NYC

This interactive map lets you see what buildings are rising in your neighborhood

City Terrain East Newsletter Urbanism
This interactive map lets you see what buildings are rising in your neighborhood. Pictured here: Lower Manhattan. (Screenshot via DNAinfo)
This interactive map lets you see what buildings are rising in your neighborhood. Pictured here: Lower Manhattan. (Screenshot via DNAinfo)

From tenements to today’s skyscrapers, adequate light and air are essential to a livable New York. The city’s first zoning code enshrined access to these elements, and now, with supertalls ringing Central Park and cropping up in downtown Brooklyn, sunlight and fresh air are again central considerations in debates around the city’s current and future form.

To keep tabs on the dizzying array of new construction (supertall and less so) in New York, DNAinfo has put together an interactive 3D map that lets residents track development in their neighborhoods.

How Tall Will New Buildings in My NYC Neighborhood Be?” highlights buildings in two main categories. The first, in turquoise, maps permitted construction, while the second, in royal blue, illustrates proposed buildings—those that have been presented to the community, but haven’t been approved by the city. Yellow boxes represent DNAinfo partners, and users are encouraged to add projects the paper hasn’t reported on (these items appear on the map in red). The volumes depict height (not design) as reported by the city, the developer, or other relevant agency.

The map asks users to enter a neighborhood to see new buildings are going up. This reporter zeroed in on Tribeca, The Architect’s Newspaper‘s home base, and selected a proposed structure on Park Row. Hovering over the rectangle revealed a DNAinfo story on the building, which is being developed by L+M. Other items that are going up but haven’t been written about by the outlet have links to DOB documents or information that corroborates the building’s height.

Here are the sexy details: The paper used the city’s MapPluto for the base map, which combines tax lot–level data from the Department of City Planning with data from the Department of Finance’s Digital Tax Map. Building heights are calculated using the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat‘s formula, and all data is September 2016.

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