LADG

Inside the diverse practice of the Los Angeles Design Group

Architecture Design Studio Visit West
Inside the diverse practice of the Los Angeles Design Group. Seen here: the Oyster Gourmet at L.A.'s Grand Central Market. (Courtesy The LADG / Oliver Pojzman / IRIS)
Inside the diverse practice of the Los Angeles Design Group. Seen here: the Oyster Gourmet at L.A.'s Grand Central Market. (Courtesy The LADG / Oliver Pojzman / IRIS)

The offices of the Los Angeles Design Group (LADG) are located on a sleepy street in Venice, California, that even on cloudy days looks a bit sun-bleached. There, a few blocks from the ocean in a diminutive storefront open to the street, one can find Claus Benjamin Freyinger, Andrew Holder, and their small team of designers charting a unique trajectory in what one might call “disciplinary architecture.”

“[Things like] structure are always subordinate to the [disciplinary] agenda we are trying to pursue,” Freyinger said, describing a vibrant grid of project views organized neatly along the main studio wall. He continued, “We are trying to work against the understanding of a building as a collection of integrated systems, one piled on top of the other.” Which is not to say that the firm does not consider structure or systems, but rather that it focuses instead on subverting the all-too-easy tendency those components have of making themselves apparent in the final work. Instead, LADG explodes the building process horizontally and explores each component—drawing, model, and detail—individually, in pursuit of “what happens when each idea develops independently of hierarchy,” as Holder put it.

After 13 years, the firm has produced a compellingly diverse collection of work ranging from installations to interiors to complete structures, swapping disciplinary and professional focus with each project.

The Kid Gets out of the Picture at the Harvard GSD. (Courtesy Justin Knight / Harvard GSD)

(Courtesy Justin Knight / Harvard GSD)

The Kid
Cambridge, Massachusetts

The Kid Gets out of the Picture, installed at Loeb Library at the Harvard Graduate School of Design in 2016, was developed in concert with architects First Office, Hirsuta, and Laurel Broughton / Andrew Kovacs for Materials & Applications. The contemporary interpretation of an English picturesque garden is based on priest and artist William Gilpin’s travel sketches, which LADG mined for symbolic and literal inspiration in its attempts to explore “topics left unfinished by the picturesque.” With the installation, the designers explored “clumps,” the collections of heterogeneous objects and plants used by picturesque designers to organize their compositions. Here, the designers arrange a collection of plaster-coated, plywood-rib-framed drapery atop wooden-beam and stacked-block bases.



Surefoot Santa Monica. (Courtesy Todd Weaver)

(Courtesy Todd Weaver)

Surefoot Santa Monica 
Santa Monica, CA

The interiors for Surefoot Santa Monica are a creative solution for an abstract programmatic challenge: Create a storefront for a shop with no inventory. The ski-boot store acts as a fitting room mostly, where patrons pick out and get sized up for new custom-made ski boots produced off-site. The firm toyed with the formal complexities of lofted and faceted finishes for the project, creating a collection of object-like surfaces that act independently of one another. Gable-shaped plywood display walls—punctuated by boxed-out display cases—hold forth under a billowing plaster tent.

Oyster Gourmet. (Courtesy The LADG / Oliver Pojzman / IRIS)

(Courtesy The LADG / Oliver Pojzman / IRIS)

Oyster Gourmet
Los Angeles

The Oyster Gourmet is a mechanical kiosk designed to house a champagne and oyster bar in L.A’s Grand Central Market. The structure’s operable walls fold up and down via hand crank, creating an awning for the bar below when fully extended. The structure is made out of plywood ribs, canvas cloth, and steel supports. But the built form of the mollusk-shaped eatery is but one manifestation of the kinetic kiosk—the pink-hued worm’s eye axonometric and gray-scale floorplan drawings are also of merit.

Los Angeles Design Group has designed a charred cedar wood-clad house in Los Angeles’s Silver Lake neighborhood inspired by Marcel Breuer’s Whitney Museum. (Courtesy Nathan Riley)

The building steps out in a manner that mimics a nearby hillside and has a backyard oculus window oriented toward the slope. (Courtesy Nathan Riley)

Armstrong Avenue Residence
Los Angeles

The Armstrong Avenue Residence is a 1,894-square-foot renovation of an existing split-level house in Los Angeles. The charred cedar-clad “upside down house” is organized with a top-floor living room located above an unceremonial set of bedroom, study, and garage spaces. The setup ensures the living areas have the best view of a nearby reservoir, which can also be seen from a cyclopean bedroom window that has been torqued to be in line with the water feature. The inset bay window is mimicked along the back of the house via Marcel Breuer–inspired massing, creating a house that steps out in parallel with the scrubby hillside behind.

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