Two groups renew the effort to save the all-concrete Miami Marine Stadium

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The Miami Marine Stadium. (Courtesy Rick Bravo/National Trust for Historic Preservation)

The Miami Marine Stadium. (Courtesy Rick Bravo/National Trust for Historic Preservation)

Can decay on the Bay be forestalled? In 2014, a local group floated the idea of murals, and now, two nonprofits, the National Trust for Historic Preservation and Dade Heritage Trust, are renewing efforts to restore the Miami Marine Stadium on Biscayne Bay.

(Ines Hegedus-Garcia / Flickr)

Once a haven for boatwatchers, the stadium’s concrete surfaces now host a colorful array of graffiti. (Ines Hegedus-Garcia / Flickr)

Shuttered since 1992, both organizations have had their eyes on saving the seaside stadium for years. The National Trust listed the structure, built in 1963, on its annual 11 Most Endangered Historic Places in 2009, and declared it a National Treasure three years later. In a bid to cement its preservation in perpetuity, the stadium has been nominated for inclusion on the National Register of Historic Places. If approved, the cost of the restoration would be reduced by $6 million, as the project would qualify for federal historic tax credits.

(EL Gringo / Flickr)

(EL Gringo / Flickr)

To introduce attendees to the preservation cause, the Dade Trust and the National Trust will run an information kiosk at the Miami International Boat Show, in Virginia Key, from February 11 to 15. A petition that circulating there and online asks City of Miami commissioners to prioritize the stadium’s restoration this year.

Already, the city has created an advisory committee to decide on future directions for Virginia Key, which includes the restoration and reopening of the stadium. An RFQ for engineering and architectural services for the stadium is out, and so far Miami has spent more than $20 million on restoring land around the stadium.

(Ines Hegedus-Garcia / Flickr)

(Ines Hegedus-Garcia / Flickr)

Designed by Hilario Candela, a 27 year old Cuban architect, the all-concrete, 6,566 seat stadium was built to watch speedboat races. The roof, as long as a football field, was the longest span of cantilevered concrete in the world when it was built. The folded plate roof is anchored by eight concrete columns set back as far as physics would allow to afford almost unimpeded views of the bay.

(EL Gringo / Flickr)

(EL Gringo / Flickr)

To draw attention to their cause and highlight the stadium’s design, the National Trust will project vintage stadium footage in the evenings onto the structure this Friday through Sunday.

The stadium faces Virginia Key. (Google Maps)

The stadium faces Virginia Key. (Google Maps)

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