Brooklyn-based landscape architecture firm Nomad Studio has designed a “kinetic living sculpture” for the Contemporary Art Museum of Saint Louis. The installation—dubbed Green Air—is the second half of a two part exhibition at the museum; this iteration features an array of Tillandsias (an evergreen plant) hanging from slices of repurposed wood. The undulating hanging garden partially diffuses light into an open space within the Museum.

According to a press release, Green Air was “conceived as a living, kinetic sculpture nested within the courtyard of the Contemporary Art Museum of Saint Louis.” The work is a reaction to Nomad’s previous installation, Green Varnish, which was an equally curvaceous landscape form that rose up from the ground at an angle. Dismantled last fall, the green fabric was made up of thousands of succulents that “symbolically covered all the inconvenient facts of our lifestyle.” (Green Varnish won last year’s Best of Design Award in the Temporary Installation category.)

In fact, Nomad said the space was “modeled as the inverse of Green Varnish, both in form and intention,” as it switched from an anchored solid to a free-hanging fluid volume. By doing so, the studio aimed to create a “continuity and dialogue between the two pieces and the people who experience them” as well as conjure up “urgent reflection upon the contrast between the dynamic and static in natural and man-made systems.”

Related Stories