Beachy Keen

James Corner Field Operations' public Manhattan beach reveals first renderings

The new beach will rise alongside David Hammons' Pier 52 sculpture. (James Corner Field Operations/Courtesy Hudson River Park Trust)

Park stewards at the Hudson River Park Trust have just revealed preliminary renderings for a new public beach in Manhattan’s Meatpacking District. The five-and-a-half acre site used to be a parking area for the sanitation department and adjacent salt shed, but in a few years, it will be a recreation area with a kayak launch, sports field, picnic areas, and a marsh.

James Corner Field Operations (JCFO) is the New York-based landscape architecture firm behind the design, while hometown firm nARCHITECTS is doing park buildings.

Black scalies play on a beach and beneath a willow tree

Rendering of the Gansevoort Peninsula park. (James Corner Field Operations/Courtesy Hudson River Park Trust)

The soon-to-be park was first announced in February of this year, and in about 18 months, the beach on Gansevoort Peninsula will open to the public on the banks of the Hudson River at the end of Little West 12th Street. While there will be ample opportunities to enjoy the outdoors, the Hudson River is still too gross to swim in (but who knows, great strides in cleanliness could be made by the time the park is complete). From the renderings, it appears the new beach will rise alongside artist David Hammons’ recreation of the demolished Pier 52Day’s End.

This is far from the only project on the Trust’s plate. The organization cares for a four-and-a-half-mile greenway on the river and is now shelling out an estimated $900 million for capital projects that include Pier 57, by Youngwoo & Associates, as well as Pier 26, which features a playground designed by OLIN and an ecology center from Rafael Viñoly. In addition, construction on Pier 55, the overwater park on piers, designed by Mathews Nielsen Landscape Architects and go-to artist for the hyper-wealthy, Thomas Heatherwick, is well underway. The new beach will also be a stone’s throw away from the Whitney Museum.

Row of trees look out into along the Hudson River

Leafy promenade against the salt marsh. (James Corner Field Operations/Courtesy Hudson River Park Trust)

This is not the first Manhattan beach as some outlets have claimed, however, not counting pre-contact or New Amsterdam times. As recently as the 1980s, during the construction of Battery Park City, New Yorkers donned bikinis and sunned themselves on the sandy construction site just north of Manhattan’s southern tip. At the same time, art organization Creative Time hosted multiple annual editions of Art on the Beach which brought large-scale public art to the desolate area. Today, way uptown, there’s a semi-secret sandy beach at Inwood’s Swindler’s Cove, thanks to a New York Restoration Project initiative to restore shorelines in the area.

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