Family Ties

Preservation easement perpetually secures Eliot Noyes’s New Canaan home

The Noyes House II at night (Michael Biondo)

0The family of American architect Eliot Noyes has signed a preservation easement with the Connecticut Trust for Historic Preservation to protect the legacy and original design intent of Noyes House II through future ownership. Under the terms of the easement, the house must be kept in good repair and obtain permission from the Trust before making any alterations.

Located in New Canaan, Connecticut, a town with an architectural stockpile of modern gems like Philip Johnson’s Glass House, Noyes House II is a testament of the town’s remarkable architectural exploration during the mid-20th century.

Eliot Noyes (1910-1977) studied architecture at Harvard under Walter Gropius and was the first Director of Industrial Design at New York’s Museum of Modern Art, and a founding figure in Aspen’s Design conference. He was well-known for including design and architecture as an extension of corporate identity, also a member of the “Harvard Five” a group of architects including John M. Johansen, Marcel Breuer, Landis Gores, and Philip Johnson.

Photo of a modernist patio

The view from the open-air courtyard of Noyes House II. (Michael Biondo)

The first home Noyes designed for his family in 1947 no longer exists but was planned with the intention of expanding his family’s footprint. Now known as Noyes House II, the diagram of the home features one wing devoted for rest and a parallel wing designated for gathering. An outdoor, open-air courtyard joins the two functions in the center.

“Our family is proud to establish this easement with the Connecticut Trust for Historic Preservation to ensure the longevity of this house’s remarkable design. Preserving this house is our contribution to the larger story of New Canaan as a nexus of design representing new ideas,” said Fred Noyes, son of Eliot Noyes.

The Noyes House is privately owned. At this time, only the family may grant access.

Related Stories