Transient Transit

Designers offer transportation alternatives for NYC’s impending L train outage

East Transportation Urbanism
Transient Transit (Courtesy KPF)
Transient Transit (Courtesy KPF)

As the specter of the L train’s closure has become very real—it could last as long as three years—some alternatives have appeared from disparate sources. They include an East River Skyway cable car and a proposal to make 14th Street in Manhattan car-free.

The Van Alen Institute recently hosted an L Train Shutdown Charrette to encourage the generation of further ideas. Proposals had been whittled-down to six finalists. Each proposal was judged on accessibility, potential for economic development, financial feasibility, socioeconomic equity, disaster preparedness, and inventiveness by an audience, who subsequently voted for the winner.

Transient Transit(Courtesy KPF)

Transient Transit (Courtesy KPF)

The winning team was Dillon Pranger of Kohn Pedersen Fox who worked alongside Youngjin Yi of Happold Engineering; they suggested a water shuttle on Newtown Creek that would connect with the Long Island Railroad freight lines converted for passenger use.

Much like what Jim Venturi proposed last month for NYC and NJ rail travel, the pair’s idea makes use of infrastructure not currently utilized for public transit. Newton Creek was selected for its proximity to Greenpoint and Williamsburg, both popular stops for L-train commuters. Shuttles would also run from Manhattan to Dekalb Avenue and the North Williamsburg Ferry Pier.



Light at the End of the Tunnel (Courtesy AECOM)

Light at the End of the Tunnel (Courtesy AECOM)

Light at the End of the Tunnel (Courtesy AECOM)

Light at the End of the Tunnel (Courtesy AECOM)

As for the other submitted proposals, landscape architects Gonzalo Cruz and Garrett Avery, engineer Xiaofei Shen, and architectural intern Rayana Hossain proposed a 2,400-foot-long floating tunnel between Brooklyn and Manhattan for cyclists and pedestrians. Submitting for engineering firm AECOM, the team titled their proposal Light at the End of the Tunnel. The tunnel, which could be submerged or float above the water, be features a translucent skin. A “fast cart people-mover commuter system” would transport people through 14th Street and North 7th Street in Brooklyn on land.

Lemonade Line(Courtesy Jaime Daroca of Columbia University C-Lab; Nicolas Lee of Hollwich Kushner; Daniela Leon of Harvard GSD; and John Tubles of Pei Cobb Freed Architects)

Lemonade Line (Courtesy Jaime Daroca of Columbia University C-Lab; Nicolas Lee of Hollwich Kushner; Daniela Leon of Harvard GSD; and John Tubles of Pei Cobb Freed Architects)

Lemonade Line(Courtesy Jaime Daroca of Columbia University C-Lab; Nicolas Lee of Hollwich Kushner; Daniela Leon of Harvard GSD; and John Tubles of Pei Cobb Freed Architects)

Lemonade Line (Courtesy Jaime Daroca of Columbia University C-Lab; Nicolas Lee of Hollwich Kushner; Daniela Leon of Harvard GSD; and John Tubles of Pei Cobb Freed Architects)

Another submission, dubbed the Lemonade Line, came from John Tubles of Pei Cobb Freed Architects, Jaime Daroca of Columbia University C-Lab, Nicolas Lee of Hollwich Kushner, and Daniela Leon of Harvard GSD. The line aims to be “a multimodal transportation strategy that provides an all-access pass to seamlessly-linked buses, bikes, car-shares, and ferry lines following the L line above ground.” A mobile app would be developed for the program that could offer various routes depending on traffic.

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