Ramp Revamp

Jerde will upgrade Rose Bowl Stadium ahead of its centennial

Rose Bowl Stadium in Pasadena will be improved by popular L.A. firm Jerde. (Ted Eytan/Wikimedia Commons)

The Rose Bowl Stadium is set to undergo yet another major revamp ahead of its centennial anniversary in 2022 and Super Bowl LVI. Los Angeles-based multidisciplinary firm Jerde will rethink the accessibility, parking, and programming of the storied outdoor arena, according to Urbanize LA

Located in Pasadena’s Arroyo Seco Park, Rose Bowl Stadium has been renovated multiple times over the last 60 years. Most recently, a decade-long project totaling $183 million was completed in 2016 and brought the stadium into the 21st century with technological upgrades. Rose Bowl Stadium was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1987 and is still one of the largest in the world despite its age. It can hold a maximum capacity of 92,542 people and is regularly used by UCLA’s football program. 



Little is known yet about Jerde’s plans for the facility, but the team did release a statement about its overall goal. John Simones, chairman and design director of the architecture and planning firm, said it was an honor to be selected for the project: “As we work with the Rose Bowl Operating Company, we will look for opportunities to appropriately update the property in ways that make sense for both the Rose Bowl and the surrounding communities.” 

Originally designed by architect Myron Hunt, the Rose Bowl has been upgraded under the hands of countless collaborators since the 1960s. Jerde will become the newest expert team to join in securing the stadium for decades to come. Established in the late 1970s, Jerde quickly became a name brand in L.A. after its principal, the late Jon Jerde, completed his successful vision for the design of the 1984 Olympics Games, bringing 130 venues across Los Angeles County together under one cohesive design. A year later, the studio completed the colorful postmodern icon the Horton Plaza Mall in San Diego. Recently, Jerde completed a mixed-use entertainment and sports complex spanning 140,000 square feet in Costa Rica called Oxígeno. 

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