Sea Train

New transit line links Downtown Los Angeles to the beach

City Terrain Transportation Urbanism West
Expo Train on its inaugural run (Courtesy Metro, Photo by Steve Hymon)
Expo Train on its inaugural run (Courtesy Metro, Photo by Steve Hymon)

For transit boosters and urbanists in Los Angeles, last weekend’s opening of the 6.6 mile extension to the city’s Expo Line linking Downtown Los Angeles with Santa Monica represents a capstone over a quarter century of hard-fought rail construction in a city notorious for its auto-dependent populace.

Passengers waiting for the Expo Train in Santa Monica (Courtesy Metro, Photo by Steve Hymon)

Passengers waiting for the Expo Train in Santa Monica (Courtesy Metro, Photo by Steve Hymon)

Los Angeles systematically dismantled its pre-World War II Red Car system in the post-war era and did not begin rebuilding its rail transit infrastructure until in the late 1980s. Metro opened the Blue line in 1990, a 22-mile light rail route linking Downtown Los Angeles with Long Beach. Since then, the system has grown exponentially, with two subway routes, four light rail lines, and two rapid bus lines completed since. Much of the recent expansion has been funded with money collected via sales tax increases. The Metro has another such initiative, Measure R2, on the November ballot this year aiming to help the agency continue its vigorous growth.

Expo Line train testing, May 2016. (Courtesy Metro, Photo by Steve Hymon)

Expo Line train testing, May 2016. (Courtesy Metro, Photo by Steve Hymon)

A first phase of the Expo Line opened in 2012 linking downtown to Culver City. The now-completed 15.2 mile route reestablishes rail transportation between the beach-adjacent westside communities and the region’s symbolic heart downtown by essentially reviving the route taken by the Pacific Electric Red Car service’s Air Line service that ran along the former Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe right of way between 1908 to 1953. The new line is expected to take around an hour end to end, about the same amount of time it takes to drive in good traffic.


Children celebrating at one of the Metro-sponsored station parties along the new route (Courtesy Metro, Photo by Steve Hymon)

Children celebrating at one of the Metro-sponsored station parties along the new route
(Courtesy Metro, Photo by Steve Hymon)

The Expo Phase II project was constructed via a design-build partnership between Skanska USA and Rados Construction Inc. and was administered by Expo Authority, the independent agency created by Metro to build the line. Skanska USA tapped Parsons Brinckerhoff to design the route’s tracks, stations, and bicycle facilities. Parsons Brinckerhoff also designed 24 at-grade and above-grade intersections for the line.

L.A.'s Updated Metro Rail map (Courtesy Metro)

L.A.’s Updated Metro Rail map (Courtesy Metro)

Celebrations took place at each of the seven new stations last weekend and Metro offered free fares on Friday and Saturday to commemorate the completion of the new line. The much-hyped weekend saw so many Angelenos flock to stops along the route that service got backed up as enthusiasts and skeptics alike rode rail transit to the beach for the first time in sixty years. But in perhaps a sign the difficulty Metro faces in changing L.A.’s car-dependent culture, service ground to a halt for nearly two hours Monday morning when a drunk driver drove onto the Expo Line’s tracks along an at-grade run of the line near downtown, snarling the line’s first weekday morning commute.

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