Search results for "432 Park Avenue"

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432 Park Avenue
432 Park Avenue will be one of the few high-rises in New York in which structure and expression are one and the same.
Courtesy dbox

Topping out at around 1,396 feet, 432 Park Avenue will be the second loftiest building in Manhattan when it is completed late in 2015. It will not hold this title for long. Already there are taller buildings in development, including the 1,550-foot-tall 215 West 57th Street just around the corner. But even once it is surpassed in height, 432 will stand out among the crowd of super-tall residential buildings in New York City by dint of its unconventional and elegant structural system.

Courtesy Taylor Scott Mason
 

In addition to being very tall, 432 is very slim. Its footprint is 94 feet square. This extremely slender height-to-width ratio created several challenges for Rafael Viñoly, whose studio designed the tower with executive architect SLCE and structural engineering firm WSP USA. For one, the wind vortex acting upon such a spindly structure promised to create a very uncomfortable amount of acceleration in the upper reaches of the tower, unless strong measures were taken to brace against it. And then there was the challenge of devising a structure that would not only keep the residents from becoming sea sick and the water from sloshing around in the toilet bowl, but would also provide efficient and flexible floor plates capable of being reconfigured by apartment owners.

   
 

The team began by locating the core in the center of the plan and moving the rest of the structure—all reinforced concrete as is typical of residential construction in New York—to the perimeter, leaving clear span bays of 27 feet. The conventional structural solution for managing lateral forces in this type of construction is to use shear walls, which are wider at the bottom of the building and get narrower up the elevation. This, however, did not suit Viñoly’s goal of providing a maximum of flexibility, since it meant that lower floors would have less access to exterior views than those toward the top. Instead, the team came up with a “basket grid” solution of beams and columns based upon a regular, repeating module that would provide the necessary stiffness and the same permeability across the entire structure.

The dimension for the module that the team came up with is 3-foot-8-inch-wide columns and 3-foot-8-inch-wide spandrel beams, leaving six equal open bays across each face of the building—the basket grid. The depth of the columns ranges from 20 inches at the top of the building to as much as 5 feet 4 inches at the bottom. The floor-to-floor heights are 15 ½ feet with 10-inch-thick slabs, though at the top of the building the slabs are 18 inches thick in order to add more mass to combat acceleration.

 

Resources
MEP Engineer
WSP USA
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IBA Consultants
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Roger & Sons

 

Still more had to be done to relieve the wind vortex acting on the structure. Here Viñoly struck upon a particularly ingenious idea: opening the facade at regular intervals and letting the wind simply pass through. Every 12 floors, two levels of the basket grid modules are left empty. Within these open floors are circular enclosures housing mechanicals that serve the six floors above and the six floors below. Breaking up the mechanicals in this way also meant that the architects could keep the ducting at a minimum, preserving valuable saleable square footage. Two large tuned mass dampers at the top of the tower and outriggers in certain of the mechanical floors further contribute to steadying the building.

At 432 Park Avenue, the structure is the facade. The building was literally designed from the inside out. The basket grid of 14,000 psi white Portland cement, cast around preassembled full-floor cages of #20 rebars with steel formwork, filled in with 10-foot-by-10-foot windows, is left without any fascia. It is as simple and elegant an expression of what makes the building work as one could hope to see in a New York City luxury condominium.

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Open House

Liz Glynn turns a corner of Central Park South into a Gilded Age living room for all
For her Public Art Fund piece in Central Park, artist Liz Glynn has spilled the contents of a super-rich enclave out onto the sidewalk for all to enjoy. Open House's cast concrete furnishings, laid out on a public plaza at the southeast corner of Central Park, reference the interiors of one of Manhattan's most famous Gilded Age mansions. Notably, the now-demolished home of politician William C. Whitney featured a 1,000-person ballroom, the kind of mahogany-and-silk fantasia where Ellen Olenska might have caught Newland Archer's eye. Gracing a corner just eight blocks north of the exhibition, the Stanford White–designed home was a lavish gathering place for New York elite. Turn-of-the-century society mingled in its ballroom, one of the grandest private spaces in the city, luxuriating on real and reproduction 18th-century French furniture. Glynn, who's based in Los Angeles, reproduced 26 of those couches, chairs, footstools and graceful entryways in concrete—a material of the people, she told The Architect's Newspaper, that she chose for its associations with working-class modernist housing, particularly in the work of Le Corbusier. The spacious outdoor interior (what Glynn calls her "ruin") was informed by archival research into the gracious homes of old New York, when (like now) the gap between the haves and have-nots defined the production of space in the city. The work reflects too on the decadence of today's ultra-rich, whose tastes shape the New York skyline into wastebaskets and all-glass everything. By turning the private into public, Glynn questions how social class in the city is performed and displayed. "In putting together this exhibition," said associate curator Daniel S. Palmer, "we asked, 'How can we make something that engages the entirety of the plaza, and make this an embodied architectural space?'" Although it officially opens tomorrow, New Yorkers were already making the most of their new living room. A woman was lounging in one of the armchairs, applying chapstick, while another scooped her pug up onto a couch to chat with a friend. To withstand three seasons' worth of weather but allow for design flexibility, the GFRC concrete was blended with an acrylic polymer that allowed Glynn to imprint patterns into the cushions, while decorative wood details are rendered evocatively in the same material. The furniture retains the elegance of its Whitney predecessors, but at 500 to 900 pounds apiece, they are theft-proof and durable enough for ten thousand butts. Open House is on view through September 24 at Doris C. Freedman Plaza, at the northwest corner of 60th Street and Fifth Avenue.
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Big box retail

Glass cube of retail and offices will sit next to Viñoly-designed supertall 432 Park
New York-based real estate investor Harry Macklowe, behind the Bohlin Cywinski Jackson-designed Fifth Avenue glass cube Apple Store, is working on bringing another cube to Manhattan, this time on Park Avenue. “On Tuesday, Macklowe Properties unveiled renderings for what it calls a ‘Park Avenue Cube’—a low-rise retail building adjacent (and connected) to its luxury condominium tower,” The Real Deal reports. The cube was designed by Rafael Viñoly Architects. “Together, the cube and tower will hold 130,000 square feet of retail and office space.” The cube is sited for 432 Park Avenue—also designed by Rafael Viñoly Architects—and will host two floors of retail space totaling 6,600 square feet and a Zion and Breech-designed marble plaza featuring birches. The cube will connect to the supertall condo tower via a below-ground 30,000 square-foot concourse. 432 Park Avenue, which opened at the end of 2015, is currently the tallest residence in New York City, topping out at 1,396 feet. The property was previously the site of the 1926 Drake Hotel which once accommodated celebrities (Judy Garland, Muhammad Ali, among others) and musicians and bands (Jimi Hendrix, Led Zeppelin, The Who, Frank Sinatra). Macklowe bought the property and hotel in 2006, and demolished the hotel in 2007. 432 Park Avenue will also feature 17,600 square feet of office space above 20,000 square feet of retail.  “There are only two markets, ultraluxury and subsidized housing,” Rafael Viñoly told The New York Times in May 2013, at the start of 432 Park construction. At the time, the first ten floors were finished, with 78 left to go.
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Viñoly’s latest Manhattan skyscraper will only be half the size of his 432 Park tower, but that’s still really tall
Rafael Viñoly's latest Manhattan luxury tower almost seems quaint next to his 1,396-foot-tall, trashcan-inspired 432 Park AvenueNY YIMBY has published renderings of the architect's 281 Fifth Avenue in NoMad, which is only about half the size of his Park Avenue behemoth. To be clear, this does not mean the new tower is short—it weighs in at 705 feet tall—but it does reinforce that 432 Park Avenue is really, really tall. As for its design? On its most basic level,281 Fifth Avenue's limited renderings released so far show a glassy box—a lot like other recent New York City skyscrapers. The tower sets itself apart with a series of horizontal spandrel bands between rows of ribbon windows that increase the amount of glass as it ascends—much like a slinky being pulled up from the ground. According to permits filed with the New York City Department of Buildings, the building contains 141 condominiums and nearly 8,000 square feet of retail on the first and second floor. Demolition is currently underway at the site, and the building is slated to be completed in 2018.
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Was Rafael Viñoly’s 432 Park tower inspired by an architect-designed trashcan?
AN had the unique opportunity to walk around the top floor of the supertall 432 Park Avenue tower, where the full-floor penthouse with a $95 million view of Central Park is nearing completion. A Saudi billionaire, Fawaz Al Hokair, was recently announced as the buyer. Ironically, The Real Deal has reported this week that it was also announced by one of the architects—at a Cornell Center for Real Estate and Finance lecture in December—that the Rafael Viñoly design was inspired by, wait for it, a trashcan. 432-park-trash-can2 It's no ordinary trash can, however. The alleged inspiration is a design by Viennese Secession/ Wiener Werkstätte mastermind Josef Hoffmann. His gridded designs represented a new rational, rigorous way of composing objects in the beginnings of modern industrial design. Today, apparently, they are being copied at a larger scale for entire building. The geometric purity of the tower originally looked to us like it came from Aldo Rossi, but Hoffmann makes more sense, especially given the urban context/political ambiguity of the building. In the lecture, Harry Macklowe, who co-developed the building with the CIM Group, revealed that Renzo Piano was also considered for the tower but didn’t work out. The idea for a tall building with a pure form came from Piano, and Macklowe carried that idea forward through the project. “Renzo Piano had said to me—if you have a pure architectural form like a square and you uphold the integrity of that architectural form you will build a beautiful building,” Macklowe to the Real Deal. “That stayed in my mind, and I had considered Renzo Piano for the architect, but it didn’t work out for several reasons.” While the world's super-elite who will soon call the tower home likely would snub the idea of living like an albeit more sophisticated Oscar the Grouch, they might do well to pick up their own Hoffmann trashcan, available for a cool $225 from the Neue Galerie.
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Take a look at the view from the tippy top of Rafael Viñoly’s 432 Park, the supertall tower that will soon house the world’s billionaires
AN got a rare look at the penthouse of 432 Park, Rafael Viñoly's soon-to-be-tallest residential building in the western hemisphere. After a six-minute ride on the construction lift, expansive, $95 million views open up in a 360 degree panorama from large square windows along all four sides of the full-floor apartment. While the building is still under construction, it has already topped out some 1,396 feet above New York City's sidewalks below. The 85-story tower is expected to be completed early next year, but some of the lower floors will be available for move-in this fall, if you are interested. Deborah Berke is handling the interior architecture in the building. Here are some pictures from the six penthouses at the top of Viñoly’s incredibly tall building on Manhattan’s Billionaires' Row.
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“Walk For The Dead” Urges Pedestrian Improvements in Los Angeles’ Highland Park
While Los Angeles implements plans for new bike lanes and other pedestrian improvements along its streets, there is still plenty of work to do. As part of that struggle, Highland Park residents and local activists this week staged the "Walk For The Dead," along North Figueroa Street, wearing Day of the Dead makeup and costumes as a reminder of the pedestrians and bikers who have been killed by cars on the thoroughfare. The road is often used as an alternate route to the nearby 110 Freeway, with cars traveling at excessive speeds, claimed the protesters. They also noted that while LA has chosen the road to become one of the its "Great Streets," local councilman Gilbert Cedillo has resisted efforts to make Figueroa a "Safe and Complete Street," with bike lanes and other traffic calming  measures. "The community is sick of unsafe streets, and wants to see improvements," said Eric Bruins, Planning and Policy Director for the Los Angeles County Bike Coalition. Bruins said that plans for bike lanes on the street have already been approved by the city's Department of Transportation (as part of the 2011 city bike plan), but that the department is still awaiting Cedillo's sign off. AN's request for comment from councilman Cedillo's office has so far gone unreturned. The Bike Coalition hopes that bike lanes are the first phase of improvements on the street, added Bruins. Future measures, dependent on funding, would include plantings, street furniture, improved crosswalks, and other pedestrian improvements. But for now safety is the chief concern.  "Our children deserve safe streets," said local community leader Monica Alcaraz. "North Figueroa is not a Freeway."
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One Park To Bind Them All
Courtesy James Corner Field Operations and LAND Studio

As many metropolitan areas around the Midwest begin to reap the benefits of a downtown resurgence that has graced cities from Cincinnati to Chicago, Cleveland plans to turn its lackluster Public Square into a 10-acre park in the heart of downtown.

James Corner Field Operations, Cleveland-based LAND Studio, and transportation consulting firm Nelson/Nygaard have designed a plan to close a two-block section of Ontario Street, a major thoroughfare, and leave Superior Avenue open only to buses. The site is currently four squares, segmented by Superior Avenue and Ontario Street. The proposal hopes to unify them thematically and spatially beyond the closure of Ontario Street.

 
Picnic Hill.
 

“Public Square at this point is a means to an end,” said LAND Studio senior project director Nora Romanoff. “It’s just not very pedestrian-friendly at all.”

In the design, tree-lined pathways and grassy hills weave the square together. The programming aims to make it a true civic space. Dedicated spaces, such as “Picnic Hill” and “Speakers Terrace,” complement space for kiosks, cafes, and ice-skating.

Superior Street bisecting the site will be open only to buses.
 

In Cleveland, downtown development has gathered considerable momentum since the 2008 financial collapse. The city’s mall is getting a facelift, and recent developments include a massive new medical mart and convention center, a casino, and downtown residential and hotel developments. In early June, Cuyahoga County and the City of Cleveland announced another $360 million for planned development linking Public Square with the lakefront.

 
Concert hill (left) and the plaza around an existing monument (right).
 

While redevelopment efforts in the 1990s failed to produce the public interest that comes with a true civic renewal, planners today are focused on parks and cultural experiences. The designers of Public Square hope to unite citywide development gains, stitching together a lively downtown with a leafy civic space.

“We’re trying to optimize all of these catalytic projects that are happening around Public Square,” Romanoff said. “If we’re doing our job right, absolutely this is a park that spurs all of these other things that have nothing to do with the park, but at the same time have everything to do with the park.”

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Grand Avenue Gets Another Extension, But May Lose Gehry?
Los Angeles supervisor Gloria Molina has confirmed what we suspected all along. The Grand Avenue committee—chaired by Molina—has granted the Related Companies a third extension on its lease to develop The Grand, a multi-billion dollar, mixed-use development on top of the city's Bunker Hill. The project's Civic Park, designed by Rios Clementi Hale Studios, opened last summer, and the first built project, an apartment by Arquitectonica, broke ground earlier this month. But the rest of the project, including 9 acres encompassing at least 2,100 residential units, a hotel, shopping, and dining, still remains dormant. Related would not commit to its original designer, Frank Gehry, when AN talked with them last year, nor would they confirm his continued involvement in a recent interview with the LA Downtown News. More images of Gehry's perhaps-defunct plan below.
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125 Greenwich

New renderings revealed for Rafael Viñoly’s latest Manhattan cloudbuster
It didn't take long, but Rafael Viñoly has a new Manhattan tower. 125 Greenwich Street isn't as tall as 432 Park Avenue, a sleek supertall that looms over its neighborhood like the first kid in the class to hit puberty. But Viñoly's FiDi skyscraper is still plenty stringy: Rising 88 stories, the 912-foot-tall glass-shrouded tower just south of the World Trade Center will house luxury condos with interiors by March & White, a British firm that built its reputation designing superyachts. Perhaps because Greenwich Street is so close to the Hudson River, or maybe because rich people like fancy boats, the interiors of the 273 units are inspired by the same leisure vessels that gave March & White its start. The building's top three floors are devoted to nice things like a spa, a 50-foot lap pool, and a fitness center, complete with a yoga studio and training room.  And what's a tall land-yacht without a place to entertain? Residents will have access to a private dining room, events space, and screening room.

Dual exposed concrete columns with a zipper of windows run the length of the wasp-waisted tower, creating almost column-less floorplates, while the curved glass curtain walls should offer sweet views on the diagonal. While the renderings show off plenty of height, there are no images of the ground condition, leaving questions unanswered about the building's relationship with the street.

Here's what Viñoly had to say about the design: "125 Greenwich Street takes an unconventional approach to current residential tower design in New York City. The landmark tower's structure is essentially two giant upended I-beams that facilitate a nearly column-free interior for highly flexible residential configurations. A curtain wall system with rounded corners that efficiently mitigate wind pressure—and take full advantage of the panoramic views—completes an elegant structural solution. Two I-beams have never been more productive." Although the tower was announced back in 2014, the new renderings accompanied the building's sales launch today. Prices start at $1.2 million for a studio, with prices for three bedrooms (the largest apartments) starting at a little over $4.6 million.
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432 Park

The highest completed penthouse in New York City is also one of the most beautiful
New York-based designer Kelly Behun has completed a half-floor penthouse at Rafael Vinoly’s 432 Park Avenue. Co-developed by CIM Group and Macklowe Properties, the 3,977-square-foot model penthouse is located on the 92nd floor of the 96-story, 1,396-foot-tall residential building, which is the tallest residential tower in the Western Hemisphere. Priced at $39.75 million, the penthouse sits at 1,224 feet in elevation and faces south with views of nearly every New York City landmark including the Empire State Building, Chrysler Building, Central Park, Statue of Liberty, Brooklyn Bridge, Lower Manhattan skyline, and New York Harbor out to the Atlantic Ocean.

@kellybehunstudio perfection on the 92nd floor

A post shared by Céline Vaaler (@celinevaaler) on

Asymmetrical design pieces respond to the building’s signature 10-foot by 10-foot square windows and iconic white grid. “My goal was to create a timelessly elegant space that feels warm and comfortable. My favorite aspect of the apartment has to be the views through those oversize windows,” said Behun. “To have all of Manhattan unfurl below you in this way is nothing short of extraordinary, and nothing I would do inside could ever upstage that, so I just sought to create a warm embrace from which to enjoy it.” The penthouse has three bedrooms, three bathrooms, a powder room, library, gas and wood-burning fireplace, laundry room, service entrance separate from the elevator landing, and formal entrance gallery.
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Mastering the Metropolis

Two new exhibitions at MCNY dive into the soul of New York
Two new exhibitions at the Museum of the City of New York (MCNY) excavate the past and future of New York with a historian's eye for patterns and an urbanist's love of variety. The permanent exhibition, which tries to present New York's entire 400-year history, adheres to the platonic ideal of the 19th-century museum with forward-thinking updates that open up the urban encyclopedia for perspectives on the city of the future. New York at Its Core occupies three galleries—the whole first floor—divided chronologically and organized around the themes of money, density, diversity, and creativity to reveal the city's essential qualities and explain its changes. Although featured artifacts anchor the historical galleries—Port City, 1609-1898 and World City, 1898-2012—the exhibition, part of MCNY's ten-year, $100 million renovation, is a multimedia bonanza that uses digital representation to both immerse visitors in the past and visualize the Gotham to come. Your correspondent is wall text's #1 fan and one of the world's slowest museum-goers. Via immersive visuals like a colorized floor-to-ceiling projection of Mulberry Street around 1900 and touch-screen "learn more" graphics that highlight New Yorkers famous and obscure, Port City and World City gratify a pendant's desire to learn as much as possible about New York's development, but the cheerfully packed graphics and 400-plus artifacts will provide a quick review for the less patient. The exhibition was designed by New York–based Studio Joseph while Local Projects executed the media and playful UX design. Pentagram was responsible for the graphic design throughout. A spatial thread, Mapping New York, links changes in the city's land use to cultural and political changes through the three galleries. That element gets its biggest expression in the third and thrilling Future City Lab, a suite of interactive virtual-reality installations that open up questions around the challenges of an ever-growing city. Facing the entrance, the digital map overlays almost 100 maps to document the present and peer into the future (up until 2050). "Our philosophy past and present is that New Yorkers' actions shape the city," said Jake Barton, founding principal of Local Projects. Actions on a screen count, too: Visitors are invited to explore the intersectional problems of housing, transportation, outdoor space, living together, and getting by in New York through SimCity-like games that amuse and edify. In the housing section, visitors can construct an apartment building from one of the five boroughs to create a structure based on context, budget impact, and sustainability—the very real factors architects and developers consider when building in the city. Your corresponded saw a visitor create an eight-story Morris Adjmi–esque condo in East Harlem with large units, subtract volume to make a ziggurat, add trees to the terraces, and put a seniors' disco (programming) all along the third floor. Aside from housing, the outdoorsy can redesign a street or create a park. This reporter made a Manhattan waterfront recreation area that scored major points on biodiversity and flood mitigation for its oyster beds and native grasses, but went over-budget with a floating pool, public art, windmills, and a skatepark. A video of the final product (below) is projected onto a wall-sized screen in the museum for all to admire or make fun of: Each of the five themes is complemented by street photography from Joseph Michael Lopez. For metadata nerds who desire transparency, the curators set up the Data Nook, a cozy display that offers insight into how and why the exhibition's statistics were chosen and represented. After the joy of the lab, it would be a mistake to stop exploring. Upstairs, a second and thematically compatible exhibition, Mastering the Metropolis: New York City and Zoning, 1916-2016, delves into the city's zoning code on its centennial. The show injects brio and vitality into the rules—which, in today's iteration, fill three thick binders—that both govern building in New York and shed light on how ideas for the "ideal metropolis" have evolved. New York is New York because of tightly packed millions that generate wealth and art as well as explosive tensions over light and air that major code revisions in 1961 and this year have addressed. New York–based Kohn Pedersen Fox (KPF) built models that visualize urban planners' favorite acronym, Floor-Area Ratio (FAR), and show how the FAR allowance from nine lots, for example, was used to assemble air rights for Rafael Viñoly's cloudbusting 432 Park Avenue. while the exhibition explains a just-added suite of requirements on height and setbacks, plus affordable the new housing legislation.