"Verbal" Approval

Elon Musk says N.Y.-D.C. Hyperloop has government approval

East Transportation
Elon Musk says N.Y.-D.C. Hyperloop has government approval. Seen here: a prototype Hyperloop tube from Hyperloop One, a Los Angeles–based company that uses the Hyperloop technology originally conceived by Elon Musk. Musk is not part of Hyperloop One. (Courtesy Алексей М/Flickr)
Elon Musk says N.Y.-D.C. Hyperloop has government approval. Seen here: a prototype Hyperloop tube from Hyperloop One, a Los Angeles–based company that uses the Hyperloop technology originally conceived by Elon Musk. Musk is not part of Hyperloop One. (Courtesy Алексей М/Flickr)

Elon Musk tweeted earlier this morning that he received government approval to start building a New York-Philadelphia-Baltimore-D.C Hyperloop, as reported by engadget.

His series of tweets indicate that while The Boring Company, the infrastructure and tunneling company that Musk founded, received “verbal” government approval, there are still steps to be made before getting formal approval. If the project is actually approved, construction will begin in conjunction with the company’s other talked-about project: underground tunnels in L.A. that aim to relieve vehicular congestion.

Musk is already plotting future connections elsewhere, too. One of his follow-up tweets reveals that the next Hyperloop would likely be an L.A-San Francisco track, and maybe even a Texas loop (Dallas-Houston-San Antonio-Austin).

A Hyperloop in the Northeast Corridor could do wonders for the deteriorating rail infrastructure at New York’s Pennsylvania Station, which has resulted in a “summer of hell.” Right now, a regular Amtrak train between New York and Washington D.C takes approximately three and a half hours; the same trip is two-and-a-half on the Acela Express. With a Hyperloop, however, it will only take 29 minutes.

Apparently, local officials in charge of the cities involved were not looped into the conversation; New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio’s press secretary tweeted that “this is news to City Hall.”

It’s unclear who Musk received this verbal approval from, though it is likely someone from the Trump administration (where he briefly served as one of President Trump’s advisors), according to CNBC. It will take numerous hurdles before Musk can even begin drilling a hole; he would need approval from the federal Department of Transportation, not to mention the various states, counties, cities, and elected officials.

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