Irreversible Destiny

Arakawa and Gins’ legendary Bioscleave House faces the wrecking ball

Architecture East News Preservation
If purchased by a developer, the Bioscleave House could be destroyed and replaced with a standard spec house, which could sell for up to $4,000,000 in the current market. (Courtesy Brown Harris Stevens)
If purchased by a developer, the Bioscleave House could be destroyed and replaced with a standard spec house, which could sell for up to $4,000,000 in the current market. (Courtesy Brown Harris Stevens)

The Bioscleave House, designed by the late Japanese architect Arakawa and his late wife Madeline Gins, is currently listed for sale for $2,495,000 in East Hampton, New York. The experimental home is known for its peculiar design that aims to reverse the effects of aging and transform the personal well-being and longevity of its inhabitants. If purchased by a developer, the Bioscleave House, also known as Reversible Destiny, could be destroyed and replaced with a standard spec house, which could sell for up to $4,000,000 in the current market.

Photo of the Bioscleave House

The experimental home is known for its peculiar design that aims to reverse the effects of aging and transform the personal well-being and longevity of its inhabitants. (Courtesy Brown Harris Stevens)

Recently, Professors Group LLC, the anonymously-owned proprietor of the home, along with the Reversible Destiny Foundation, a nonprofit that preserves the work of Arakawa and Gins, started a campaign to save the home from demolition by devising a series of rescue plans moving forward. The current owners lack the funds to maintain the home and are being forced to sell the property.

One plan involves finding a creative investor to invest in 25 to 33 percent of Professors Group to help fund the home. The firm is also looking for collectors or investors to work with them in taking apart the home and then moving it to a nearby public venue, like the LongHouse Reserve or the Parrish Art Museum. Professors Group would also sell the house to a buyer who understands and cares about its legacy and value so that they could either work with them in caring for the property or renovate and maintain the house close to its original condition. The Bioscleave House is only 50 percent built out in F.A.R., so more additions can be made on the one-acre site.

If none of the rescue attempts prevail by January 2019, the house will be sold to a local developer who would likely demolish it and rebuild an entirely new structure.

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