On View > Fellow Fellows at Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning

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BLDG_DRWG (Courtesy Cyrus Peñarroyo)

BLDG_DRWG (Courtesy Cyrus Peñarroyo)

University of Michigan’s Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning‘s Fellow Fellows exhibition, highlighting the work of its 2015-2016 Architecture Fellows, is set to open this Wednesday, March 23. 

Peñarroyo exhibited at the Chicago Artchitecture Biennale with his Lakefront Kiosk Competition Submission In collaboration with Grayson Cox and Anna Knoell (Courtesy Peñarroyo)

Peñarroyo exhibited at the Chicago Architecture Biennale with his Lakefront Kiosk competition submission, in collaboration with Grayson Cox and Anna Knoell. (Courtesy Peñarroyo)

Over the last year, the fellows spent their time in residence at Taubman developing their research projects while teaching three classes.

William Muschenheim Fellow Cyrus Peñarroyo‘s BLDG_DRWG  challenges both scale and order via hand-crafted imagery, employing tape, ink and paint, and post-creation digital manipulation. His “1:1 investigations” aim to re-establish “existing architectural conditions,” the results of which are used to construct a fragment of an unfinished building.

Ashley Bigham, the school’s Walter B. Sanders Fellow, presents Safety Not Guaranteed, which seeks to represent architecture as synonymous with conflict, war, and defense. In doing so, Bigham also searches to find an alternative to the phrase “defense architecture,” which only pertains to “fortresses, citadels, bastions and urban walls.”  The project views all architecture through the lens of paranoia, amplifying the sense of fear within the context of suburbia and domestic architecture.

The Architecture of Boundary, a 2012 work by Bigham also explored limitations within the perception of architecture (Courtesy Ashley Bigham)

The Architecture of Boundary, a 2012 work by Bigham also explored limitations within the perception of architecture (Courtesy Ashley Bigham)

Lastly, Willard A. Oberdick Fellow David Eskenazi‘s For the Trees questions the nature of paper-based architectural modeling. The many creations are merely forms, with no doors or windows to signify they are somehow meant to be a building. They raise questions like: What role do they have? Are they representations, replicas? Are they replicating each other? If so which is copying which? Further questioning inevitably follows: Is the viewer seeing the original, or the copy?

Fellow Fellows runs from March 24 through to April 30, 2016.

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