wHY will design a new Gagosian Gallery in San Francisco across from SFMOMA

Architecture Unveiled West
wHY's new Gagosian Gallery repurposes an existing brick building with a light touch

wHY’s new Gagosian Gallery repurposes an existing brick building with a light touch. (Courtesy Gagosian Gallery)

LA and San Francisco have always been in an arms race to see which city has more, or better, of everything. With the recent opening of LA’s Broad Museum and next month’s debut of the new SFMOMA, the stakes have never been higher. However, those proper art museums are facing competition for attention (and Instagram posts) from several major global art galleries setting up in the Golden State.

Los Angeles recently debuted a new Annabelle Selldorf-designed Hauser & Wirth outpost in that city’s booming Arts District. Now, not to let their So-Cal brethren have all the glory, San Francisco is rolling out the welcome mat for Gagosian’s recently-revealed gallery. Located in San Francisco’s downtown arts district, it will be designed by Kulapat Yantrasast, founder of LA and New York-based wHY

wHY proposes a spartan interior renovation for Gagosian's new San Francisco gallery

wHY proposes a spartan interior renovation for Gagosian’s new San Francisco gallery. (Courtesy Gagosian Gallery)

The new gallery is an old brick building owned and occupied by Crown Point Press, a longtime neighborhood gallery that focuses on displaying printmaking and etchings. It’s situated across the street from the soon-to-be-opened, Snohetta-designed expansion to Mario Botta’s original SFMOMA building. This new Gagosian certainly looks to fill a growing niche within Northern California’s wealthy, tech industry-driven, art-buying community. In reference to the decision to open this new gallery, Gagosian told the San Francisco Chronicle,“This makes sense with the new museum opening and with the emerging collector base in Silicon Valley.”

According to renderings provided to A/N by Gagosian, the new 4,500 square-foot design is organized as a traditional white-walled gallery. It features nothing more than a line of structural columns, some lateral bracing, and a skylight interrupting the otherwise minimal space. The historic building’s facade is being left untouched, save for new signage displaying the gallery’s name over the building entrance. The new gallery’s May 18 opening is timed to coincide with the debut of the new SFMOMA. The inaugural show will feature works on paper and sculpture by the likes of Cy Twombly, Richard Serra, and Pablo Picasso.

Related Stories