Brothers to Brothers

Downtown L.A.'s Barker Brothers building to be restored to former glory

The ground floor of the Barker Brothers building will resume its former role as an 11,000-square-foot retail space. (Courtesy Satila Studios)

You may not find much to look at if you venture to the middle of Broadway between 7th and 8th Streets in Downtown Los Angeles’ Historic Core. A barricade and opaque scaffolding currently block the tired remains of the Barker Brothers building, an eight-story structure built by real estate investor Clara Burdette in 1909 and one of the oldest of its kind in the district. Though it was the largest store in the Barker Brothers furniture chain at the time of its completion, the company shut its doors in the 1940s like many nearby retailers who migrated from downtown to the burgeoning Wilshire Boulevard.

Thanks to brothers Ted and Oliver Grebelius of British real estate firm Satila Studios, the Barker is returning to its former glory over 80 years later. The duo recently bought the building with a plan to retrofit it as a mixed-use development and rebrand it as the Barker once again. The roughly-46,000 square feet of space constituting the upper six floors of the structure will be designated for commercial offices, while the 11,000-square-foot ground floor will be entirely dedicated to street-facing retail. The original floor plates have determined the number and ceiling heights of the floor plates, meaning the majority of the office spaces will likely be over 12 feet tall and supported by the building’s existing structural columns.

The opulent ground-floor staircase will be renovated as a dramatic fixture of the building’s primary retail space. (Courtesy Satila Studios)

A significant amount of the retrofit will include the preservation of the building’s original detailing and material palette of brick, steel, and dark wood flooring. Satila Studios is particularly invested in the preservation of its iconic grand stairway, including its large-scale archways and wooden columns, located in the center of the ground floor. The Barker is just one of many early-20th-century buildings in the L.A.’s Historic Core that are undergoing renovation. The adaptive reuse of the Lane Mortgage Building, a 12-story structure designed in 1923 by local architect Lester Loy Smith, is already underway half a block from The Barker.

Satila Studios expects the building will open by 2021.

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