Más Maas

Winy Maas will be the new editor in chief of Domus (but not for long)

International Media News
Winy Maas looking straight into the eyes of you, a potential reader of Domus, which he will edit throughout 2019. (Barbra Verbij/Courtesy MVRDV)
Winy Maas looking straight into the eyes of you, a potential reader of Domus, which he will edit throughout 2019. (Barbra Verbij/Courtesy MVRDV)

Winy Maas, cofounder of MVRDV, is about to take on a new role that he, even with his wildly accomplished career, has never previously taken on. He will be the new editor in chief of Domus, the storied Italian architecture magazine. But, alas, not all things can last forever. He will only direct the publication for 10 issues to be released in 2019.

His tenure will be a part of the magazine’s 10x10x10 strategy, which aims to put 10 prominent designers behind the editorial helm over the next 10 years, each one overseeing 10 issues each. Maas will be the second participant, the first having been Italian architect and designer Michele De Lucchi, who was in charge for 2018. The magazine, however, is no stranger to having a design professional at the helm. Gio Ponti founded the media outlet in 1928, an event which will be commemorated by the completion of the 10x10x10 project in 2028.

In a statement, Maas laid out his vision for his reign:

We need an agenda for change. Our planet is subject to dramatic climate changes that require all of us—politicians, urban planners, and citizens—to accelerate our action to save it. But we are still too slow. Domus will act as such an agenda.

The issues will focus on “the city of the future,” and will collectively comprise a unified product once complete.

Maas put forward a series of questions that will shape his editorial position:

Can our cities surprise us? Can they be more responsible? More open? More curious? Brave and experimental? Truly green? Bio-diversified? Human, social, intimate, accessible, free, heterogeneous? Different? Can they be pleasant, beautiful, exciting?

He also called for things to be better:

Better materials, better bathrooms, better facades, better houses, better cities, and a better world, which ranges from the mass production of cars to bricks, from roads to infrastructure, including nanomaterials, and large-scale planning.

Readers will be able to get their hands on this better magazine in January when the first issue is scheduled to come out.

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