BQX

Municipal Art Society’s Jane Jacobs tour to be protested

East Urbanism
Municipal Art Society Jane Jacobs tour protested. (Courtesy POWWA)

[UPDATE 5/5/17, MAS President Elizabeth Goldstein issued this response to UPROSE, but as one Brooklynite put it, “Jane herself must have intervened by arranging the weather to rain out today’s walking tour.”]

The Municipal Art Society of New York (MAS) will host its annual tribute to Jane Jacobs with a series of free guided tours around the city from May 5 to 7.

One of these tours, referred to by the society as “Jane’s Walk,” will explore the proposed Brooklyn–Queens Connector (BQX) waterfront light rail link. However, that tour is now coming under attack by local residents due to be served by the proposed rail service.

(Courtesy the Municipal Arts Society of New York)

Elizabeth Yeampierre, executive director of Uprose, Brooklyn’s oldest Puerto Rican community–based organization, has written an open letter protesting the walk. In the letter, Yeampierre asks: “What would Jane Jacobs do if she were alive today and learned that real estate developers had appropriated the Municipal Arts Society’s 2017 Jane’s Walk to promote a $2.5 billion streetcar that will deliberately gentrify communities for their own benefit?”



Yempierre’s letter is addressed to MAS’s new president, Elizabeth Goldstein, and asks that they rethink this particular tour. Furthermore, Yeampierre asks, “are your board members invested in these developments along this corridor? We hope there is no conflict of interest.”

The light rail plan is not a simple one and MAS may be innocent, but its leadership and board has just been through a bruising battle with its own membership, a process that saw the firing of its last president. One wonders who is running the Society. They should not be sponsoring tours like this without first reaching out to the residents of the community in which the take place or pass through.

On MAS’s website, a description of the event reads: “All of the MAS-sponsored walks combine the simple act of exploring neighborhoods with personal observations, local history, and civic engagement. A typical walk is 90 minutes and is free and open to the public.”

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