Search results for "Facades+ AM"

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Beautiful Brut

DIGSAU brings prefabricated concrete formwork to the Philadelphia Navy Yard
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The Philadelphia Navy Yard, similar to other waterfront areas across the country, is undergoing a two-decades-long transformation from a declining industrial district to a burgeoning office park. A significant number of businesses have located to the adaptively reused warehouses, while others are opting for entirely new construction. 351 Rouse Street, which is the U.S Headquarters of medical research laboratory Adaptimmune, is a recent addition to the area designed by architectural firm DIGSAU and clad in prefabricated concrete panels. DIGSAU, who are located a few miles north of the Philadelphia Navy Yard, are not unfamiliar with the site, having completed a similarly prefabricated concrete office building just down Rouse Street in 2015.
  • Facade Manufacturer Universal Concrete Centria YKK JE Berkowitz
  • Architect DIGSAU
  • Facade Installer Turner Construction EDA Hutts Glass Co.
  • Facade Consultant RDWI
  • Structural Engineer ENV
  • Location Philadelphia, PA
  • Date of Completion 2018
  • System Custom assembly
  • Products YKK YCW 750XT & 750SSG JE Berkowitz AG50 (Clear) Centria Silversmith Aluminum
Irregular sites require thoughtful and straightforward design and structural solutions; the project is located adjacent to an electrical substation, underground utility lines, and a nearby lot slated for future development. In response to this setting, DIGSAU developed a low-slung and, at certain moments, cantilevered massing for the nearly 50,000-square-foot structure. The overall character of the massing is extenuated by the horizontal impressions of the wood formwork. The light-gray surface is semi-reminiscent of a striated archeological section; the extruded and recessed finish alternates between rough and smooth grain and is broken up by ribbons of fenestration. The economy of the facade impression was significantly influenced by the budgetary and timeline constraints of the project, and the total tab for the project was an impressively tight $10 million. "The precast spandrel panels and ribbon windows are market-driven development approaches that have proven to be highly effective for controlling costs and speeding up construction timelines," said DIGSAU principal Mark Sanderson. "We were intrigued about how we might both embrace and deny these techniques simultaneously: the repetitive precast patterning is interrupted with vertical joints that increase in density where the ribbon windows are agitated." Installation of the panels had to be fairly straightforward to meet the tight timetable of the project. To this end, weld plates were cast into each facade unit which were then subsequently hoisted into place and welded to the steel frame. Once in place, the panels simultaneously function as both external cladding as well as support for the high climate-controlled YKK framing of the ribbon window. DIGSAU Associate Elizabeth Kahley will be joining the panel “Medium-sized and Mixed-use Projects: Opportunities for Creative Mix of Materials and Scale" at The Architect's Newspaper's upcoming Facades+ Philadelphia conference on October 18.
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Windy City Enclosure

Edward Peck discusses enclosure technology and Facades+ Chicago
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On September 27, The Architect's Newspaper is returning to the Great Lakes for the sixth time to host Facades+ Chicago. The city is no stranger to architectural innovation, pioneering steel-frame construction, and the curtain walled skyscraper. The conference is, in effect, an appraisal of the most recent projects and research that keep Chicago ahead of the curve in architectural design and technology. Participants for the conference symposium and workshops are leading practitioners based in Chicago and the Midwest, including Brininstool + Lynch, the Chicago Department of Buildings, Gensler, Heitman Architects, Krueck + Sexton Architects, the Passive House Institute US, Sentech Architectural Systems, Sterling Bay, Thornton Tomasetti, and WJE. Edward Peck, managing director of Edward Peck Design and a facade expert with decades of experience, collaborated with AN as co-chair of the conference to curate the program and will also present on the panel "Ongoing Advancements in Glass Technology: From Smart Coatings to Connection Design," which will  be expanded upon as an afternoon workshop. In this interview with AN, Peck discusses the themes and objectives of the upcoming conference. AN: Research and Innovation are at the forefront of this year’s conference in Chicago. What lessons do you hope will be garnered by the audience? Edward Peck: Correct. At this conference, we want to draw the connection between the two. To innovate, one needs to invest time and effort into Research (R&D). We are a profession where every project is a prototype yet we find ourselves with less and less time for the integration of Research and Advanced Analytics but to build meaningful architecture that is inspirational, sustainable and resilient we will need to find better ways to perform and collaborate on Research and new Innovations to meet the environmental challenges of today and tomorrow. AN: How are firms in Chicago impacting design across the country and perhaps globally? EP: Architects in Chicago have a rich history for impacting architecture and urban conditions globally. We have a collective body of progressive work around the world-leading innovations in sustainability, performance and structural force pushing towers to new heights. With this comes a body of innovative engineers that are our primary collaborators on these projects enriching the entire practice of architecture and enabling Chicago to maintain our position as a critical thought leader in progressive architecture. AN: What do you perceive to be the most interesting design trends within Chicago today? EP: I try to stay away from trends. One needs to focus on the building’s performance; both its impact on the environment and the user while understanding its urban or contextual integration. If these conditions are your focus your work will transcend trends. I believe the Trumpf Smart Factory, a featured project at this conference does that; it is focused on its program while also exhibiting the values and capabilities of Trumpf as a company. AN: Facade materials are undergoing a significant evolution due to advanced research. Are there any specific materials we should be paying attention to? EP: I think smart or dynamic building skins and systems are worth paying attention to – There are a lot of products that are now moving into their second generation making them more attractive and feasible in the market. Buildings must perform in a wide range of conditions, systems that can adapt or transition within this range will undoubtedly be integrated into future designs. Further information regarding Facades+ Chicago can be found here.
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Face Lift

The Met updates its facade with Wangechi Mutu sculptures
The niches on the facade of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, empty for the institution's 117-year history, are now filled with artwork. On Monday, the museum unveiled the four bronze sculptures by Nairobi-born and Brooklyn-based artist Wangechi Mutu for the building's exterior fronting Fifth Avenue. The work, collectively titled The NewOnes, will free Us, is the first of The Met’s annual commissions intended to not only enliven the structure’s historic Beaux Arts exterior but to affirm the museum's commitment to showcasing a more contemporary and diverse repertoire. The sculptures represent four seated or kneeling figures with reflective golden disks (configured as a coiffure in one instance) bearing down on a head or covering a mouth and eyes in others. These disks show both a weighty burden, as well as a display of status and nobility inspired by the traditional dress of African women. Mutu's sculptures reference the canonical figure of the caryatid, a prevalent theme in both classical and African art. Whereas the caryatid has traditionally been a sculpted female form acting as structural support or embellishment, Mutu has brought her own mediation on the trope. Instead, her sculptures carry their own weight and emanate autonomy and regality. The facade commission presents an opportunity for the historic art institution to grapple with its place in the contemporary art world and shift away from its Eurocentric past. “What I am most grateful to Wangechi Mutu for is how this grand, temporary installation enables the Museum to continue our momentum on the important path of rethinking what an encyclopedic museum can and should provide, and how it can engage with the important notion of contemporaneity in a meaningful way,” said Max Hollein, the Met's director, in a statement about the inaugural commission. Mutu's sculptures will be on-view on Fifth Avenue until January 12, 2020.
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Go big, with large format tile
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For years, the demand for tile was focused on smaller formats. Manufacturing processes meant larger tiles were cumbersome and difficult to work with. Thanks to advancements in ceramic tile technology, trends are shifting. Manufacturers are creating products that have doubled and tripled in size, resulting in architecture and design opportunities with limitless possibilities. “The large format tile movement has taken off,” says Rocamador Rubio Gomez, director for Tile of Spain. “Artisans are replicating natural finishes such as concrete, marble and stone and creating masterpieces out of ceramic tile that are aesthetically appealing and functional.” Below highlights a few leading trends for large format tile: Outdoor Living Spaces Gone are the days of maintaining wood decks and patios. Wide plank wood tile brings the warmth and style of genuine wood to your outdoor space without the upkeep. Building Facades Large concrete and stone look tiles are taking the place of stucco, wood, and glass exteriors. Ceramic tile offers durability, aesthetic quality, and easy maintenance. Spa Inspired Bathrooms Natural stone-look tiles have become a popular choice for bathrooms. The minimalist effect of large tiles creates a relaxed ambiance and spa-like atmosphere. To learn more about Spanish ceramic tile trends, visit: www.tileofspainusa.com.
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North of the Border

Facades+ Toronto will dive into the trends of North America's fastest growing construction market
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On October 11, The Architect's Newspaper is bringing Facades+ to Toronto for the first time to discuss the architectural trends and technology reshaping the city and region. Toronto's KPMB Architects, an architectural practice with a global reach, is co-chairing the conference. Panels for the morning symposium will discuss KPMB Architects' decades-long collaboration with Transsolar Klima Engineering, the proliferation of timber construction across Canada and specifically its university campuses, and the adaptive reuse of Ontario's architectural heritage. The second portion of the conference, which occurs in the afternoon, will extend the dialogue with intensive workshops. Participants for the conference symposium and workshops include the Canada Green Building Council, the Carpenters' District Council of Ontario, the College of Carpenters, Diamond Schmitt Architects, ERA Architects, Kirkor Architects & Planners, Maffeis Engineering, Moses Structural Engineers, MJMA, NADAAA, RDH, and UL. In this interview with The Architect's Newspaper, KPMB's Director of Innovation Geoffrey Turnbull and Senior Associate David Constable, the conference co-chairs, discuss the theme of the symposium's first panel, "Dynamic Skins: A Conversation on Innovative Facades," an exploration of KPMB and Transsolar's use of double-glass facades. AN: KPMB & Transsolar’s collaboration began over a decade ago with the Manitoba Hydro Palace. Can you expand on the significance of the project, and how lessons learned from the collaboration were applied to future projects David Constable & Geoffrey Turnbull: Manitoba Hydro represented a turning point for KPMB in how the office approached sustainability, but more fundamentally, forced a re-think of the typical design process. This project demonstrated how building design and function may converge to become something greater than a sum of its parts. One of the first projects in North America to invest in a true IDP, or ‘Integrated Design Process’, the design team undertook a process with the client to bring all disciplines to the table at the very beginning of the project. Decisions were discussed and evaluated in detail with input from all disciplines, and the form and strategy for the project grew organically from that process. The first step in the integrated process was the development of a Project Charter, which became the guiding code against which all decisions were measured and validated. AN: How does the use of software inform Transsolar’s consulting during the design process? DC & GT: Transsolar has a high degree of in-house technical expertise in the physical sciences, as well as a deep well of experience on built projects. These capabilities, paired with advanced modeling tools, gives Transsolar a unique ability to develop strategies for projects from a first-principles perspective. As architects, this is transformative in terms of the possibilities that can arise from a collaboration with Transsolar. Where we would otherwise be limited to rules-of-thumb and best practices, working with Transsolar allows us to interrogate the particulars of a given project and derive solutions that are unique to that specific project. Manitoba Hydro Place is an excellent example of this… It’s not immediately obvious that, in a cold climate like Winnipeg, a glass office tower would make sense. By understanding the site, identifying what is unique about it (e.g. there is a very high degree of sunshine in Winnipeg for such a cold city), and then building a strategy around that, we were able to design a project that provides an exceptional degree of comfort for the occupants, a lot of natural daylight, and terrific views to the landscape, all while being one of the most energy-efficient buildings on the continent in a city with a seasonal temperature swing of 65 degrees. In addition, Transsolar uses Transys modeling software, which allows for robust, iterative testing of concepts at a small scale, allowing the team to quickly test assumptions and prove out specific relationships between building components. This process allows active components such as motorized operable windows and automated louver blind systems to be tested in a dynamic way. Elements such as wind, sun, and humidity can all be modeled and reviewed dynamically over the course of an entire year. AN: All of the projects to be discussed during "Dynamic Skins" possess double-glass facades. Can you elaborate on this feature and its merits? DC & GT: Ultimately, on any project where a double facade represents an optimal solution, this will be driven primarily by the desire to optimize the interior environment for occupants. These systems allow us to accomplish a host of optimizations that enhance comfort in the space: maximize daylighting while modulating glare, provide natural ventilation for a larger percentage of the year, minimize radiant asymmetries so that it’s comfortable to sit near the window in winter and summer, etc. Fundamentally the difference between a traditional facade and a double facade is this concept of static versus dynamic. Traditional facades are forced to implement one static condition throughout the entire course of the year. In a Canadian environment, this can represent a huge swing in conditions – temperature, radiance, wind, and humidity can all change radically and quickly. A double facade allows the building skin to become an active component in the life of a building. Windows and shading devices become active elements which remain in constant dialogue with both the interior and exterior environment and allow the building to adapt in real-time to its environment. Further information regarding Facades+ Toronto can be found here.
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Let in the light

Krueck + Sexton and Thornton Tomasetti bring undulating glass to Chicago's Mercantile Exchange
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Chicago's Krueck + Sexton Architects, a practice founded in 1979, has established a particular niche in the design and implementation of complex glass facades. Their projects present a significant range in terms of location and scale, ranging from the multiplanar Spertus Institute on Michigan Boulevard to a slew of private residences and the restoration of Mies van der Rohe's prestigious structures dotted throughout Chicagoland. Recently, the firm wrapped up a full revamp of the Chicago Mercantile Exchange's lobby with an undulating structural glass wall. Located on Lake Michigan, Chicago has served as country's primary inland entrepot for over a century—the Chicago Mercantile Exchange (CME) was founded in 1898. The CME migrated to its current headquarters in 1987, a heavy granite-clad postmodern tower located immediately adjacent to the Chicago River. The design objective of the project was to establish an inviting and prominent facade for a structure in which over 10,000 people cross through daily, replacing 18 separate dark and weighty entrances.
  • Facade Manufacturer Roschmann Group Porcelanosa
  • Architect Krueck + Sexton Architects
  • Facade Installer Roschmann Group
  • Facade Engineer  Thornton Tomasetti
  • Location Chicago
  • Date of Completion 2019
  • System Custom structural glass system
  • Products Custom Roschmann IGU panels KRION Porcelanosa
The glass streetwall runs the entire width of the city block, weaving behind the square columns that form an encircling arcade. When developing the overall contour of the glass facade, Krueck + Sexton Architects analyzed the movement of surrounding pedestrians and inputted that information to follow the preexisting desire lines of foot traffic. Roschmann Group, the Germany-based manufacturer, handled the fabrication of the bespoke system. Each panel measures approximately 25-feet-by-four-feet and were installed using a custom-designed suction cup lifting device. "The glass is base loaded, and the glass fins provide support for lateral loads such as wind and inside and outside differential," said Krueck + Sexton Associate Principal Yugene Cha. "The top of the glass fin is held by a clever suspension system that can slide up and down and sideways allowing the building to move without breaking the glass." The street-level prominence of the facade, as well as the remarkable visibility of the oversized glass panels, required the implementation of direct and simple detailing where pane meets the ceiling, ground floor, and glass fin. The most challenging aspect of almost any project is the unforeseen conditions onsite after the commencement of construction. For the CME, frequent shifts in the grade below the street level required recalibrations of waterproofing details as well as glazing base plate design. It was critical to the success of the project to loop in the facade engineer, Thornton Tomasetti, from the point of conception. "First, Krueck + Sexton and Thornton Tomasetti worked together to develop a highly-detailed and complete facade package in the Schematic Design Phase, setting the project up for a successful Bidding Phase and Design Assist collaboration," said Thornton Tomasetti Senior Project Director Mark Chiu. "Second, Thornton Tomasetti pre-engineered the facade system’s glass sizes and thicknesses shown in the Schematic Design documents, validating the minimalist design details." Behind the structural glass facade, Krueck + Sexton placed a sophisticated system of 2,644 white synthetic-mineral panels that rise and curve to form the ceiling and continue outward to roof the arcade. The material is non-porous, allowing for straightforward maintenance. Krueck + Sexton Architects Founding Principal Mark P. Sexton and Thorton Tomasetti Senior Project Director Mark Chiu will be joining the panel "Ongoing Advancements in Glass Technology: From Smart Coatings to Connection Design" at the Architect's Newspaper's upcoming Facades+ Chicago conference on September 12. In the afternoon, the panel will be extended into an intensive three-hour workshop.
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REACH for the Stars

Steven Holl expands the Kennedy Center with semi-submerged pavilions
Steven Holl Architects (SHA) has designed and completed the first-ever expansion of the John F. Kennedy Center for Performing Arts. Located southeast of the National Mall along the Potomac River, the three pavilions that make up The REACH opened this weekend to the public, marking the Washington, D.C.-based institution’s largest design upgrade in its 48-year-history. The $250-million addition spans four-acres of sweeping, waterfront landscape next to the main Edward Durell Stone-designed building that’s held all of the Kennedy Center’s programming for decades. Arranged in a series of angular, cast-in-place concrete structures that are semi-submerged underground, The REACH is strategically woven into the surrounding, sloping green space and features a contemporary vision that lightly references its parent building next door According to a press release, the new structures “break down the traditional barriers separating art and audience.” The Welcome Pavilion, Skylight Pavilion, and River Pavilion all emerge from the green lawns with shapely white facades and opaque glass windows. Together, they make up a porous and fluid, 72,000-square-foot facility that, though largely underground, includes ample access to daylight and features soaring, open interiors.  While the site doesn’t look very active from an aerial perspective, what you see above ground isn’t all that you get. Inside and below the pavilions is a large network of flexible rehearsal studios and classrooms, as well as performance and public spaces that are, by design, more welcoming to visitors—something the Kennedy Center previously lacked. AN wrote previously about the crinkled concrete walls that were integrated into the studio spaces to stop sound from echoing throughout the below-grade rooms. Performance-enhancing technology such as this was used at every level of the building project. For example, SHA worked with ARUP to make The REACH more sustainable than its predecessor; it’s now on track to achieve LEED Gold status. The site features a closed-loop, ground source heat rejection system, advanced temperature controls, an under-floor concrete trench system, and radiant floor heating made by ARUP’s in-house software suite, Oasys Building Environmental Analysis (BEANS). Much like other projects by Steven Holl, the integration of unique light cutouts on the sides or tops of the buildings and curvaceous walls made the structures difficult to heat or cool efficiently. Arup’s interventions will help the facility maintain proper temperatures year-round.  In addition to improving the Kennedy Center campus, The REACH was intended to bolster the memory of JFK. Some of the spaces within the pavilions were named after the 35th president, and a plaza with 35 gingko trees honors his life and accomplishments. Over time, the 130,000-square-foot landscape is expected to grow into a fuller, more vibrant addition to the riverfront and help activate a formerly-inaccessible area. SHA also designed a pedestrian bridge to cross the highway separating the Center from the water’s edge. 
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A No-Spoiler Zone

Once Upon a Time in Hollywood ingeniously blends existing and fabricated scenery
Los Angeles may be popularly thought of as a city with relatively little regard for the history of its built environment in favor of a ceaseless self-transformation, yet countless examples of the buildings completed during the movie industry’s Golden Era of the 1940s, ’50s, and ’60s, as well as a few fortunate survivors from before that era, remain intact to this day. The production team behind Quentin Tarantino’s latest film, Once Upon a Time in Hollywood, set in 1969, made ample use of what was available while developing innovative techniques for what was not. Following the friendship of actor Rick Dalton (Leonardo DiCaprio) and stuntman Cliff Booth (Brad Pitt) as they narrowly come into contact with the sordid details of the Manson Family murders, Once Upon a Time takes its viewers through grand, unobstructed views of the city as it appeared half a century ago. A period piece with this much exposure, of course, required a detail-oriented crew to revert the city to its former glory without the extensive aid of digital set extensions. Barbara Ling, the lead production designer of Once Upon a Time, claims to have placed over 170 sets and facades in between preexisting structures to convincingly frame the film in the late 1960s. Lengthy stretches of Hollywood Boulevard, for example, were shut down for production to allow for long sweeping shots of the street as high up as a bird’s eye view. During the street closures, the elements completed off-site were brought in with cranes and quickly set into place. During several close-up shots, the posters and other period-accurate materials in the background were borrowed from Tarantino’s own collection of vintage memorabilia (including the same advertisement for Tanya suntan lotion advertisement famously displayed on the cover of Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown’s book Learning from Las Vegas from 1972). But the film also takes advantage of what the city would never dare destroy. Once Upon a Time begins with Rick, Cliff and Marvin Schwarz (Al Pacino) inside Musso and Frank Grill, the “Oldest in Hollywood,” which is celebrating its centennial this year. Because its interior has been virtually unchanged since it first opened on Hollywood Boulevard, it is only in the transition from interior to the exterior that movie magic is employed, in which the production team skillfully recreated the restaurant’s original parking lot entrance based on old photographs. According to Variety, the restaurant staff even pulled out the original plateware from their storage room. The same creative mixture of reality and fabrication is most brilliantly applied near the end of the film, in which a gorgeous series of sunset shots seamlessly combines the city’s existing neon signage, such as that for the 1963 Cinerama Dome, with those that have been lost to time. But perhaps the greatest challenge met by Once Upon a Time is persuading its audience that Los Angeles is a beautiful city. “Los Angeles may be the most photographed city in the world,” Thom Anderson argued in his 2003 documentary Los Angeles Plays Itself, “but it’s one of the least photogenic. It’s not Paris or New York. In New York, everything is sharp and in-focus, as if seen through a wide-angle lens. In smoggy cities like Los Angeles, everything dissolves into the distance, and even stuff that’s close-up seems far off.” While Tarantino’s three previous movies set in the city—Reservoir Dogs (1992), Pulp Fiction (1994), and Jackie Brown (1997)—succumbed to the global stereotypes by depicting it as a gritty hellscape befitting the crime and corruption taking place under his direction, Once Upon a Time portrays Los Angeles with an unapologetic charm rivaled only by Roman Polanski’s Chinatown (1974) and Rebel Without a Cause (1955). Attention to detail and historical accuracy will likely make Once Upon a Time an essential reference for film and architecture buffs alike. As Tarantino contemplates his next and possibly last film (which will, no doubt, be another period piece), one can only hope that his focus on the built environment will somehow be even sharper.
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If It Looks Like Marble...

5G Studio Collaborative brings trapezoidal sintered stone to Dallas
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Downtown Dallas is undergoing a remarkable process of development, ranging from new office towers to prestigious cultural facilities. 5G Studio Collaborative, an architecture and design firm founded in 2005, has consistently expanded its body of work within its home city over the last decade-and-a-half. Completed in 2018, the AC Marriott Hotel Dallas is another addition to that ensemble, bringing a Catalan Modernisme-inspired sintered stone facade to the city center. The massing of the nearly 170,000-square-foot project is defined primarily by the northern elevation's slightly curved rectangular volume. Sintered stone and glass are the main facade elements for the elevation, and approximately 400 custom panels were used in total. The panels themselves are angular and protrude outward from the primary structure, giving the facade further depth while passively shading the window modules.
  • Facade Manufacturer Neolith Alucobond Trulite Vitro Cardinal Glass
  • Architect 5G Studio Collaborative
  • Facade Installer Holland Marble NOW Specialties
  • Structural Engineer DCI Engineers
  • Location Dallas, Texas
  • Date of Completion 2018
  • System Neolith StrongFix system
  • Products Neolith Calacatta Alucobond FR Vitro Solarban 60 Cardinal Low-E 366 & 270
According to the design team, the initial material choice for the project was white marble—a light-colored facade is a useful tool for reflecting the sun's rays in a hot state like Texas. However, it was soon learned that the delicate composition of marble would not fare well in Dallas's emission-cloaked environment, or under the significant temperature variances of north Texas. While sintered stone proved to be a more durable material than marble for the purposes of the project, the weight and complexity of the panels brought its own challenges to the project. The project team struggled with the rain screen system and its application to the sloped soffits of the exterior. The solution was to use an internal truss system located behind each individual panel. Additionally, the edges and intersections of each panel were custom-measured onsite following the actual evaluation of site conditions. The slabs were produced by Neolith and assembled by Holland Marble, a local fabricator and installer. Utilizing Neolith's StrongFix system, the design and fabrication teams were able to maintain a continual dialogue to adjust the anchoring components and assembling services to conform to the largely unique panels. "The design journey was an enjoyable one as we were able to maintain the initial concept right from the beginning until completion," said 5G Studio collaborative associate Lauren Cadieux. "We are very happy with the end result: a seemingly 'floating' facade that transitions effortlessly across the front, west, and east sides of the exterior."      
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Hancock Brethren

Pei Cobb Freed's One Dalton joins the Boston skyline with curved glass curtainwall
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Rising from a triangular lot in Boston’s Back Bay, One Dalton is a 61-story, 706,000-square-foot residential tower designed by Pei Cobb Freed & Partners. Its gently curving triangular floorplan—a direct product of the unique site—is extruded vertically to create the building’s clean but dynamic glass form. The slightly bulging facades and the sheer size of the glass units presented some major challenges when it came to developing the cladding. The glass panels are some of the largest the firm had ever worked with, with a typical unit spanning 12-feet-tall by almost 6-feet-wide with a 30-degree curve. The firm set ambitious goals for the glass beyond the unusual size and shape with specific targets for deflection and distortion, solar and thermal transmission, color rendering, transparency, UV filtration, glare and reflectance, and noise suppression.
  • Facade Manufacturer Guardian Glass Oldcastle Building Envelope Sobotec Kenneth Castellucci & Associates
  • Architect Pei Cobb Freed & Partners CambridgeSeven (Collaborating Architect)
  • Facade Installer Metro Glass & Metal Cheviot Corporation Kenneth Castellucci & Associates
  • Location Boston, MA
  • Date of Completion 2019
  • System Custom glass and aluminum curtain wal
  • Products Guardian SunGuard SN 70/41
To find the perfect glass, the architects tested many different assemblies using full- scale mock-ups. They ultimately decided on a hybrid design that incorporated laminated, tinted glass with a mild, Low-E coated solar control product (Guardian SunGuard SN 70/41), a low-iron substrate, and argon-filled airspace. Testing also showed that the curving glass produced funhouse mirror-like reflections at night, so an interior anti-reflective coating was added as well. Much like the individual panes of glass, the overall facade is more complicated than it at first appears. Subtle incisions break up the massing of the upper 40 floors, creating protected spaces for operable casements while formally suggesting large bay windows that distinguish the condominium units from the hotel rooms below. “I’m a great believer that, especially in a city, it’s important to bring out the different uses that are taking place [in a tower],” Henry Cobb told the audience in June at AN’s Facades+ conference in Boston. One Dalton wouldn’t be possible without the rapid evolution of architectural glass driven by ambitious designs and new technologies. Commenting on these changes, Roy Barris, associate partner at Pei Cobb Freed, noted that despite the firm’s exhaustive pursuit of the perfect material, “If we were to start this project again today, we’d have to start from scratch.”
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Don't Wait Too Late

There's only one month left to enter Archpaper's 2019 Best of Design Awards
Don't wait until it's too late to enter the 2019 AN Best of Design Awards. There's only one month left until the October 4 deadline, so begin (or complete) your submissions today! With 50 comprehensive categories to choose from, there are more chances to win than ever before. This a great opportunity to make sure your latest completed, unbuilt, speculative, and research-based projects receive the recognition they deserve. Our esteemed jury, comprised of New Affiliates Co-Founder Jaffer Kolb; Selldorf Architects partner Sara Lopergolo; Skidmore, Owings & Merrill associate director Carlos Madrid III; The Architectural League of New York program director Anne Rieselbach; The Architect’s Newspaper executive editor Matt Shaw; and Oana Stănescu Studio founder Oana Stănescu, will select the best Canadian, Mexican, and US building, interior, installation, representation, renovation, public, urban, and student projects. Winners, Honorable Mentions, and Editor's Picks in all 50 categories will be announced in the special end-of-year Best of Design magazine, in dedicated articles on Archpaper.com and ANInteriormag.com, and extensively on our social media platforms. Winners will also receive a signed limited edition poster by famous radical architecture collective Archigram. Categories
  • Adaptive Reuse
  • Restoration & Preservation
  • Building Renovation — Single-Unit
  • Building Renovation — Multi-Unit
  • Building Renovation — Commercial
  • Building Renovation — Civic
  • Architectural Lighting — Indoor
  • Architectural Lighting — Outdoor
  • Architectural Representation — Analog
  • Architectural Representation — Digital
  • Cultural
  • Public
  • Education
  • Healthcare
  • Commercial — Hospitality
  • Commercial — Office
  • Commercial — Retail + Mixed Use
  • Digital Fabrication
  • Facades
  • Green Building
  • Infrastructure
  • Interior — Institutional
  • Interior — Healthcare
  • Interior — Hospitality
  • Interior — Residential
  • Interior — Retail
  • Interior — Workplace
  • Landscape — Residential
  • Landscape — Public
  • New Materials
  • Research
  • Residential — Multi-Unit
  • Residential — Single-Unit
  • Small Spaces
  • Temporary Installation
  • Exhibition Design
  • Unbuilt — Commercial
  • Unbuilt — Cultural
  • Unbuilt — Education
  • Unbuilt — Public
  • Unbuilt — Residential
  • Unbuilt — Urban Design
  • Unbuilt — Green
  • Unbuilt — Landscape
  • Unbuilt — Interior
  • Urban Design
  • Young Architects Award
  • Student Work — Individual
  • Student Work — Group
  • Student Work — Representation
Eligibility  In order for a project to be eligible for submission, it must have been completed within one year’s time of the submission deadline (October 2018). Landscape, Public, Unbuilt, and Representation projects must have been completed within two years time of the submission deadline (October 2017). The Best Of Design Awards are open to Canadian, Mexican, U.S. and international firms (e.g., architects/ designers/ consultants/ engineers/ manufacturers), but projects submitted must be located within Canada, Mexico, or The United States.
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Best of Products Awards

Meet the winners of our 2019 Best of Products Awards

After hours of carefully deliberating over five hundred entries from our largest ever Best of Products Awards, we are excited to share the Winners, Honorable Mentions, and Editors’ Picks. These eighteen diverse categories cover a wide range of sectors, including building materials, acoustics, furnishings, finishes, tech products and tools, kitchens, baths, and more. Our judges evaluated submissions for originality, innovation, functionality, aesthetics, performance, and value, and selected one winner and two honorable mentions in each category. New this year, our editors also picked their favorite products in all 18 categories.

All images are courtesy of their respective manufacturers unless otherwise noted. The Best of Products Awards Jury: Lora Appleton Founder kinder MODERN & Female Design Council Constantin Boym Founder Boym Partners Gabrielle Golenda Products Editor The Architect’s Newspaper Alda Ly Principal and Founder Alda Ly Architecture & Design William Menking Editor in Chief The Architect’s Newspaper Fiona Raby Cofounder Dunne & Raby Categories:

Indoor Finishes and Surfaces

Winner ExCinere Dzek “It’s fascinating how this product brings the outside in, and then back outside again. It evokes an actual landscape in a way that’s subtle but special; a great talking point for your clients.” —Lora Appleton Honorable Mentions Matte Collection Callidus Guild iD Mixonomi Tarkett North America Editors' Picks Magna Recycled Glass Slab Walker Zanger Soft Onyx Fiandre Indoor Lighting and Electrical Winner Noctambule FLOS “The scale of this product is grand for a modular component. It’s monumental enough to look great in a large-scale palatial setting but can also be scaled down to an urban residential context.” —Lora Appleton Honorable Mentions Dorval Lambert & Fils RAY Sconce Stickbulb Editors’ Picks Plena Foscarini Haller E USM Fascio Medium Linear Chandelier with Crystal Visual Comfort & Co. Residential Interior Furnishings Winner Stille Standard Issue “The product is interesting because the manufacturer was able to produce something that is familiar but still new. It shows that shapes don’t always have to be reinvented. It represents a sort of aesthetic recycling.” —Constantin Boym Honorable Mentions Portal Armoire Henrybuilt Beanie Sofa Nea Studio Editors’ Picks 5M Chair soft limits Hull Collection O&G Studio Hillock Console Skylar Morgan Furniture   Commercial Interior Furnishings Winner Meredith Lounge Chair Poppin “If I saw a bunch of these chairs in an airport, I’d be very happy.” —Matt Shaw, The Architect’s Newspaper’s executive editor Honorable Mentions Divy Mobile 3form Racer Collection Blu Dot Editors’ Picks Swing Pair Landing Wilkhahn Acoustics Winner Trypta Luceplan “With more and more open ceilings in commercial offices, there hasn’t been a lot of innovation in how we deal with noise. This product is a good example of lighting that integrates acoustics panels.”—Alda Ly Honorable Mentions Kula Glass Unika Vaev Blade Luxxbox Editors’ Picks Open Spaces 2.0 CertainTeed Ceilings VaporSoft® Arktura Home Accessories Winner Alaire Collection Atlas Homewares Honorable Mentions Side Table Fink Furniture Vestalia LATOxLATO Editors’ Picks Smooth Operator Kit Garden Glory Soffio Foscarini Textiles Winner VEER Wolf-Gordon “There’s a subtlety to the combination of textures in this product that makes it strong. There’s something beautiful about the transition between its 2- and 3-dimensionality.”—Fiona Raby Honorable Mentions Scaramouche Dedar Tatami System Tarkett North America Editors’ Picks Gradation Shaw Contract The Bauhaus Project Designtex Baths Winner SONAR Wave Double Basin Laufen “The riveting around the edges creates a nice, soft touch.”—Gabrielle Golenda Honorable Mentions Petra Agape Elan Grid Shower Door VIGO Editors’ Picks SideKick Shower System Peerless Faucet SteamVection Steamhead ThermaSol Kitchens Winner Heritage Induction Pro Ranges Dacor “There’s a stereotype that induction cooktops aren’t powerful, but it’s nice to see this technology as an industrial-level product.”—Alda Ly Honorable Mention Space Theory Space Theory Emerald Finish True Residential Editors’ Picks Gunmetal Kitchen Amuneal Professional 7 Series Range Viking Range Touchless Kitchen Faucet Kohler Outdoor Lighting and Electrical Winner LP Xperi Louis Poulsen “This product has both uplight and downlight functions, so it goes beyond the typical scope of a streetlight and considers more ephemeral types of illumination.”—Gabrielle Golenda Honorable Mentions Pursuit Architectural Area Lighting Uma Mini Pablo Designs Editors’ Picks KFL Collection KIM Lighting CIRC Estiluz USA Outdoor Furnishings Winner F100 Flycycle “Often the problem with bike racks is that they are beautifully designed but aren’t very functional. It’s nice to see something so successful at meeting both criteria.” —Constantin Boym Honorable Mentions Paseo Planters OSSO Concrete Design Rambler Picnic Table Shift Editors’ Picks Circula Collection Blu Dot Stack mmcité1 Outdoor Finishes and Surfaces Winner Bison 30-inch-by-30-inch Ipe Wood Deck Tile Bison Innovative Products “Unlike other decking products available today, these plank squares snap into a sliding system, which makes installation easier and allows you to make different configurations.”—Gabrielle Golenda Honorable Mention Dekton Grip+ Cosentino Gradients Móz Designs Editors’ Picks Ombré Cement Tile Villa Lagoon Tile Variegated Zebra Honed “Limestone” Pure + FreeForm Openings Winner Attack Resistant Openings ASSA ABLOY Opening Solutions “This product is necessary given the current state of affairs. Innovation in safety is essential, and it’s really great to see companies using ingenuity to deal with this systemic issue. It’s a Band-Aid solution to an unfortunate problem in the United States.”—Lora Appleton Honorable Mentions The Mitica Collection Boffi Group - ADL Bird1st Glass Guardian Glass Editors’ Picks Lift and Slide WinDoor Steel Entry Pivot Doors MAIDEN Steel Facades Winner InVert Self-Shading Windows TBM Designs “This product reinforces weather conditions and makes you more aware of what’s outside. Rather than everything being completely controlled by humans, natural systems control the building, which is something we need to be dealing with more and more.”—Fiona Raby Honorable Mentions Living Wall Facades Eco Brooklyn Modified Wood Cladding Kebony Editors’ Picks Concrete Skin Breeze Rieder North America Perforated Building Facade Rigidized Metals Isopure Sedak Building Materials Winner Mass Plywood Panel Freres Lumber Co. “To see that there’s advancement in the acceptance of these new, innovative, wood materials is promising.”—Alda Ly Honorable Mentions Foamglas Owens Corning DELTA-DRY & LATH Dörken Systems Editors’ Picks Louvre Railing System Amuneal LP WeatherLogic Air & Water Barrier LP Building Solutions HVAC Winner EcoBlue WeatherMaster Rooftop Units Carrier “This product is simpler, more dependable, and lower maintenance than comparable options on the market today. Too often, design is perceived as something that has to be seen, but this is an invisible product that has a strong impact regardless.”—Constantin Boym Honorable Mentions EME3625DFLMD Ruskin XP Series Industrial HVLS Ceiling Fan Hunter Industrial Editors’ Picks MLZ One-Way Ceiling Cassette Mitsubishi Electric Trane HVAC US i6 Big Ass Fans Tech: Smart Products Winner Life Anew NEXT TOTO USA & Georgia Pacific Pro “Too often, intelligent design becomes an area for gimmicks, but in this case, there aren’t any. This product is a serious working system.”—Constantin Boym Honorable Mentions Intentek Wireless Charging Surface Formica Phyn Plus Smart Uponor North America Editors' Picks PureWarmth Kohler Storage System with Expandable Battery Pack LG Electronics Integrated Wine Column Signature Kitchen Suite Tech: Design Tools Winner ARCHICAD 23 GRAPHISOFT SE “It’s nice that this product allows architects to use Apple computers. It’s just more flexible.”—Alda Ly Honorable Mentions Layer Layer ColorReader Datacolor Editors' Picks OpenCA and ProIO IngeniousIO Origami XR Origami XR