Edinburgh

BIG, Adjaye, and wHY among seven shortlisted teams for Ross Pavilion Design Competition

Architecture International
BIG, Adjaye, and wHY among seven shortlisted for Ross Pavilion Design Competition. (© Malcolm Reading Consultants / David Springford, via ArchDaily)
BIG, Adjaye, and wHY among seven shortlisted for Ross Pavilion Design Competition. (© Malcolm Reading Consultants / David Springford, via ArchDaily)

This article was originally published on ArchDaily as “BIG, Adjaye Among 7 Shortlisted for Ross Pavilion Design Competition.”

The Ross Development Trust, in collaboration with the City of Edinburgh Council and Malcolm Reading Consultants, has announced the seven finalists teams that will compete for the design of the new Ross Pavilion in the heart of Edinburgh, Scotland. Located in West Princes Street Gardens below Edinburgh Castle and at the intersection of the UNESCO World Heritage recognized Old and New Towns, the £25 million project will feature a landmark pavilion to replace an existing bandstand, a visitors center with cafe, and a subtle reimagination of the surrounding landscape. The new pavilion will host a range of cultural arts programming.

(© Malcolm Reading Consultants / David Springford, via ArchDaily)

(© Malcolm Reading Consultants / David Springford, via ArchDaily)

From an entry pool of 125 teams, the following seven were unanimously selected to continue on to the second stage of the competition:

  • Adjaye Associates (UK) with Morgan McDonnell, BuroHappold, Turley, JLL, Arup, Plan A Consultants, Charcoalblue and Sandy Brown Associates
  • BIG Bjarke Ingels Group (Denmark) with jmarchitects, GROSS. MAX., WSP | Parsons Brinckerhoff, Alan Baxter Associates, JLL, Speirs + Major, Charcoalblue, and People Friendly Design
  • Flanagan Lawrence (UK) with Gillespies, Expedition Engineering, JLL, Arup, and Alan Baxter Associates
  • Page \ Park Architects (UK) with West8, BuroHappold, Muir Smith Evans, and Charcoalblue
  • Reiulf Ramstad Arkitekter (Norway) with GROSS. MAX., AECOM, Groves-Raines Architects, and Charcoalblue
  • wHY (USA) with GRAS, Groves-Raines Architects, Arup, O Street, Creative Concern, Noel Kingsbury, Yann Kersalé Studio, Lawrence Barth, Stuco, Alan Cumming, Aaron Hicklin, Alison Watson, Peter Ross, Adrian Turpin, and Beatrice Colin
  • William Matthews Associates (UK) and Sou Fujimoto Architects (Japan) with GROSS. MAX., BuroHappold, Purcell, and Scott Hobbs



(© Malcolm Reading Consultants / David Springford, via ArchDaily)

(© Malcolm Reading Consultants / David Springford, via ArchDaily)

“We were absolutely delighted by the response of designers from around the world to the competition’s first stage. The quality of the 125 teams on the longlist sent a strong signal that the international design community regards this as an inspirational project for Edinburgh that has huge potential to reinvigorate this prestigious site,” said The Chairman of the Ross Development Trust and Competition Jury Chair, Norman Springford.

“Selecting the shortlist with our partners from City of Edinburgh Council was an intense and demanding process. We’re thrilled that our final shortlist achieved a balance of both international and UK talent, emerging and established studios. Now the teams will have 11 weeks to do their concept designs – and we’re looking forward to seeing these and sharing them with the public.”

(© Malcolm Reading Consultants / David Springford, via ArchDaily)

(© Malcolm Reading Consultants / David Springford, via ArchDaily)

Finalists will have until June 9, 2017, to complete concept designs for the pavilion, visitor’s center, and site, which will need to fully integrate into the existing Gardens, which are of outstanding cultural significance and operated and managed by the City of Edinburgh Council as Common Good Land. A public and digital exhibition will follow in mid-June, with a winner expected to be announced in early August. Construction is expected to begin in 2018.

For more information, visit the competition website, here.

News via Malcolm Reading Consultants.

Written by Patrick Lynch.
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