Urban Beach

Escobedo Solíz Studio’s Weaving the Courtyard opens at MoMA PS1

Architecture East
(Courtesy of the architects and MoMA PS1. Photo by Pete Deevakul.)
(Courtesy of the architects and MoMA PS1. Photo by Pete Deevakul.)

This past Saturday inaugurated the MOMA PS1’s 19th Warm Up summer music series and its accompanying installation, the latter of which is appropriately dubbed Weaving the Courtyard. It was designed by Mexico City-based Escobedo Solíz Studio and its relatively simple design—at least compared to last year’s water-filtering giant—was selected as part of the museum’s Young Architects Program.

(Courtesy of the architects and MoMA PS1. Photo by Pete Deevakul.)

(Courtesy of the architects and MoMA PS1. Photo by Pete Deevakul.)

Weaving the Courtyard features all the “urban beach” amenities you would expect: a large reflecting pool, wooden plank walkways, a mist machine, and large sandy “beach” in the main courtyard. The installation’s brightly hued ropes plug into the formwork holes of the MoMA PS1‘s concrete walls.


(Courtesy of the architects and MoMA PS1. Photo by Pete Deevakul.)

(Courtesy of the architects and MoMA PS1. Photo by Pete Deevakul.)

With its use of humble materials, and its origins with a young Mexico City-based architects, the project’s simplicity and provenance definitely—by coincidence or otherwise—evokes Alejandro Aravena‘s “Reporting from the Front” theme for the Venice Biennale. While this reporter is concerned revelers will try to climb the ropes, in the meantime they certainly overlay a delightfully complex geometry over the courtyard’s views toward surrounding architecture and the sky.

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