If you can’t get to the grand opening of Herzog and de Meuron’s Elbphilharmonie (Elbe Philharmonic) concert hall in Hamburg on January 11, then fear not. A drone tour is on hand to whizz you through and around the building, showing off the Swiss firm’s breathtaking interiors.

The drones explore the wooden circulatory areas, as well as the main concert hall which is clad with acoustic gypsum fiberboard panels. The waterfront complex features three concert halls, a plaza for public viewing that provides sweeping views across Hamburg, and 45 private waterfront apartments. The largest concert hall—with a capacity of 2,100—floats within the main building on 362 spring assemblies for further sound-proofing.

(Screenshot from the Elbphilharmonie's countdown website)

(Screenshot from the Elbphilharmonie’s countdown website)

Drones also travel outside the building which features a shimmering glazed facade and a dramatic wave-like roofscape, mimicking the nearby river Elbe. Here, audiences can take in and fully appreciate the 1,100 glass panes that comprise the facade from close-up views. With each panel measuring a minimum of 13 feet across, many have been spotted with small dark gray reflective dots. Some panels are curved to distort the facade’s reflection of the river, thus creating a shimmering effect.

Each panel is unique and individually crafted. While creating an appealing aesthetic, the reflective glass facilitates temperature regulation by reducing heat gains. Structurally, the building relies on the support of roughly 1,700 reinforced concrete piles: It’s located where a waterfront warehouse stood until the project began (though its brick facade is still there) just under a decade ago.

Click here for the drone tour!

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