Beijing-based MAD Architects has revealed plans for the design its latest project, the China Philharmonic Hall.

The 286,000-square foot music hall is located on a 2.86-acre property in Beijing’s Central Business District and has been designed in collaboration with acoustics expert Yasuhisa Toyota in an effort to create a state-of-the-art music venue for China’s capital city. Toyota was also an acoustics designer for the Walt Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles, the Philharmonie de Paris, and the Suntory Hall in Japan, and is known as a master in the field.

The concert hall, surrounded on two sides by vegetation and a lotus pond, is designed to be approached through park areas and act as an urban refuge. In a press release from the firm, Ma Yansong, founder and principal at MAD Architects, describes the project as a place of respite in what is otherwise a hub of trade and commerce, saying, “We wanted to create a pure and sacred oasis in the midst of the bustling city.” He added, “From the moment you enter the building, you will be taken to another time and space.”

View from concert hall MAD Architects’ China Philharmonic Hall for China Philharmonic Orchestra. (Courtesy MAD Architects)

View from concert hall MAD Architects’ China Philharmonic Hall for China Philharmonic Orchestra. (Courtesy MAD Architects)

Like many of MAD Architects’ recent projects, the building’s functional interior spaces—a 1,600-seat concert hall, a smaller 400-seat rehearsal hall, recording studio, library, gallery, offices, and rehearsal rooms—are all amassed together at the center of an otherwise airy and porous building. Flowing around the central building mass is a sinuous exterior facade made of translucent white panels that contain circulation and gathering spaces. The venue’s main concert hall is designed with a terraced seating arrangement made up of wooden platforms and is capped by a series of billowing white forms that are, according to the architects, inspired by the petals of the lotus flower. These surfaces will be used for projections during performances—all part of the effort to have a transformative effect on the venue’s harried urban occupants.

The project is scheduled to begin construction this year and is expected to be completed in 2019.

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