Snøhetta has released new renderings for the firm’s ambitious reimagining of the Willamette Falls near Portland, Oregon.

Site section through looking at an elevated vantage point, including rehabilitated and new structures. (Courtesy Snøhetta)

The project aims to restore public access to the waterfalls by stringing a long, sinuous path through the formerly industrial site. (The Architect’s Newspaper first covered the development when it was unveiled in 2015.) The Willamette Falls is the second-largest waterfall by volume in the United States and has been cut off from nearby downtown Oregon City for over a century.

The falls are currently flanked by a collection of decrepit industrial buildings and a hydroelectric dam; some of those industrial buildings will be removed and replaced with native riparian landscapes while others will be redeveloped to accommodate new uses.

Site section showing public plaza and promenade at the northern end of the site. (Courtesy Snøhetta)

The new renderings for the project depict a simply-articulated path connecting the various elements along the long, narrow, and linear site leading up to the falls.



Site section through rehabilitated mill complex. (Courtesy Snøhetta)

The proposed pathway—which has been designed to accommodate cyclical and historic flood levels and is seismically resilient—starts at the northern end of the site, where several old industrial buildings will be cleared away and a flour mill from the 1890s will be restored. The path here will connect to an old fuel dock that is being repurposed as a public vantage point and dock. After wrapping around the mill, the path transforms into a wide boardwalk overlooking the river that spills out onto a large public plaza framed by historic and new structures. A portion of the plaza wraps over the boardwalk to create a vantage point over the river.

Site section through the waterfall area of the site where the path bridges directly over the craggy landscapes surrounding the waterfalls. (Courtesy Snøhetta)

At the eastern end of the plaza, the elevated path picks back up, crossing over a creek in order to reach the a complex made up of more restored mill structures. Here, the mill structures—including antique boilers and other original machinery—will be preserved and opened for public use. The path splinters at the mill complex in order to provide elevated vangates and access to public terraces and groves of coniferous trees. The path ends at a broad promenade at the falls, where visitors can peer out over the dynamic landscape. Here, visitors can observe 360-degree views of the waterfalls and experience the cliffsides from pathways engineered to be supported by existing structures.

The Willamette Falls proposal is scheduled to be unveiled June 3 at a public ceremony, and construction is expected to begin June 2018.

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