Under Construction> Early Childhood Center at Cincinnati Country Day School

Architecture In Construction Midwest News

Adding to an impressive portfolio of projects on Cincinnati Country Day School’s campus, Michael McInturf Architects (MMA) has completed designs for the private school’s latest addition: a 4-classroom house-like structure for 18-month to 3-year olds. The campus, 15 miles from downtown Cincinnati, includes a high school structure designed in collaboration with Greg Lynn circa 2001.

Since then, the firm has engaged in multiple rounds of masterplanning studies yielding a new elementary school, a sports pavilion, and a maintenance facility. MMA is also currently planning a major renovation to the campus athletic center and anticipates a completion date of late 2016 for this Early Childhood Center project.

(Courtesy Michael McInturf Architects)

(Courtesy Michael McInturf Architects)

The facility will include a sculptural playscape—an outdoor landscape that formally connects the school to its neighboring elementary school—and a nature trail for programmed outdoor activities.

(Courtesy Michael McInturf Architects)

(Courtesy Michael McInturf Architects)

The architects say this new “home” for Early Childhood education at Cincinnati Country Day will provide a “welcoming, fun and inspiring environment to house such a critical aspect of the campus experience.” While facilitating improved learning and safety for the newest members of the campus, the design seeks to reinforce a core value of the distinctive educational program: a connection to nature.

(Courtesy Michael McInturf Architects)

(Courtesy Michael McInturf Architects)

The design is informed by spatial equity, light, views, and play. A continuous “Ribbon Wall” weaves the spaces together to create a playful interaction between interior and exterior. The wall, formed from custom bent plywood, will be clad in a dark stained hardwood rainscreen. Roof monitors register four classroom spaces equally distributed radially around a central gathering space. The building is organized along a solar axis that maximizes natural daylight for each of the classroom spaces with respect to their most active use periods.

Construction is anticipated to be complete later this year.

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