Pixel Perfect

Specsheet>Rugs of the future

Product Spec Sheet
(Courtesy Seletti)
(Courtesy Seletti)

Disjointed patterns—with a mish-mash of geometries, distorted prints, and varied textures—is gaining steam as a popular motif in the realm of rugs.

Hybrid
Seletti

This collection of fragmented, East-meets-West rugs debuted at Maison&Objet 2017 and expands upon a collection of tableware with the same name and design inspiration. The two halves use complementary colors to tie the contrasting styles together. Hybrid is made from sustainable recycled polyester.

(Courtesy cc-tapis)

(Courtesy cc-tapis)

Visioni
Patricia Urquiola for cc-tapis

This Escher-like geometric rug fuses traditional hand weaving—produced in Nepal, with a blend of Himalayan wool and pure silk—with an unconventional design. Subtle earth tones make this collection incredibly versatile, and still surprising.

(Courtesy Elisa Strozyk)

(Courtesy Elisa Strozyk)

Colored Wooden Rugs
Elisa Strozyk

From a distance, these marvels appear to be traditional kilim rugs—or even a tile inlay, depending on the pattern—but in reality they are moldable wooden textiles that can be laid flat or sculpted into 3-D shapes.

(Courtesy Tadigh O'Neill Design)

(Courtesy Tadigh O’Neill Design)

Raised Pile
Tadigh O’Neill Design

Tadigh O’Neill takes a multi-step process to create optical illusion rugs using silk reclaimed from sari production. Drawing from his background in construction and photography, O’Neill creates a 3-D rendering of an architectural structure including shadows (in this case two A-frame houses and a shelve cabinet), then flattens the image and chooses corresponding Pantone colors.

(Courtesy Stephan Hamel)

(Courtesy Stephan Hamel)

Zitanpixel
Stephan Hamel

Inspired by the Roma (gypsies), Stephan Hamel selected original Russian and Hungarian pieces from the 1920s to 1970s that feature pixelated images of traditional floral motifs. The nomadic people used these rugs to create a sense of familiarity no matter where they went. Hamel added long sheep’s fur to update the style for modern use.

(Courtesy Tarkett)

(Courtesy Tarkett)

Alphabet
Stefan Sagmeister for Tarkett

The most recent addition to Tarkett’s Collections Ifinies line is Alphabet by artist and designer Stefan Sagmeister of Sagmeister & Walsh. This line creates a colorful abstract pattern from positive phrases such as “feel others feel” and “create real beauty.”  The prints are available in three color variations

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