Up and Coming

Morris Adjmi’s 10 best new buildings around New York City

Architecture East Newsletter
(Courtesy Morris Adjmi Architects)
(Courtesy Morris Adjmi Architects)

New York–based Morris Adjmi Architects is having a moment.

The buildings coming from Adjmi’s firm look nothing like the tall, boxy glass skyscrapers proliferating around the five boroughs. Instead, contextual designs and subtle nods to history lead the way, allowing the buildings to integrate into their surroundings while distinguishing themselves with modern touches.

With projects coming up left and right, here are ten examples of Morris Adjmi’s buildings around New York, ranging from the already built to the up-and-coming.

Sterling Mason (Courtesy Morris Adjmi Architects)

Sterling Mason, 71 Laight Street, Manhattan
2016

This condominium building in TriBeCa is composed of two joined buildings: one renovated brick warehouse from 1905, and a newly built metallic duplicate immediately adjacent to it.



(Via New York YIMBY)

70 Henry, Brooklyn
2017

Located in Brooklyn Heights, Morris Adjmi’s three-story addition to an existing 19th-century masonry structure is distinguishable by its contrasting brick cladding and projecting metal-framed windows.

(Via New York YIMBY)

138 North 10th Street, Brooklyn
2017

One of Morris Adjmi’s more modern buildings, this six-story residential building in Williamsburg has a broad-formed concrete base and a white brick facade punctuated with projecting warehouse windows.

(Courtesy Morris Adjmi Architects)

83 Walker, Manhattan
2017 

In a nod to the historic architectural style that has shaped New York’s buildings, 83 Walker’s concrete facade appears to be imprinted with the image of a traditional cast-iron building.

(Via 6sqft)

465 Pacific, Brooklyn
2017

One of the largest condominium developments in Boerum Hill, 465 Pacific uses scale, massing, and materials to balance the site’s location in a historic neighborhood that’s also a commercial corridor. The exteriors are clad in red brick with large, deeply-inset windows. The ground floor and two upper stories are finished in dark steel in reference to the Mohawk ironworkers that lived in the neighborhood during the 1940s and 50s.

(Via New York YIMBY)

540 Hudson, Manhattan
2018

This site used to be an old gas station in the West Village but has been left largely vacant; Morris Adjmi’s proposed mixed-use building is expected to bring residential apartments, retail space, and community facility space. The brick facade undulates and has embedded corner turrets and projecting bay windows. The Landmarks Preservation Committee ruled that the design needed revisions; the final design will be slightly different than the image above. 

(Via 6sqft)

520 West 20th Street, Manhattan
2018

Known as “The Warehouse,” the Carolina Manufacturing Company’s former distribution facility and apparel-manufacturing space right next to the High Line is getting a new three-story, glass and steel addition. There is a fifth-floor “neck,” a wrap-around terrace on top of the original structure, and unnecessary columns have been eliminated to create an open floor plan.

(Via 6sqft)

30 East 31st Street, Manhattan
2018

This site used to be the Romanesque Revival parish house of the Madison Avenue Baptist Church, but that building was demolished in 2015. This new 40-story tower will reference the church’s Gothic details with six columns whose diagonal grid pattern will resemble barrel vaults.

Previous design on the left, revised design on the right (Via New York YIMBY)

363 Lafayette, Manhattan
2018

Following a couple of tweaks to gain the Landmarks Preservation Commission’s approval, 363 Lafayette’s design is now approved and the NoHo building is on its way toward construction. The revised design has floor-by-floor setbacks angled towards Bond Street, and terra cotta will be one of the main materials used.

43 West 17th Street (Courtesy Morris Adjmi Architects)

42 West 18th Street (Courtesy Morris Adjmi Architects)

42 West 18th Street and 43 West 17th Street, Manhattan
2020

Two distinct towers comprise this residential complex, which is meant to evoke the history of the Ladies’ Mile Historic District. One building has a translucent screen depicting the image of a traditional facade; the other building (which ) has a masonry facade with a curtain wall.

Related Stories