The love for Brutalism is on the rise in the U.S., especially on the East Coast. In late 2015, the book Heroic compiled buildings in Boston built between 1960 and 1977. This was based on an exhibition of Boston’s concrete buildings at pinkcomma gallery, itself born from the city’s architectural community move to save Boston City Hall. As more concrete looks destined for demolition, interest in Brutalism has swelled: Cue #SOSBrutalism and the like. Boston, of course, isn’t the only Brutalist haven. Washington D.C. too is home to many post-war relics/icons (the choice is yours) and now a map is out to help you find them.

When Blue Crow Media published their Brutalist London Map, they didn’t disappoint. Now the British publishing firm has released another Brutalist map, “Brutalist Washington”—their fourth to date after their Art Deco London and Constructivist Moscow maps. Founder of BrutalistDC Deane Madsen was also on hand to help with the map, which features 40 examples of “concretopia” ranging from Harry Weese’s Gallery Place Chinatown Metro Station to the Hirshhorn Museum and the Sculpture Garden by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (SOM).

Hirshhorn Musuem and Sculpture Garden by Skidmore, owings & Merrill. Completed in 1974. (Courtesy Deane Madsen Gallery)

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill. Completed in 1974. (Courtesy Deane Madsen Gallery)

“As more and more examples of classic Brutalism face demolition by neglect, we hope that putting these examples of D.C.’s Brutalist architecture on the map will foster public appreciation that ensures their longevity,” said Madsen in a press release. In post-war America, Washington D.C. witnessed a plethora of Brutalist architecture rise up in wake of the 1945 Redevelopment Act. Nathaniel Owings (of SOM) and Chinese-American architect I.M. Pei were the forebearers of the master planning process of the city, notably for the National Mall vicinity and Weese’s subway station in the 1970s.

The Brutalist Washington Map is available for $10.00.

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