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Development team releases renderings for North Hollywood’s new skyline

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A development team made up of Trammell Crow Company, Greenland USA, Cesar Chavez Foundation, architects Gensler, and landscape architects Melendrez, Inc. has released renderings showcasing a new Transit-Oriented Community project for L.A.'s North Hollywood neighborhood. (Courtesy L.A. Metro)
A development team made up of Trammell Crow Company, Greenland USA, Cesar Chavez Foundation, architects Gensler, and landscape architects Melendrez, Inc. has released renderings showcasing a new Transit-Oriented Community project for L.A.'s North Hollywood neighborhood. (Courtesy L.A. Metro)

Areas around the only heavy rail transit stop in Los Angeles’s San Fernando Valley are poised to change dramatically as a new plan calling for the addition of over 1,500 residential units to the area coalesces.

The redevelopment plan—orchestrated as a joint proposal by developers Trammell Crow Company, Greenland USA, Cesar Chavez Foundation, architects Gensler, and landscape architects Melendrez—also aims to bring roughly 450,000-square feet of offices and 150,000-square feet of ground-level commercial spaces to a collection of lots owned by the Los Angeles Metropolitan Transportation Authority (L.A. Metro) surrounding the North Hollywood Red Line station. The plans will also consolidate a series of bus turnaround areas around the station into a single transfer complex.

 The redevelopment scheme would aim to embed pedestrian-friendly planning principles along the areas surrounding the transit stop. (Courtesy L.A. Metro)

The redevelopment scheme would aim to embed pedestrian-friendly planning principles along the areas surrounding the transit stop. (Courtesy L.A. Metro)

Urbanize LA reports that the plan, to be detailed in an upcoming presentation by the development to L.A. Metro’s San Fernando Valley Service Council (SFVSC), comes after Trammell Crow and Greenland had initially proposed two competing schemes.



A rendering of the proposed project showcases a collection of mixed-use towers surrounding a series of open plaza areas and the new bus turnaround. The renderings depict the tallest tower as a podium-style structure located at the northern corner of the site, with a much shorter, perimeter block structure topped with a green roof standing beside it. The back corner of the site is populated by several courtyard apartment building complexes and a mid-rise housing tower. Another tall tower will be located on a corner opposing the main portion of the development.

Plans for the redevelopment scheme revolve around consolidating a bus turnaround facility. (Courtesy L.A. Metro)

Plans for the redevelopment scheme revolve around consolidating a bus turnaround facility. (Courtesy L.A. Metro)

The complex is designed as a Transit Oriented Community (TOC), a notion that builds on transit-accessibility at the core of Transit Oriented Development (TOD) projects by including “holistic community development” that engages not only with mass transit but also facilitates pedestrian activities, according to the report that will be shown to the SFVSC. The plan comes out of a series of community scoping meetings conducted by L.A. Metro and the developers that uncovered historic preservation of the surrounding NoHo Arts District and balance between height, density, and pedestrianism as major community concerns.

As such, the development will aim to engage and building upon existing street life in the pedestrian-heavy node while also adding generous paseos between various structures to create pedestrian paths around the station. The project will also include an unspecified number of affordable housing units.

A detailed timeline for the project has not been released.

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