Practice for Architecture and Urbanism (PAU) is bringing over 2,000 units of affordable housing to the East New York neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York, via a partnership with the Christian Cultural Center (CCC), an influential neighborhood church, and the Gotham Organization. The ten-acre development will be anchored by community services geared towards current residents in a neighborhood that’s been in developers’ crosshairs since a 2016 rezoning.

Rendering of the street view of PAU’s forthcoming development (Courtesy PAU)

Over the next decade-and-a-half, the team plans to deliver an “urban village” in the shadow of Starrett City, the country’s largest federally-backed affordable housing complex. In addition to 2,100 apartments spread out over nine buildings, the new development will include performing arts center, medical services, a site for vocational training, retail space for local entrepreneurs, as well as athletic facilities and over two acres of public space. The plot, now used for parking on worship days, is owned by CCC. Groundbreaking is slated for sometime in the mid-2020s.

“When we traditionally think about infrastructure, it’s transportation and utilities,” said PAU Founder and Principal Vishaan Chakrabarti, in a press release. “Today, we know that for a community to succeed it needs access to a broader infrastructure of opportunity—open space, education, health care, child care, social opportunities, and culture. Each of these things is considered in the plan that we have prepared with Gotham to advance Rev. Bernard’s vision for a sustainable and equitable community.”

Aerial view of Starrett City with the proposed development in near right midground. (Courtesy PAU)

The reverend Chakrabarti references is Rev. A.R. Bernard, leader of CCC’s 45,000-member congregation. Although his church and its future development sit about two miles south of the recently-rezoned area, the idea for the development came about as a way to protect the largely working-class community the church serves in the face of rampant developer-driven speculation in the neighborhood. East New York is second only to Long Island City, Queens, in the number of residential permit approvals last year, according to The New York Times.

As local developers line up to build in East New York, it’ll be a busy next decade for PAU, too. The New York firm was tapped to master plan Sunnyside Yards, the pasta tangle of rail lines in Queens that could be largely decked over for up to 24,000 apartments and companion facilities.

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