The James A. Farley Building on 34th Street and Eighth Avenue will be given a $1.6 billion overhaul as it is repurposed by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (SOM) from being a former post office to a rail hub.

Governor Cuomo announced the plans last Friday, but he had originally floated the idea back in September. The Farley Building sits to the west of Penn Station and under Cuomo’s scheme, it will go from once holding letters to instead accommodating 700,000 square feet of retail, commercial, and dining areas with the Moynihan Hall serving as a train hall for Amtrak and LIRR services.

(Courtesy Empire State Development)

“Fifty years after the loss of the original Penn Station structure, passengers will once again experience a world-class rail hub worthy of New York,” Cuomo said in a press release. “The Farley Building’s Moynihan Train Hall is two decades in the making, and we are proud that this project is finally a reality. With better access to trains and subways and state-of-the-art infrastructure, the Moynihan Train Hall seamlessly joins history, architectural design, and function, bringing the nation’s busiest rail station into the 21st century.”

McKim, Mead and White designed both the Farley Building and the original Penn Station. The latter was lost in 1963 but now the New York architecture firm’s work will once again be used for the station, serving as a grand entrance. Inside Moynihan Hall, where nine platforms and 17 tracks will be accessible, a 92-foot high skylight will be built above the hall’s iconic steel trusses. The hall will also facilitate access to the Eighth Avenue Subway as well as provide an entrance to the station from 9th Avenue.



In addition to the work being done at Moynihan Hall, the width of the 33rd Street Corridor will be almost tripled as part of a “comprehensive redesign” of the LIRR concourse. Cuomo’s office also stated plans for “extensive renovation” to the adjacent Seventh and Eighth Avenue subway stations. Furthermore, additional changes to Penn Station include upgraded lighting and signage, new digital screens, and adding LED panels that projecting blue skies.

According to Crain’s New York, Cuomo’s plans will only aid around a fifth of Penn Station’s 600,000 daily commuters. The work is scheduled to be complete by the end of 2020. That, however, might not be soon enough for those in line for what Cuomo has described as an upcoming “summer of hell” with track shutdowns for repairs set to cause commuter despair. “You’ll see… breakdowns for the foreseeable future,” said Cuomo. “We need major renovations at Penn and… an organization that can actually do them.”

“We would be crazy to do something without Vornado,” Tom Wright, president of the Regional Plan Association, who was named Cuomo’s committee for the Penn Station project, told Crain’s. “They have shown themselves willing to put skin in the game, and they see what’s good for the public is also good for them. An improved station boosts the value of so much of Vornado’s real estate.”

The plan is being carried out and financed by Empire State Development and Related Companies, Vornado Realty LP, and construction firm Skanska’s U.S. arm. Divided up, $550 million will be state supplied and $420 million will come from Amtrak, the MTA, the Port Authority and federal grants. The remaining $630 will be provided by Vornado and Skanska who in return for building it will have the right to run the new commercial concourse.

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