New York firm Tod Williams Billie Tsien Architects (TWBTA) has unveiled plans for an expansion to the Frederik Meijer Gardens and Sculpture Park in Grand Rapids, Michigan. The $115 million project will see a variety of new spaces added to the center, including a Welcome Center (60,000 square feet), Covenant Learning Center (20,000 square feet), and two sculpture gardens.

“For last two years 750,000 people each year have come out to visit Meijer Gardens. When the current entryway was built, we were getting 200,000 people coming in, so we need to grow,” said President and CEO of the park David Hooker speaking to local news station, WoodTV. “The new facilities will be an amazing expression of our mission never before imagined,” he added, speaking in a press release. “We strongly believe the growth of Meijer Gardens will continue and that the organization will thrive for generations to come.”

Meijer Gardens expansion

Sculpture garden entry plaza. (Courtesy the Frederik Meijer Gardens & Sculpture Park)

Meijer Gardens opened in 1995 and since then has been a success, providing educational programs, housing art, and offering peaceful garden areas to the public. TWBTA’s design will allow Meijer Gardens to expand annual horticulture exhibitions, include for galleries for sculptures, and incorporate more event spaces. In addition to this, circulatory space and parking capacity will be increased.

Along with the aforementioned spaces, a new Peter C. and Emajean Cook Transportation Center; an expanded and upgraded Frederik Meijer Gardens Amphitheater; a “Scenic Corridor”; outdoor picnic pavilion; and new Padnos Families Rooftop Sculpture Garden will be included in the scheme.



(Courtesy the Frederik Meijer Gardens & Sculpture Park)

(Courtesy the Frederik Meijer Gardens & Sculpture Park)

“We are deeply honored to be have been selected by Frederik Meijer Gardens & Sculpture Park for this special project,” said Tod Williams of TWBTA in a press release. “From our very first visit, we were struck by the incredible quality of the sculpture collection and its sensitive installation throughout the grounds, as well as by their magnificent Japanese Garden. We saw that the place and the people here are unique.”

Ground is expected to break on the project in fall this year with completion due for 2021. So far $102 million of the proposal’s projected costs have been raised through donations. A campaign is underway to raise the remaining $13 million in capital.

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