective Basurama. López-Aranguren has exhibited and built projects internationally. Marcelo López-Dinardi is an architect and educator based in New York. He is a partner of A(n) Office, a design and curatorial practice that was selected to represent the United States at the 2016 Venice Architecture Biennale. Kosmas Nikolaou is an artist based in Athens. He is a cofounder of 3 137, an artist-run space in Athens. His work has been exhibited at the Benaki Museum, the National Museum of Contemporary Art, Enterprise Projects, and Rebecca Camhi Gallery in Athens, among other venues. Michael MacGarry is a visual artist and filmmaker based in Johannesburg. He is a PhD candidate at the University of the Witwatersrand and has exhibited his work at Tate Modern, Guggenheim Bilbao, Kiasma Museum, and Iziko South African National Gallery. Tiff Massey is an artist and activist based in Detroit. Her work explores class, race, and contemporary culture through the lens of African adornment. Massey is a 2015 Kresge Visual Arts Fellowship awardee and John S. and James L. Knight Foundation grant recipient. Shawn McLearen is a community real estate developer based in New York. He is the founder and President of Placeful, a nonprofit organization that focuses on socially responsible partnerships. Sean Monahan is an artist and writer based in New York and Los Angeles. He is a cofounder of the trend-forecasting group K-HOLE. Monahan has worked with Virgin Group, MTV, the New Museum, MoMA P.S.1, Casper, and the 2016 Berlin Biennial, among other organizations. Ilias Papageorgiou is an architect based in New York. He is a partner at SO – IL, an architecture studio that envisions spaces for culture, learning, and innovation. Papageorgiou has taught at the Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation at Columbia University. Fortuné Penniman is an architect based in Dubai. He is a cofounder of the design and research practice A Hypothetical Office. In 2016 he graduated with honors from the Architectural Association School of Architecture in London. Eduardo Pérez is an architect and manufacturer based in Santiago, Chile. He is a cofounder of the architecture collective TOMA. Pérez has exhibited his work at the 2015 Chicago Biennial, among other venues. Danielle Rosales is a graphic designer and sociologist based in Paris. She is Design Researcher at Civic City and a cofounder of Spatial Codes. Rosales’s work was featured in the 2016 Venice Architecture Biennale. Maria Stanisheva is a documentary filmmaker based in New York. She is the founder of FINDING HOME, an online storytelling platform for displaced communities. Stanisheva’s work has been featured on Euronews and in the New York Times and the Independent. Hakan Topal is an artist based in Brooklyn, New York. He is Assistant Professor of New Media and Art+Design at SUNY Purchase College, and his work has been exhibited at the Gwangju Biennial, the Istanbul Biennial, the Venice Biennale, and MoMA P.S.1. Francis Tseng is a designer and software engineer based in New York. He is a 2016–17 member of the New Museum’s art, design, and technology incubator, NEW INC. Previously, Tseng worked for the New York Times and the Washington Post. Jonida Turani is an architect and curator based in Venice and Tirana, Albania. She is Codirector of Beyond Entropy Balkans, a nonprofit platform for art, architecture, and geopolitics. In 2014 she co-curated the Albanian Pavilion at the Venice Architecture Biennale. Rebecca Bucky Willis is an architectural designer based in Detroit. She is the founder of Bleeding Heart Design, a nonprofit organization that sets out to inspire altruism. Previously, she worked at the Detroit Collaborative Design Center at the University of Detroit Mercy School of Architecture.
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City of Ideas

In Detroit, IdeasCity explores the role of culture in making cities more fair and successful

“We are not here to fix Detroit’s problems. We are here to learn from Detroit. This is a learning platform,” said Joseph Grima. Grima, the director of IdeasCity, a symposium hosted by the New York–based New Museum, sat in a circle flanked by mostly-young artists, activists, and designers in a utility building on the grounds of a shuttered city-owned hospital. For over two hours, the group reacted to the first days of the laboratory, an exhaustive schedule of talks, debates, and tours, to discuss its role in Detroit. A postindustrial hipster summer camp this is not: Participants used the six-day event as a space to discuss the role of culture in making cities more vibrant, equitable spaces.

The latest iteration of IdeasCity included a five-day collaborative laboratory starting on April 25, and concluded with a daylong public conference on April 30. 41 fellows, culled from a global open call, were asked to work in small groups to explore and ruminate on the future of Detroit. Each group was assigned a site to anchor its thinking, although ideas could, and did, bleed beyond cartographic boundaries and into conceptual deliverables. Locals led tours of the sites to help fellows, especially the two-thirds majority not from Detroit, understand the depth of the history that contributes to the city’s present morphology. A stream of regional expert presenters, such as Elysia Borowy-Reeder, executive director of MOCAD and Malik Yakini, executive director of the Detroit Black Community Food Security Network, placed visitors face-to-face with Detroiters to talk about what they love about their hometown and what needs to change.

The culmination of IdeasCity was the conference held at the Jam Handy, an event space in the New Center neighborhood. Opening keynote presentations were delivered by Detroit director of planning and development Maurice Cox, while Chicago-based artists Theaster Gates and Amanda Williams set the tone for the day.

Panel discussions focused on the power and importance of cultural production as a means of urban prosperity. Local experts such as filmmaker-writer dream hampton and community organizer Jenny Lee emphasized the need to change the narrative around what is, and what should be, happening in Detroit. This theme would permeate much of the day, as panelists, presenters, and fellows alike enlightened the crowd on topics often overlooked in the discussion of Detroit.

Fellows brought both knowledge from their home cities and newfound information to their presentations. Multiple groups advocated for the reexamination of current development plans. The first group situated the planned Gordie Howe Bridge to Canada, in terms of air, water, and soil, as it affected Fort Wayne, a Civil War–era site and recreation area in the Delray neighborhood. Fort Wayne is a First Nations burial site, heavily polluted by surrounding industry, but enjoyed for the water access it affords locals. “Having family in the area, I want to make sure that they are not forgotten,” noted fellow Stacy’e Jones, DJ and member of Liquid Flow Media Arts Center.

Another group took a look at the solar panel farm in O‘Shea, arguing that the recently constructed power station, built on former parkland, should have been envisioned as an integrated part of the neighborhood in a dense housing and agricultural mix. "We wanted to make sure we were reaching out to the community. There was a lot of tension in the room. The community was brought in at the very end of this process," explained Taylor Renee Aldridge, Detroiter and co-editor of ARTS.BLACK.

One design-oriented proposal looked at memorializing the spaces of conflict on the site of what is now Mies van der Rohe’s cooperative community, Lafayette Park. Formerly known as Black Bottom, a neighborhood for newly arrived black residents, the area was bulldozed and reset, tabula rasa, for Mies’s modernist project in 1946. “We wanted to recognize Black Bottom, because at this time there is no physical form of memorialization there,” fellow and Detroit writer Marsha Music explained. Against a backdrop of historical images of a thriving, and then destroyed Black Bottom, the group proposed non-affirmative monuments that encourage dialogue around the themes of immaterial culture, the social culture of street life, and the city’s churches. Group member Tommy Haddock observed that housing is what ties people to place, and that themes of belonging and removal can be reflected through the motif of house and home. An architect, Haddock realized some of the group’s ideas in a series of renderings that reference the visual language of Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown.

Other groups addressed less physical ideas. One simply, yet boldly, proclaimed that their project was to return to their respective homes around the world to act as Detroit ambassadors, spreading their newly enlightened views of the city. “Architecture,” explained Paris designer Pinar Demirdag, “isn’t about telling what to build, sometimes it’s about telling what not to build.”

Ryan Myers-Johnson, a dancer and founder of Sidewalk Festival of Performing Arts, noted that “It’s easier to ask for forgiveness than permission when working with the City of Detroit.” Her group addressed the interaction of the city government, law enforcement, and non-traditional community-led organizations to propose a special project permit which would streamline the bureaucratic red tape surrounding the approval process for public events.

But what does this all mean for Detroit? There was obvious mutual respect and appreciation between residents and visitors and an atmosphere of profound but critical optimism at the conference and in the days leading up to it. The ambassador group had the most actionable presentation, as they will take their new perspectives back home, hopefully working from within their positions of influence to broaden others’ perceptions of Detroit and similar post-industrial cities.

“Idea” has roots in Greek, idein, meaning “to see.” So perhaps, as Grima stressed, the true point of the event was to see more clearly into the patterns and processes that shape the city. It’s worth noting that IdeasCity chooses “dysfunctional” cities for their forums. This would seem like a trap for offering prescriptive advice, yet  the organizers work diligently to make sure that prescriptions are on the menu, but not the de facto option. Although some groups chose a “problem” and proposed a “solution,” They were presented with enough insider information to dispense careful, thoughtful advice.

September will find Ideas City exploring Athens, where the event’s ethos will once again be put to the test.

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Diana Balmori’s Meditation Room at IDEASCity 2015 explores the possibility of expansive horizons in crowded cities
Stemming from the idea that a city is but a stack of layered horizons, landscape architect Diana Balmori’s public installation for IDEASCity 2015 invites the viewer to contemplate where horizons occur in a pause-for-thought experience. Meditation Room: Horizon is a continuous constructed wall of paper where the overlapping of two dot matrix systems creates a visible horizon slightly above eye level. Presented by The Drawing Center, the installation expounds the revelations set forth in Balmori's book Drawing and Reinventing Landscape (2014), which explores horizon and peripheral vision to decode how designers perceive landscape and draw it accordingly. “The physical response to what you look at is vital; it activates the seeing,” Balmori wrote. The pleasure of drawing, she then muses, does not come from the act itself but “from enormous concentration essential to the act of drawing; from the intense looking that produces interior quiet and an imagined silence around you.” At the heart of Meditation Room is the concept that the landscape architect’s onus is to create a sense of expansive horizons within a city’s modest spaces. The piece will be installed at the Sara D. Roosevelt Park on the Lower East Side at Chrystie and Houston street on May 30 from 12–6pm. Balmori is the founder of New York–based Balmori Associates, an internationally recognized landscape architecture firm. An activist for sustainable architecture, Balmori is currently campaigning to widen and landscape the Broadway median between 72nd and 136th street to create a path with solar panels and wind turbines powered by the slipstream of passing cars.
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OMG

OMA to design New Museum expansion
The New Museum has selected OMA to design a new building right next to its current home on the Bowery. Rem Koolhaas and Shohei Shigematsu are designing the expansion at 231 Bowery, a museum–owned property that currently houses an incubator program and private artist lofts. The building, funded through an $85 million capital campaign, will be integrated into the museum's current home, a structure by SANAA that opened in 2007. Despite authoring Delirious New York, Koolhaas will just now be designing his first public building in the city. Set to break ground in 2019, the addition will boost the museum's floor space by 50,000 square feet. The extra room will accommodate more galleries, improve circulation, and add "flexible space" for signature programming like IdeasCityNEW INC, and Rhizome, as well as other events. “Having collaborated with Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa on a number of projects in Europe, it is a real honor to stand alongside their great work of architecture, one of my favorites in the city," said OMA Founding Principal Rem Koolhaas, in a prepared statement. “I am honored to be awarded this project in the city perhaps most central to OMA's philosophy, and am thrilled to work with an institution that deeply values the practices of creative forward-thinkers," added Shohei Shigematsu, partner and leader of OMA's New York office. "As a Japanese architect, I am very happy to engage in a unique dialogue with SANAA and build alongside one of their seminal works.” Founded in 1977, the museum is the only institution in the city that exclusively displays contemporary art. It announced plans to grow its footprint back in May 2016, and since then, the museum has raised more than half the funds it needs to pay for the expansion. At that time, it said 231 Bowery would not be demolished. The Architect's Newspaper (AN) reached out to the New Museum to get a date for the design unveiling, and find out whether the museum plans to keep the current building, which houses NEW INC as well as artist live/work spaces. A spokesperson said design development will take eight months and details will be shared at the end of the process.
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Instagram Eavesdrop

David Adjaye in Finland, contemporary wigwams, and other updates from the architects of Instagram
At The Architect’s Newspaper, we’re plain addicted to Instagram. Sure, we love seeing Brutalist concrete through “Inkwell” or “Ludwig” filters, but there’s also no better place to see where architects are getting their inspiration, how they’re documenting the built environment, and where they’ve traveled of late. Below, we bring you some of the best Instagrams of this past week! (Also, don’t forget to check out our Instagram account here.) It was a busy weekend in New York. In Sara D. Roosevelt Park on Saturday morning, the New Museum's latest iteration of IdeasCity kicked off with a host of temporary wooden structures hosting keynotes by speakers like Trevor Paglen, who lectured on visual recognition technologies. https://www.instagram.com/p/BZG5fWFhG4W/?taken-by=ideascity Later, on Saturday night, Storefront for Art and Architecture opened their new exhibit Souvenirs: New York IconsMore than 59 artists, architects, and designers were asked to create souvenirs for each of the city's community districts. It was so crowded we had to escape through the Holl in the wall. https://www.instagram.com/p/BZTw_02nC1c/?taken-by=oma.eu Across the pond, OMA posted renderings of their designs for Amsterdam's Schiphol Airport, clutch the pearls. https://www.instagram.com/p/BZQy_0sHBIt/?taken-by=3xn_gxn Danish firm 3XN demonstrated how their new children's hospital design was inspired by the movement of two hands opening. https://www.instagram.com/p/BZTYEh-AjFr/?taken-by=ekeneijeoma Artist Ekene Ijeoma announced he had created a new sculpture focusing on New York's immigrant community while reposting another sculpture we wrote about a while back that mapped out where low-wage workers can afford the rent, essentially forming islands of affordability. Still very relevant. https://www.instagram.com/p/BZNkVlflw7v/?taken-by=adjaye_visual_sketchbook We don't have favorites, but our perennial fave Sir David Adjaye has the best feed of all. He recently posted from the Aalto University in Finland—a beautiful little chapel by Hiekki and Kaija Siren from 1957. Take that, Louisiana Museum (1958). https://www.instagram.com/p/BZOy-16HlJf/?taken-by=exhibitcolumbus Jetting seamlessly back to rural Indiana, Exhibit Columbus highlighted a contemporary wigwam made of copper scales by Chris Cornelius of studio:indigenous. That's it for today, hashtag archilovers and quote-on-quote gallerinas. See you next week for more drama.
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Instagram Eavesdrop

Globular zoos, air-filtering musicians, and other updates from the architects of Instagram
At The Architect’s Newspaper, we’re plain addicted to Instagram. Sure, we love seeing Brutalist concrete through “Inkwell” or “Ludwig” filters, but there’s also no better place to see where architects are getting their inspiration, how they’re documenting the built environment, and where they’ve traveled of late. Below, we bring you some of the best Instagrams of this past week! (Also, don’t forget to check out our Instagram account here.)

The Chicago Architecture Biennale kicked off on September 16, and there are lots of costumes. Ana Prvacki and SO-IL collaborated on "L'air pour l'air," a sculptural performance in which wind musicians wore air-filtering enclosures meant to "clean the air that produces the music" like the plants in the surrounding conservatory.

Meanwhile, at Exhibit Columbus, IKD's Conversation Plinth plays a central role with its concentric wooden platforms hosting performances, programs, and public dialogue on the plaza outside an I.M. Pei-designed library. Before heading to Chicago for preliminary festivities, renowned architectural photographer Iwan Baan paid a visit to Yale's Skidmore, Owings & Merrill-designed Beinecke Library (1963), which is covered entirely in panels of translucent marble restored last September. Okay, okay. At this point we've done too many bouncy castle posts. Instead, here's another Never Built New York gem over at the Queens Museum, via our friends at Archtober: Samuel Friede's 1906 proposal for a globular zoo at Coney Island. It contains elephants, a restaurant, and a 50,000 room hotel (#practicalspending). Joseph Grima, former director of Storefront for Art and Architecture and founder of Space Caviar, geared up for IdeasCity New York in Sara D. Roosevelt Park – a New Museum initiative that has previously hosted events in Detroit, Athens, and Arles. Musician David Byrne of Talking Heads fame will give the closing keynote. Landscape architecture dream team SCAPE has been selected as to participate in Resilient By Design's Bay Area Challenge. Their team, Public Sediment, partners with Arcadis, the Dredge Research Collaborative, TS Studio, the UC Davis Department of Human Ecology and Design, the UC Davis Center for Watershed Sciences, and the Buoyant Ecologies Lab. One last Chicago Architecture Biennial post and we're done (for now). Best for last: the long-awaited collaboration between artist Nick Cave and architect Jeanne Gang turned out to be as colorful and wild as expected, entitled Here Hear Chicago. Performers wearing Cave's well-known "soundsuits" meandered through a Studio Gang-designed set of buoys, scored by composer Kahil El’Zabar. For a video sample, head over to our Instagram.
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The New New

New Museum to expand into adjacent building on the Bowery

The New Museum will double in size in time for its 40th birthday next year, as it expands into next-door 231 Bowery, which is currently offices, a gallery, and artists' live/work space owned by the museum.

The museum announced yesterday that it had raised $43 million of the $80 million needed to pay for the expansion and to triple the endowment. Although the funds seem modest in comparison to the MoMA (annual operating budget: $147 million) or the Whitney, the capital campaign is the largest in the New Museum's history. The $80 million will also pay for the institution's business incubator, New INC, and programs like IdeasCity, which bring artists, activists, planners, and policymakers together to discuss issues facing cities like Detroit and Athens, Greece.

Lisa Phillips, the museum's director, told The New York Times that “we’ve known for a long time that we wanted an expansion, but we’ve been thinking about what an expansion means for a museum like this. We own the building next door, and it just makes sense to use it. But it was also about thinking about ways to create a parallel structure there, to make something that’s different and a counterpoint to this building.”

Since the museum's move to Soho in 2007, annual attendance has increased from 60,000 to over 400,000. The museum intends to renovate 231 Bowery and connect it to their main Sanaa–designed space, increasing the total footprint from 58,000 square feet to over 100,000. As of now, there are no plans to demolish 231 Bowery. The expansion will allow for improved circulation, and keep exhibitions on view during turnaround periods: The New Museum has a tiny permanent collection, choosing instead to focus on women artists and art that's not usually exhibited in New York.

“I don’t have [the expansion] completely laid out,” Phillips told the Times, “but it’s about trying to do things that museums haven’t done yet or maybe even imagined.”

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This tree-canopy office in London is up for rent—and rallying for the political rights of nature
A treetop office in East London’s Hoxton Square park has more in mind than upping worker productivity by exposure to natural light and flora—it’s a political proponent for the rights of nature. Artist, engineer, and New York University professor Natalie Jeremijenko designed the lightweight structure together with artists Shuster + Mosely and architects Tate Harmer. The coworking space can accommodate six to eight occupants simultaneously and is outfitted with Wifi and a power supply. “As a place to work, I can’t think of a better office. It’s a beautiful, airy, delicious space in amongst the chaos of public space,” Jeremijenko told Fast Company. However, the concept’s cherry on top is the tree-as-landlord business model in that tenant's rents are reinvested into the maintenance of the park, the greening of the surrounding area and upkeep of the tree itself. The dollar value of a tree can be computed by quantifying its environmental “services.” These include improving air quality, sequestering carbon, and conserving energy use in buildings by providing shade. In New York City, the monetary virtues of a tree are a measly $400 for 80 years of service, but Jeremijenko believes in the message her project implicitly asserts. “By making it specifically about the tree and what kind of revenue the tree can generate, we’re really exploring a larger political discussion of what are the rights of nature,” she said. Jeremijenko erected a similar contraption in Berlin and one in Socrates Square Park, Long Island City, as part of the Civic Action exhibition in 2012. In a statement on the Civic Action website, Jeremijenko exhorted readers to consider her rhetoric: if the 14th amendment grants personhood to corporations, why shouldn’t trees be extended the same legal entitlement? “If non-human organisms own property, will that change their explicit value in a market-based participatory democracy?” she wrote. TREExOFFICE was launched during the 2 Degrees Festival from 1–7 June where Jeremijenko was the official artist-in-residence, but the outdoor office space is available for rent until December 2015. Use of the arboreal office can be booked online, while local community groups can reserve it free of charge on weekends. Renting a desk for a half day weekday costs $23, while the entire space costs $120.
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Bike to work without the smog: the Clean Ride Mapper helps Canadian cyclists find quieter, less polluted bike routes
In urban canyons where tall buildings on both sides occlude sunlight, pollution, too, is prevented from dispersing. The Clean Ride Mapper is an interactive map that allows cyclists to choose quieter cycling routes with reduced traffic and pollution levels. After inputting starting point and destination, users are shown three color-coded routes—green being the cleanest (as measured by cumulative exposure to nitrogen dioxide and ultrafine particles from fuel combustion), blue the most direct, and red the quietest as gauged by average traffic density the cyclist is likely to encounter. The map is powered by a dataset of air quality indices acquired over four years using $60,000 air-quality sensors attached to bicycles ridden by Montreal residents. While the routes occasionally overlap, there are times where cyclists must choose between an expedient journey or a roundabout ride for the sake of reducing pollutant deposits in the lungs. Maria Hatzopoulou, the creator of Clean Map Rider, claims that these detours are rarely longer than one kilometer (0.6 miles). Assistant professor of civil engineering at McGill University, Hatzopoulou created the online tool for cyclists in Toronto and Montreal as a project for the Transportation and Air Quality Research Group. “On certain days, some of Montreal’s most popular cycling paths, such as the one along the Lachine Canal, are also the most polluted because of wind patterns and proximity to highways,” a news release from the university stated. Considering its on-the-go user base, an obvious shortcoming of the fledgling tool is that there is no smartphone app, and users must click around—with repeated zooming in and out—to approximate their origin and destination rather than inputting an exact address. However, the map’s finer points are in the social pressure it exerts on cyclists to contemplate the smog they inhale every day. Clean Ride Mapper’s news release further cautions that traffic intersections fraught with idling cars also tend to be epicenters of pollution in cities. A similar project led by Columbia University in partnership with New York’s local NPR station, is being executed in New York City, whereby dozens of cyclists will be recruited to don air-quality sensors to accumulate data on bikers’ exposure to air pollution.
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Munching on air pollutants: Would you eat these meringues made from the smog you breathe every day?
How do you coax city slickers to really take notice of air pollution? Start selling meringues, of course. At this year's Ideas City festival in New York City, the Center for Genomic Gastronomy set up a "Smog Tasting" food cart introducing aeroir (a play on terroir for the atmospheric taste of place) meringues infused with recreated urban smog from four cities. Riffing off the fact that egg foam is composed of 90 percent air, the Center’s experiment stemmed from the question of whether batter, which captures air when whipped, could also trap air pollutants. “Smog Tasting grew out of this idea of using food as a biosensor...Perhaps this could be a way of calling attention to the problem,” Zackary Denfield, cofounder at the Center for Genomic Gastronomy, told Fast Company. The meringues were made in small smog chambers the team had designed and fabricated under the advisement of researchers at the University of California Riverside, which trapped grime and chemicals in the egg-white-and-sugar mixture. The four less-than-tantalizing recipes included the “classic London peasouper,” a sampling of the Los Angeles atmosphere circa 1950, air from a present-day air-quality warning event in Atlanta, and California’s Central Valley agricultural smog, the latter a carcinogenic cocktail of ammonia and amines from feedlot manure lagoons and other organic waste. Scientists formed each smog type by mixing different chemical precursors and “baking” them under UV light. The result was a slightly yellowish dessert which imparted a noxious aftertaste initially masked by the sugar. “Most people ask ‘Is it safe to eat?’ and we reply ‘Is it safe to breathe?’” Denfield said. “We think that when people are laughing they are thinking, and we get a lot of nervous laughter.” According to the Center, capturing smog in edible form transforms the “unconscious” process of breathing into the “visceral” act of eating. Inspiring disgust is one way of garnering attention. Conceptualized in 2012 by college students in Bangalore, the project was introduced in May to health ministers and World Health Organization delegates in Geneva. Its showing in New York City by the Center for Genomic Gastronomy in collaboration with the Finnish Cultural Institute of New York was part of the Center’s larger scheme of examining the health implications of where our food is sourced. In a post on their dedicated blog, Edible Geography, the Center wrote that according to scientists the Center had consulted with, the human digestive system is better-equipped to catalyze chemicals than the respiratory system.
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IDEAS CITY Winning Pavilion “MirrorMirror” To Reflect the Bowery On Saturday
The Storefront for Art and Architecture and the New Museum in New York City have announced the winners of the StreetFest Tenting Competition for their upcoming IDEAS CITY Festival, arriving Saturday in front of the New Museum on the Bowery. The international competition asked architects to re-imagine the typical street fair tent with a more compelling and sustainable form. Winner Davidson Rafailidis—lead by Georg Rafailidis and Stephanie Davidson of Buffalo—were chosen for their entry, MirrorMirror, which will premiere at 6:00pm on Saturday May 4th. Like Sir Norman Foster’s recent “Vieux Port” pavilion in Marseilles, MirrorMirror features a reflective ceiling that mirrors street level activity to create a more dynamic urban experience. Meanwhile, the pavilion’s gable roof reflects the surrounding skylines, allowing passersby to engage with nearby architecture without craning their necks. The simple design, constructed from aluminum frames and Mylar mirror foil, suggests the overarching objectives of the IDEAS CITY Festival: raising consciousness about the untapped capital of the urban environment. Last year’s winner, The Worms by New York based Family and PlayLab, will be on view once again. The other submissions for this year’s competition, over 80 in all, can be seen in an online exhibition hosted by the Storefront starting May 1st. The biennial IDEAS CITY Festival will run from May 1-4, featuring conferences and workshops, and culminating in a street festival on Saturday along Bowery, Rivington, Chrystie, and Stanton.