As the home of AN Interior‘s parent publication, The Architect’s Newspaper, for 12 years, Manhattan’s Tribeca neighborhood has steadily developed a spicy, post-work hangout scene. The latest places to pop up in our community include four chic, inviting spaces that offer commuters and locals alike the chance to savor the sweet taste of good design (at a good price) any time of day. These stunning and simple venues—a timeless tea parlor, a cozy cocktail lounge, a sunny seafood spot, and a sky-high, Danny Meyer dining experience—all opened this year to rave reviews for their food, drinks, and decor. Next time you’re in Tribeca, you won’t want to forgo seeing these inspired interiors for yourself.

Every material inside Primo’s could be its own design centerpiece, even the branding itself. Deterre hand-picked the mismatched terrazzo flooring as well as all of the vintage items in the bar, such as the cocoon lights by Achille Castiglioni. She also sought the small statement features like the red grout lining the glass blocks. (Adrian Mesko)

Primo’s
Designer: Camilla Deterre
129 Chambers Street

Primo’s exudes a surprising and sexy contemporary twist on Italian Art Deco. Designed by model Camilla Deterre, the striking bar packs speakeasy sentimentality and midcentury modern elements into a small, two-room space hidden inside the Frederick Hotel. Long drapes with rich primary colors and cotton velvet upholstery covering curvaceous banquets give Primo’s an aura of luxury, but the soon-to-be late-night Tribeca mainstay is more informal than it appears. The chrome-outlined bar boasts an impressive organic wine collection and serves an array of dreamy classic cocktails and avant-garde absinthe coolers that will knock your socks off.

“The reward of the experience had to be more than the view,” said Woods Bagot principal Wade Little about Manhatta. “There are days when the building is shrouded in clouds.” Woods Bagot integrated muted colors inspired by the sky and the river. Personal banquets line the bar with dark blue upholstery by Moore & Giles Leather, as well as gray glass elements by Bendheim. (Emily Andrews)

Manhatta
Architect: Woods Bagot
28 Liberty Street, 60th Floor

As culinary impresario Danny Meyer’s most recent endeavor, Manhatta serves as a home in the sky for delicious food and jaw-dropping views. With less glitz than you’d expect from a restaurant of this stature—it nearly covers the entire top floor of Manhattan’s first International Style building—its elegant yet friendly atmosphere overwhelms any sense of high society. Woods Bagot’s design for the French-American eatery and bar brings dark wood, weathered granite, brass fixtures, and jewel-toned Chinese paintings together to subtly create an intimate setting with an unparalleled perspective of New York.

The bright interior of A Summer Day Cafe boasts a nautical theme that shines through every tiny detail. From the striped cushions by SOFFAH to the polished metal work by Offelia Estudio, the cafe looks like it docked into New York after a cruise around the Mediterranean. (Adrianna Glaviano)

A Summer Day Cafe
Architect: Savvy Studio
109 West Broadway

This relaxing restaurant and raw bar transports urbanites to Italy’s Amalfi Coast with an enticing seafood selection and a maritime mood. Dreamed up by architecture and branding studio Savvy, the 1,290-square-foot space oozes summer simplicity. It’s one of Tribeca restaurateur Matt Abramcyk’s latest ventures and an experiment in stylishly crafting the sensation of leisure and calm. The concept is a nod to photographer Joel Meyerowitz’s 1985 book A Summer’s Day, with a material palette inspired by boats, seaside cottages, and industrial fish markets.

The owner mixed midcentury modern style with the simplicity of Danish design by bringing in pieces like Marcel Breuer’s Cesca Chairs and the Neu Table by HAY. The focal point of the space is the dramatic L-shaped cafe counter with marble and granite from Arena Stone Products in New Jersey.

Interlude’s owner mixed midcentury modern style with the simplicity of Danish design by bringing in pieces like Marcel Breuer’s Cesca Chairs and the Neu Table by HAY. The focal point of the space is the dramatic L-shaped cafe counter with marble and granite from Arena Stone Products in New Jersey. (Josh Kim)

Interlude
Architect: Kimoy Studios
145 Hudson Street

Founded by Juilliard-trained classical pianist Josh Kim, Interlude is an Asian tea and coffee cafe that serves its signature matcha tonic and homemade baked goods in a light-filled, minimalist space, designed by KIMOY Studios. Kim combined his passions for gastronomy, design, and hot drinks to open the business (which he runs with his sister and girlfriend) this summer. The bright white marble, polished black granite, and warm wood tones found throughout the cafe were hand-selected to mimic the look and feel of a grand piano.

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