No Thanks

Eavesdrop: Here are all the architects and designers in Jeffrey Epstein's black book

Jeffery Epstein's estate on Little St. James Island 2013 (Navin Rajagopalan / Flickr)

Just before financier and alleged pedophile Jeffrey Epstein died in a New York City jail, New York Magazine published the A-to-Z contents of Epstein’s contacts book. Along with business tycoons, foreign royalty, and powerful politicians, there were a number of names from the worlds of art and design—including architects and interior designers.

Perhaps the most prominent of these is Alberto Pinto, the interior designer known for his lavish-beyond-lavish creations for the superrich. According to the magazine, Epstein’s $56 million Upper East Side mansion featured silky leopard print armchairs and walls covered in custom-tooled gold-leafed leather. Interior designer and countess-by-marriage Muriel Brandolini—who’s dreamed up luxe spaces for the prince and princess of Greece, among other high-profile clients—also made the list. Of course, association doesn’t mean guilt by association—rich people hang out with other rich people, especially when working on a commission or reached out to and asked to take on a project.

Joining these A&D professionals in the book were luxury hotel genius Jean-Michel Gathy, Mexican architect Ricardo Legorreta, Peter Marino, and guitar-shaped Hard Rock Hotel interiors honcho David Rockwell.

The last architect in Epstein’s contacts executed one of the most puzzling buildings in the entire Miami–Caribbean–New York City triangle of Epstein’s real estate portfolio. For the late financier’s private 70-acre island, Little St. James Island, resort designer Edward Tuttle designed the centerpiece “main house” in 2003. However, no designer has yet been named for the most enigmatic structure on the island, a blue-striped, gold-roofed “temple” on a white plinth that is surrounded by a red geometric pattern baked into the white plaza.

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