Water feature

First phase of Atlanta BeltLine’s reservoir and green space slated for 2019 opening

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Atlanta's Beltline quarry proposed as a city reservoir and green space. Pictured here: Bellwood Quarry and the proposed site for the Westside Reservoir Park in 2008, facing the city of Atlanta. (Atlanta BeltLine)
Atlanta's Beltline quarry proposed as a city reservoir and green space. Pictured here: Bellwood Quarry and the proposed site for the Westside Reservoir Park in 2008, facing the city of Atlanta. (Atlanta BeltLine)

Last week, the City of Atlanta announced that the first phase of the Atlanta BeltLine’s keystone project – a 400-foot deep former granite quarry proposed as a new reservoir and public greenspace – will open to the public in 2019.

The Atlanta Beltline is a ring of former railways around the southern capital that is being redeveloped into a 22-mile ribbon of parkway that will eventually connect 45 neighborhoods. It is the single largest economic development project the city has ever undertaken. The Bellwood Quarry itself is an impressive site at a monumental scale, and has been featured in shows and movies like The Walking Dead, Stranger Things, and The Hunger Games. 

The re-use of the quarry and parkland surrounding it, spanning 280 acres, is no small task. In partnership with the BeltLine, the Department of Watershed Management has drained the mineral pit of its standing water and is now boring a massive mile-long tunnel connecting it to the Chattahoochee River, with the end goal of providing Atlanta with 30 days of reservoir water rather than its current 5-day supply.

Although the quarry is closed to the public for construction, it seems to be proceeding at a clip, and this announcement may be a hint that the process is being expedited in line with the end of Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed’s term in November. After all, the quarry is a highly-anticipated legacy project.

The RFP for design proposals for the park surrounding the reservoir closed yesterday after opening in late July.

https://beltlineorg-wpengine.netdna-ssl.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/ABI-Park-Master-Plan-Westside-Reservoir-Subarea-9.pdf

The total area of the proposed Westside Reservoir Park and adjacent neighborhoods, from an original plan released in 2008. (Atlanta BeltLine)

According to an anonymous source close to the project, the first phase of the Westside Reservoir Park will likely be a smaller prototype park on a small fraction of the total property, meant to garner public enthusiasm and draw investment while the larger reservoir project undergoes construction. Whether this pocket park will be completed by 2019 is a matter of skepticism within the organization, according to AN’s source.

One factor complicating matters is a recent shakedown in leadership: Paul Morris, the former CEO of Atlanta BeltLine, Inc., stepped down three weeks ago after a heated public controversy surrounding the organization’s shaky commitment to affordable housing in new development around the park. However, Morris’ replacement, Brian McGowan, brings a hefty amount of experience in civic and economic development to the seat, having formerly served as the Executive Vice President of the Metro Atlanta Chamber, CEO of Invest Atlanta, and is now leaving a position as a Principal at international law firm Dentons.

Whether the first chapter of Bellwood Quarry’s extensive refurbishment will be open to the public by 2019 or not, the BeltLine and its partners have, at least for the time being, redirected public attention away from what’s sure to be a long and drawn-out debate about what the BeltLine – with all its ecological, recreational, and economic benefits – will mean for surrounding neighborhoods in the long term.

This is not a question limited to the BeltLine. Hopefully the project will spur lawmakers to push for more affordable housing than is currently proposed by ABI, which now works in tandem with the Atlanta Housing Authority. For the scale of the project – which circles the entirety of Metro Atlanta with a population of 5.7 million – 5,600 affordable units seems like a low bar.

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