Search results for "Goettsch Partners"

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Goettsch'r Done

Rendering released of the new tallest building in Nashville
Global architecture firm Goettsch Partners has released renderings for what will become Nashville’s tallest building. The Paramount is slated to top out at 750 feet and will consist of 65 stories of luxury residential apartments. The 12,000-square-foot plot where the tower will rise is located on Church Street, where the Church Street Park currently stands, adjacent to the city’s RAMSA-designed Greek Revival central library. Giarratana is the developer. The tower is projected to be rather slender: the 10,500-square-foot footprint leaves an extra 1,500 for a plaza and exterior lobby areas. A glass-bottomed cantilevered swimming pool will be supported by two grand exposed steel girders and will hang over much of the lower level. If the building is realized as-is, it will stand nearly 250 feet higher than Nashville's 505 building, also a luxury residential tower, and safely surpass the city's AT&T Building—colloquially known as the 'Bat Building'—whose spires top out at 617 feet. The Paramount reveal comes at a time of rapid growth for Goettsch Partners. Recently, the firm has been tapped to design projects in San Francisco, Chicago, Abu Dhabi, and Bogota, Colombia. The CR Cultural Center, and a super-tall skyscraper, both located in Nanning, China, are currently in the final stages of construction. Outside of the Nashville proposal, the firm is also expanding its presence throughout the U.S., proposing numerous mixed-use and multifamily developments, as well as large-scale and office and hospitality projects. The date for the Paramount's ground-breaking has yet to be announced.
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Flying High

Top design firms are vying for Chicago O'Hare expansion project
Twelve firms are in the running to design a massive expansion to Chicago O’Hare International Airport. Last week, teams from Santiago Calatrava, SOM, Bjarke Ingels Group, and more submitted their qualifications ahead of the city’s Thursday deadline to secure a bid, according to The Chicago Tribune. The $8.7-billion addition, known at O’Hare 21, will replace Terminal 2 with a global terminal and concourse that will cater to domestic and international flights from United and American Airlines. Two additional satellite concourses will be built out during construction as well. The top two firms chosen after an extensive review process by the Department of Aviation will be awarded design contracts for the new global terminal and satellite concourses respectively. O’Hare 21 is the airport’s first major architectural undertaking in 25 years and will expand its total terminal area from 5.5 million to 8.9 million square feet. The chance to design a gateway project for an airport of this size is a huge win for any firm. Many of the studios that submitted proposals already have both large-scale and small-scale airport projects on their resume: Calatrava (Bilbao), Fentress Architects (Denver), Studio Fuksas (Shenzhen), and SOM (Mumbai, Singapore). O’Hare’s own Terminal 1 was designed in 1986 by Jahn, which has also entered the race. Other high-wattage firms are forming joint ventures with local architects to win the competition. Foster + Partners is working with JGMA and Epstein, while Rafael Viñoly Architects is teaming up with Goettsch Partners. Studio Gang has an even larger team under its belt that includes STL Architects and Solomon Cordwell Buenz. Global firms HOK and Gensler are also in the mix, running on their own. According to the Tribune, securing the architects to design the O’Hare expansion is a critical job Mayor Rahm Emanuel hopes to have done before leaving office in May. The city expects to finish the multi-phase project by 2026.
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This Ain't Your Parent's CAF

The new Chicago Architecture Center offers informative, tangible experiences
Chicago’s long-salient architecture non-profit, the Chicago Architecture Center, formerly the Chicago Architecture Foundation, has swapped out its old digs at the Railway Exchange Building for a high-visibility space just steps from the south end of Michigan Avenue. With the fresh location in Ludwig Mies van der Rohe’s 111 East Wacker Drive, the Center's new home sits just ashore of where the world-famous architecture boat tour has launched since 1983. Designed by Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture with exhibit designer Gallagher & Associates, the Center's spaces are designed to expand and contract with current and future exhibits, but also across Chicago’s long and continued dialogue with architecture and design. The Chicago Gallery is located inside a cavernous interior space, with a newly expanded model of the city, which has grown from 1,300 to 4,500 3-D-printed resin buildings and now includes subtle topographic features and neighborhoods as far south as Cermak Road and as far west as Sangamon Street. Interactive touch screens are positioned around the model, where visitors can search for buildings by architect or style, view data about changing land use, or explore the “10 Buildings You Should Know” feature. A film playing at intervals behind the model provides a dramatic narrative of the city's built history and is heavy on neighborhood content. This emphasis on everyday architecture continues across the rest of the Chicago Gallery, where Chicago’s vernacular architecture gets some significant airtime along with familiar names like Wright, Sullivan, and Burnham. Exhibitions continue upstairs, where the Skyscraper Gallery riffs on the Chicago invention and studies its international forms. The Building Tall exhibit features 23 skyscraper models at the scale of 1:91, including a composition of five models of buildings all of which were, at one time, the tallest in the world. These models are offset by a 40-foot-tall wall of glass where one can get up close and personal with some of Chicago’s most iconic and notorious buildings, including the Wrigley Building, Trump Tower, and the new flagship Apple store across the river. New exhibits at the Chicago Architecture Center draw from contemporary issues and reflect the profession's desire to draw in a wider audience. All are heavy on technology, but here there is a marked absence of Instagrammability, even in the supersized models of the Skyscraper Gallery. Whether intentional or not, this emphasis on physical experience over social media photo ops feels freshly genuine in contrast to made-for-Instagram museums. Exhibits are readable and tangible, but are also adaptable and future-forward, with enough variety in content to appeal both to visitors who know everything about architecture and those who know nothing at all. There is an emphasis on current and future projects, with not only Adrian Smith + Gordan Gill, but with other architects influencing the shape of Chicago to come, including Studio Gang and Goettsch Partners, as well as Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, whose design for 400 North Lake Shore Drive on the former Chicago Spire site when completed in 2023 will do more to change the skyline of Chicago than any other structure in fifty years.
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Broke Bridge

Chicago offers up historic Chicago Avenue bridge for free
Looking for a gift that truly shows you care? Give the gift of infrastructure! The Chicago Department of Transportation (CDOT) has announced it is offering up one of its historic bascule bridges for free to any state, local or responsible entity willing to haul it away. Built in 1914 by the Ketler-Elliot Erection Company of Chicago, the Chicago Avenue Bridge spans the north branch of the river and is one of many pony truss style bascule bridges. The bridges’ leaves are suspended on axles underneath the street, with the counterweight hidden within a riverbank pit tucked behind a limestone enclosure. This type of bridge was developed in Chicago in 1900, with the first one constructed in 1902 still in operation at Cortland Street and the Chicago River. Bascule bridges opened easily and did not obstruct the river with a central pier, a must to accommodate a busy early 20th century waterway serving Chicago’s commercial route to the Mississippi River system. The bridge replacement is a component to proposed traffic improvements along Chicago Avenue in advance of the construction of One Chicago Square, a massive 869 residential structure proposed at State Street and Chicago Avenue. Designed by Goettsch Partners and Hartshorne Plunkard Architecture, One Chicago Square calls for two glassy towers atop a podium, the tallest of which tops out at 1,011 feet, making it what could be Chicago’s sixth tallest building. The future owner of the bridge assumes all costs for moving the bridge and maintaining historically significant features. The City of Chicago intends to replace the bridge with a modern concrete and steel structure this fall. Those interested must submit a proposal by July 13.  Thus far, the CDOT has received no offers for the bridge. The bridge comes with a determination of eligibility for the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP), which requires the City of Chicago to make a reasonable effort to offer the bridge up for restoration to interested parties. The gift includes the embedded counterweights and the two bridge houses.
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CLT Superstore

2017 Best of Design Awards for Office & Retail
2017 Best of Design Award for Office & Retail: Albina Yard Architect: LEVER Architecture Location: Portland, Oregon

Albina Yard is the first building in the United States made from domestically fabricated cross-laminated timber (CLT). This new 16,000-square-foot speculative office building utilizes mass timber construction, with a glue-laminated timber frame and CLT panels manufactured and prefabricated in Riddle, Oregon. The project’s primary goal was to utilize domestic CLT in a market-rate office building that would pave the way for broader adoption of renewable mass timber construction technologies in Oregon and the United States. The design approach reflects a commitment to this sustainable technology by developing an architecture focused on economy and simplicity, material expression, and the careful resolution and integration of all building systems to foreground the beauty of the exposed Douglas fir structural frame.

“As a structural strategy, mass timber is very similar to a cast-in-place concrete structure in terms of layout and function of its individual elements. The main difference is the character and humaneness of the remaining spaces.  It is very well-suited for this type of use.” —Nathaniel Stanton, principal, Craft Engineer Studio (juror) General Contractor: Reworks Structural Engineer: KPFF Consulting Engineers CLT Supplier: DR Johnson Lumber CNC Routing: Cut My Timber   Honorable Mention Project: Cummins Indy Distribution Headquarters Architect: Deborah Berke Partners Location: Indianapolis, Indiana This new office building reinforces an active pedestrian experience that is connected to downtown Indianapolis and its parkland. The unusually slender floorplan and high ceilings provide abundant natural daylight for every space and minimize reliance on electricity. A high-performance “calibrated” facade and an integrated system of fins and shades limit heat gain and increase thermal comfort.   Honorable Mention Project: Zurich North America Headquarters Architect: Goettsch Partners Location: Schaumburg, Illinois Located on a 40-acre expressway site in suburban Chicago, the North American headquarters of the Swiss Zurich Insurance Group reflects the company’s global reach and commitment to sustainability. Composed of three primary “bars” that are offset and stacked, the arrangement creates unique spaces for collaboration, opens views of the surrounding landscape, optimizes solar orientation for amenities, and provides programmatic flexibility.
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42 Categories

Here are the winners of the 2017 AN Best of Design Awards
The 2017 AN Best of Design Awards was our most successful yet. After expanding the categories to a whopping 42, we got over 800 submissions that made the judging more difficult than ever. Projects in all shapes and sizes came from firms big and small from every corner of the country. While we were surprised by the quantity of submissions, we were not surprised by the quality of the work put forth by our trusty base of architects and designers. There were some telling trends, however. First, the Adaptive Reuse category could have been three times as big as it was, because almost every category received some kind of reuse project. From lofts to retail spaces in disused buildings, the amount of old structures made new is astounding and speaks to larger movements in U.S. architecture. Reclaimed spaces are currently stylish and it is generally better for the environment and local culture when we reintegrate existing structures into their cities. One surprise was that our Northeast Building of the Year, the MASS MoCA renovation by Bruner/Cott Architects, took home the prize. The massive reuse project skillfully renegotiates an old factory, which the jury found to be more successful and important than some other new buildings that might have won in the past. Similarly, for Midwest Building of the Year, we saw a tie between two powerhouse campus projects. Studio Gang’s University of Chicago Campus North Residential Commons and WEISS/MANFREDI’s Kent State Center for Architecture and Environmental Design ignited a strong debate among the jury, and in the end they both proved worthy of the award. It is refreshing to see such good architecture being realized in the Midwest, and it says something about the state of architecture nationwide. Our jury this year was a blast as always, with a very talented group that sparked vigorous discussions and refined the way we look at architecture. It is always good to get more people involved in the conversation, and we are constantly shifting our views on what is relevant and interesting. We hope you enjoy this selection of winners and honorable mentions, and we look forward to hearing from you next year as we keep searching out the best architecture and design to award! William Menking, editor in chief Matt Shaw, senior editor We will be updating this list over the next few days with winner and honorable mention profiles. To see the complete feature, don't miss our 2017 Best of Design Awards issue, out now! 2017 AN Best of Design Awards Building of the Year Midwest Winners (tie) University of Chicago Campus North Residential Commons Studio Gang Chicago Kent State Center For Architecture and Environmental Design WEISS/MANFREDI Architecture/Landscape/Urbanism Kent, Ohio Building of the Year West Winner Point Loma Nazarene University Science Complex Carrier Johnson + CULTURE San Diego, California Building of the Year Northeast Winner The Robert W. Wilson Building at MASS MoCA Bruner/Cott Architects North Adams, Massachusetts Building of the Year Mid-Atlantic Winner Lewis Center for the Arts at Princeton University Steven Holl Architects Princeton, New Jersey Building of the Year Southwest Winner Arizona State University Beus Center for Law and Society Ennead Architects Phoenix Building of the Year Southeast Winner Grove at Grand Bay Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) Coconut Grove, Florida Restoration Winner The Benacerraf House Michael Graves Architecture & Design Princeton, New Jersey Honorable Mentions ROW DTLA Produce Renovation Rios Clementi Hale Studios Los Angeles Aurora St. Charles Senior Housing Weese Langley Weese Architects Aurora, Illinois Adaptive Reuse Winner The Contemporary Austin Jones Center Lewis.Tsurumaki.Lewis Architects Austin, Texas Honorable Mentions New Lab at the Brooklyn Navy Yard Marvel Architects Brooklyn, New York MASS MoCA, The Robert W. Wilson Building Bruner/Cott Architects North Adams, Massachusetts Building Renovation Winner Black House Oza / Sabbeth Architecture Sagaponack, New York Honorable Mentions Billboard Building SHULMAN + ASSOCIATES Miami The Beckoning Path BarlisWedlick Architects Armonk, New York Lighting – Outdoor Winner Longwood Gardens Renovation L’Observatoire International Kennett Square, Pennsylvania Honorable Mentions University of Iowa, Hancher Auditorium Cline Bettridge Bernstein Lighting Design Iowa City, Iowa City Point Mall Focus Lighting Brooklyn, New York Lighting – Indoor Winner Second Avenue Subway Domingo Gonzalez Associates New York Honorable Mention Body Factory BFDO Architects New York Civic – Administrative Winner Boston Emergency Medical Services The Galante Architecture Studio Boston Honorable Mentions United States Courthouse, Los Angeles Skidmore, Owings & Merrill Los Angeles San Diego Central Courthouse Skidmore, Owings & Merrill San Diego Civic – Cultural Winner Jan Shrem and Maria Manetti Shrem Museum of Art SO-IL with Bohlin Cywinski Jackson Davis, California Honorable Mention Chrysalis MARC FORNES / THEVERYMANY Columbia, Maryland Civic – Educational Winner Elmhurst Community Library Marpillero Pollak Architects Queens, New York Honorable Mentions Lakeview Pantry Wheeler Kearns Architects Chicago University of California, San Diego Jacobs Medical Center CannonDesign La Jolla, California Hospitality Winner Broken Rice Undisclosable Denver Honorable Mention Wilshire Grand Tower Complex AC Martin Los Angeles Office & Retail Winner Albina Yard LEVER Architecture Portland, Oregon Honorable Mentions Cummins Indy Distribution Headquarters Deborah Berke Partners Indianapolis Zurich North America Headquarters Goettsch Partners Schaumburg, Illinois Facade Winner United States Courthouse - Los Angeles Skidmore, Owings & Merrill Los Angeles Honorable Mention University of South Florida, St. Petersburg, Kate Tiedemann College of Business ikon .5 architects, Harvard Jolly Architects St. Petersburg, Florida Green – Residential Winner Casa Querétaro DesignBridge Chicago Honorable Mention Inhabit Solar Cabana Inhabit Solar Queens, New York Green – Civic Winner Princeton University Embodied Computation Lab The Living Princeton, New Jersey Honorable Mention United States Courthouse, Los Angeles Skidmore, Owings & Merrill Los Angeles Infrastructure Winner 10th and Wyandotte Parking Garage BNIM Kansas City, Missouri Interior – Residential Winner Chilmark House Schiller Projects with Lisa Gray of GrayDesign Chilmark, Massachusetts Honorable Mention Capsule Loft Joel Sanders Architect New York Interior – Retail Winner Health Yoga Life BOS|UA Cambridge, Massachusetts Interior – Workplace Winner Memphis Teacher Residency archimania Memphis, Tennessee Honorable Mention RDC-S111 Urban Office Retail Design Collaborative Long Beach, California Landscape – Private Winner LaGrange Landscape Murray Legge Architecture La Grange, Texas Honorable Mention De Maria Garden Gluckman Tang Architects Bridgehampton, New York Landscape – Public Winner Confetti Urbanism Endemic (Clark Thenhaus) San Francisco Honorable Mentions Farnham-Connolly State Park Pavilion Touloukian Touloukian (Pavilion Architect) with Crosby Schlessinger Smallridge (Landscape Architect) Canton, Massachusetts The Meriden Green Milone & MacBroom Meriden, Connecticut Mixed Use Winner North Main Bates Masi + Architects East Hampton, New York Honorable Mention Brickell City Centre Arquitectonica Miami Residential – Multi Unit Winner True North EC3 Detroit Honorable Mentions American Copper Buildings SHoP Architects New York 2510 Temple Tighe Architecture Los Angeles Residential – Single Unit Winner Michigan Lake House Desai Chia Architecture with Environment Architects Leelanau County, Michigan Honorable Mentions Constant Springs Residence Alterstudio Architecture Austin, Texas Upstate Teahouse Tsao & McKown Pound Ridge, New York Urban Design Winner India Basin Skidmore, Owings & Merrill San Francisco Honorable Mentions Atlanta’s Park Over GA400 Rogers Partners and Nelson Byrd Woltz Landscape Architects Atlanta The Reconstruction of Astor Place and Cooper Square WXY New York Small Spaces Winner Five Fields Play Structure Matter Design + FR|SCH Projects Lexington, Massachusetts Honorable Mention Attic Transformer Michael K Chen Architecture New York Unbuilt – Commercial/Civic Winner The Ronald O. Perelman Center at The World Trade Center REX New York Honorable Mention Lima Art Museum (MALI) Young Projects Lima, Peru Unbuilt – Infrastructure Winner The Regional Unified Network ReThink Studio New York Honorable Mention Rogers Partners Galveston Bay, Texas Unbuilt – Landscape Winner Maker Park STUDIO V Architecture Brooklyn, New York Honorable Mentions The Statue of Liberty Museum FXFOWLE Liberty Island, New York Pier 55 Mathews Nielsen Landscape Architects New York Unbuilt – Residential Winner 14 White Street DXA studio with NAVA New York Honorable Mentions Long Island City Oyster Carlos Arnaiz Architects (CAZA) New York Necklace Residence REX Long Island, New York Young Architects Winner mcdowellespinosa architects Charlottesville, Virginia and Brooklyn, New York Honorable Mentions Spiegel Aihara Workshop San Francisco Hana Ishikawa Chicago Temporary Installation Winner Living Picture T+E+A+M Lake Forest, Illinois Honorable Mentions Big Will and Friends Architecture Office Syracuse, New York and Eindhoven, the Netherlands Parallax Gap FreelandBuck Washington, D.C. Representation – Analog Winner Cosmic Metropolis Van Dusen Architects Conceptual Honorable Mention Trash Peaks DESIGN EARTH 2017 Seoul Biennale of Architecture and Urbanism Architectural Representations – Digital Winner Three Projects SPORTS New York Honorable Mentions MIDDLE EARTH: DIORAMAS FOR THE PLANET NEMESTUDIO Conceptual New Cadavre Exquis NEMESTUDIO Conceptual Digital Fabrication Winner Under Magnitude MARC FORNES / THEVERYMANY Orlando, Florida Honorable Mentions Flotsam & Jetsam SHoP Architects Miami As We Are Matthew Mohr Studios Columbus, Ohio New Materials Winner Indiana Hardwood Cross-Laminated Timber IKD Columbus, Indiana Research Winner Snapping Facade Jin Young Song (University at Buffalo, Dioinno Architecture) Conceptual Honorable Mention The Framework Project LEVER Architecture with the Framework Project Portland, Oregon Student Work Winner Preston Outdoor Education Station el dorado inc Kansas State University, College of Architecture, Planning, and Design Elmdale, Kansas Honorable Mentions Waldo Duplex el dorado inc Kansas State University, College of Architecture, Planning, and Design Kansas City, Missouri Big Vic and the Blue Furret Rajah Bose California College of the Arts San Francisco, California A special thanks to our 2017 AN Best of Design Awards Jury! Morris Adjmi Principal, Morris Adjmi Architects Emily Bauer Landscape Architect, Bjarke Ingels Group Eric Bunge Principal, nARCHITECTS Matt Shaw, Senior Editor, The Architect’s Newspaper Nathaniel Stanton Principal, Craft Engineer Studio Irene Sunwoo Director of Exhibitions, GSAPP
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Nifty Fifty

Fifty firms imagine 50 futures for Chicago's underused spaces
Running in conjunction with the Chicago Architecture Biennial, the Chicago Architecture Foundation (CAF) has opened Between States, a show which brings together over 50 designers to imagine the future of the city’s 50 aldermanic wards. Between States is the second iteration of the CAF’s multi-year 50 Designers/50 Wards project. Last year’s show 50 Designers, 50 Ideas, 50 Wards asked 50 young design firms to design for the city’s wards, while Between States asked a number of more established firms to take on a similar challenge. Each of the firms was asked to address underutilized spaces in each one of their respective wards, as well as reference another project outside of the city in their design. The title of the show, Between States, is a play on this two-part brief, referring to the changing condition of the sites as well as the importing of references from other places. Firms were also asked to work with the community to assess needs and opportunities in the neighborhood they were designing in. The show will run until January 7, 2018 in the CAF’s Atrium Gallery. The exhibition is curated by Martin Felsen, partner at Chicago-based UrbanLab. Invited firms include: Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture AECOM ARUP Bailey Edward bKL Architecture Booth Hansen CannonDesign Cordogan, Clark & Associates Dirk Denison Architects eastlake studio Eckenhoff Saunders Architects Epstein Exp Farr Associates Forum Studio Future Firm Gensler Ghafari Associates Goettsch Partners Hartshorne Plunkard Architecture HBRA Architects HDR Holabird & Root JAHN Legat Architects Lothan Van Hook Destefano Architecture Metter|Studio / Morris Architects, Planners Sheehan Nagle Hartray Architects Pappageorge Haymes Partners Perkins + Will Global RADA Architects Searl Lamaster Howe Architects Site Design Group SmithGroup JJR SMNG A Solomon Cordwell Buenz SOM Space Architects + Planners Stantec STL Architects Terry Guen Design Associates Thornton Tomasetti Tom Brock Architect Valerio Dewalt Train Associates Vinci Hamp Architects Vladimir Radutny Architects von Weise Associates Weese Langley Weese Wight & Company, Lohan Studio Woodhouse Tinucci Architects Worn Jerabek Wiltse Architects
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great halls

Chicago Union Station renovation will brighten its Great Hall
In a city of spectacular interior spaces, perhaps the most iconic is the Great Hall of the Chicago Union Station. Built in 1925, the light-filled waiting area is finally getting the renovation it deserves. Construction is now underway on the $22 million project that will completely refurbish the 219-foot-long skylight and repair plaster throughout. Union Station was originally designed by Daniel Burnham, but was completed by Graham, Anderson, Probst & White after Burnham’s death. The Beaux-Arts structure now serves both Amtrak and the regional commuter Metra trains. Over the past 90 years, the great hall has slowly degraded due to leaks in the epic skylight, but recent years have seen the beginning of its revitalization. In 2016, the iconic marble stairs made famous in the climatic shootout scene in The Untouchables were completely renovated. Both the stair renovation and the current overhaul of the Great Hall are led by Chicago-based Goettsch Partners. When the staircase was being worked on, the area was closed off, much to the chagrin of tourists who came to see the site of the famous scene. To maintain movement through the Great Hall for this renovation, all the construction will be done without closing the space. Instead, decks will be suspended from the 115-foot-tall ceiling, negating the need for obtrusive scaffolding. To address the skylight’s water problems, each of the 2,052 pieces of glass will be replaced and a new third layer of glass will be added above the entire opening. The new high-efficiency, fully transparent glass panes will replace the current wire-embedded glass, and the end result is expected to allow about 50 percent more light into the space. Once the significant water damage on the walls is repaired, the entire Great Hall will be repainted in its original color. This phase of Union Station’s renovation is being funded by Amtrak, who owns the building, and is expected to be completed in late 2018. By that time, we may also have more information about Goettsch Partners' ambitious plans to redevelop the station and its surroundings, including the proposal to add two towers to the building’s roof.
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Travel Plans

New towers will rise atop Chicago Union Station as part of redevelopment

The redevelopment of the Chicago Union Station has been a long time coming. The 1925 Beaux Arts station has seen minor repairs in the past few years, but a recently released master plan envisions a complete redevelopment of the historic building and the surrounding area.

Led by Riverside Investment & Development Co., the Goettsch Partners–designed master plan will take the form of 3.1 million square feet of new commercial, retail, and residential space. Divided into three phases, work will begin in the historic headhouse and continue to neighboring properties, owned by Amtrak, above the below-grade railroad tracks. When complete, five new towers will rise above and around the station.

“This building was envisioned by Daniel Burnham in the 1909 Plan for Chicago as the city’s primary rail station,” said Amtrak President and CEO Charles W. “Wick” Moorman IV to the press at the announcement of the master plan. “It is in that spirit, that we have big plans for both this headhouse building and nearby properties owned by Amtrak.”

The headhouse, originally designed by Burnham and completed by Graham, Anderson, Probst & White after his death, is considered a Beaux Arts masterpiece. With its 110-foot-tall skylit great hall, the headhouse has often been used as the backdrop of films, most notably in the climax of the 1987 movie The Untouchables. The new master plan calls for a dramatic addition to the headhouse: Initial designs call for two 12-story residential towers to be added to the top of the building. The existing top portion, which is currently office space, will also be redeveloped. While adding towers to the top of the historic structure may seem drastic, it should be noted that the original design called for a commercial skyscraper to sit atop the building. This technique of matching civic spaces with office high-rises was once popular in Chicago, most famously in the cases of the Auditorium Theatre and the Lyric Opera House.

The rest of the development will follow another once-common building practice associated with Union Station. Immediately to the south of the headhouse, three new towers will take advantage of air rights over a set of 14 tracks that run into the station. The Chicago Daily News building and the Chicago Main Post Office, two of Chicago’s most recognizable art deco icons, were built in the same way, straddling the tracks to the north and south of the station.

Along with the towers, the master plan calls for improvements to the passenger experience as well. Despite serving over 50,000 guests a day, the station, which is mostly underground, is outdated and generally unpleasant. Street-level retail, historic restoration, and a new food hall will all be addressed in the redevelopment. A hotel has been proposed for above the headhouse, and publicly accessible terraces and plazas are also included in the master plan.

Considering Chicago Union Station is the only major train station in Chicago, and the third busiest in the country, its surroundings have seen surprisingly little development over the years. The most recent addition to the area is a $40 million bus transit center designed by Chicago-based Muller+Muller. Ironically, that station will have to be demolished and rebuilt to be integrated into the proposed master plan. But, since no hard dates have been set to implement the new plan as it negotiates the financial side of the project, the transit station is safe for now.

While every major development in Chicago brings with it scores of critics and champions, this one has the potential to spark particularly lively discussions. If the architecture of the project at all resembles the renderings of the master plan, many Chicagoans will have something to say about putting two glass towers on top of their much-loved Beaux Arts landmark.

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MBA All-Star

Northwestern University builds a new curving, glassy home for its business school

Dubbed the Global Hub, Northwestern University’s latest addition to its Evanston campus is a grand new home to the Kellogg School of Management. The recently opened five-story building sits immediately along the shore of Lake Michigan on land reclaimed by the university decades ago. Defined by four large wings, which produce a plan that resembles the letter K, the curving form of the building makes no small reference to the waves on the water it overlooks.

“The first inspiration was the action of the water and the waves, and how they round off materials and forms to make them smooth,” explained Bruce Kuwabara, partner at Toronto-based firm KPMB, which designed the new building. “It was beautiful, the power of Lake Michigan and nature.”

The project is composed of a series of vastly different-sized spaces, accumulating to a whopping 415,000 square feet. The building is the new home to full-time business students, faculty, and administration offices. Collaboration areas throughout can accommodate from two to twenty individuals, and larger gathering spaces can handle from 200 to 2,000.

The largest space in the complex is the massive multistory center atrium, where all four wings connect. The structure’s exterior curves continue into this space in the form of flowing balconies and staircases. Two of the large wooden staircases at the heart of the building double as seating for formal and informal events. Another atrium on the upper levels acts a second major space. Both allow for copious amounts of natural light.

The building’s high-tech envelope not only allows in all of that light, but also contributes to the project’s goal of achieving LEED Gold certification. Throughout, double and triple glazing provide daylight and energy efficiency, while automated shading controls glare and solar gain. A series of undulating fritted glass fins adds an additional layer of shading. On the interior, borrowed light is distributed through glassed office partitions. Perhaps even more than daylighting and energy efficiency, the glass facade provides something the building takes ample advantage of: unmatched views of the lake and the downtown, 15 miles to the south.

Called the “Global Hub,” it is part of the University’s larger building program that includes the 2015 Goettsch Partners–designed Patrick G. and Shirley W. Ryan Center for the Musical Arts. Both new additions to the campus run counter to its existing catalogue of Brutalist and gothic-revival structures.

The stark contrast between old and new on Northwestern’s campus is the school’s physical manifestation of its vision for the future of education. And Northwestern is not alone—dark wood–lined halls and oak tree–filled quads are being replaced by brighter, more transparent and generous collaboration spaces at many traditional campuses. It is only a matter of time before the image of the elite campus is less about spires and more about sunlight.

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Light Emitting Lobby

Chicago tower gets 150-foot-long LED art installation
A new art installation has recently been illuminated in the epic lobby of the Goettsch-designed 150 North Riverside. At 150 feet long and 22 feet high, 150 Media Stream is an ever changing digital installation comprised of 89 LED blades. Commissioned by the building's developer, Riverside Investment & Development, the installation was closely integrated with 150 North Riverside's design. “150 Media Stream represents an interesting convergence of art, architecture, and technology, and we believe it celebrates the transformational experience of media art,” said Yuge Zhou, creative director at Riverside Investment & Development. The physical components of 150 Media Stream were designed and constructed by McCann Systems, who worked with Digital Kitchen. Chicago-based Leviathan produced the initial artwork and content delivery system. “We set out to build a flexible, intelligent system of endless digital content that would make 150 Media Stream look exceptional, every moment of every day,” explained Jason White, executive creative director of Leviathan. The artwork that will be displayed on the installation will be commissioned from artists and students. A series of collaborative projects have been specifically created for the piece in classes sponsored by Riverside. Partnering cultural and educational institutions also contributed. The first prominent artist to be featured on the installation will be Chicago-based new media artist Jason Salavon. Coupled with its site specificity, this will be one of the largest pieces Salavon has ever done. “The opportunity to explore these aspects of this project was intriguing. There is no other video wall in the world that looks like this one,” Salavon said.
The 150 Riverside tower will officially open Thursday, April 20, 2017, with the lobby being open to the public starting Friday, April 21, 2017, at 6pm.
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110 North Wacker Drive

Goettsch Partners unveils new 51-story tower for Downtown Chicago
Chicago-based Goettsch Partners has released an extensive set of renderings for 110 North Wacker Drive, a new office tower proposed for a site just across the river from the firm's nearly finished 150 North Riverside Tower. The 51-story 110 North Wacker Drive will rise along the east bank of the south branch of Chicago River, adding 1.35-million-square-foot to Chicago’s financial district. Clad in a sheer aluminum and glass curtain wall, the tower will include one of Goettsch Partners’s signature bases. The tall glassy ground floor is set back from the street and the river, not unlike 150 North Riverside. A serrated facade along the building’s western side will provide views up and down the river for its tenants, while rooftop decks will provide a 360-degree panorama of the surrounding city. Along with class-A office space, the tower will include retail dining, a conference center, and a fitness facility. “One of the few office building sites in downtown Chicago bounded by three streets and the Chicago River, 110 North Wacker Drive is the last premier office site in Chicago offering unmatched views of and from the building,” said James Goettsch, FAIA, chairman and CEO of Goettsch Partners in a press statement. “The site’s trapezoidal shape allows us to provide a series of stepped projections on the western facade, enhancing views up and down the river, emphasizing the building’s verticality, and providing the building with a distinct identity. At street level, almost half of the site is publicly accessible and features a soaring covered riverwalk, supported by a distinctive structural design.” To achieve its size, the project paid $19.55 million into the city’s Neighborhood Opportunity Bonus system. This money, which allows developers increase FAR or building height, is then used for community improvements around the city. A full 80% of the nearly $20 million will go towards commercial corridor improvements in under-served neighborhoods, while the remaining 20% going towards landmarks around the city and infrastructure in the neighborhood around the tower.