Sou Fujimoto and David Chipperfield among others tasked with “Reinventing Paris”

Architecture International
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“Pershing (17e)” (Courtesy Sou Fujimoto Architects)

As part of a master plan comprising 23 sites across ParisSou Fujimoto, David Chipperfield, and 20 others have been named as winners involved in responding the the Mayor’s call to “reinvent Paris.”

“A city like Paris must be able to reinvent itself at every moment in order to meet the many challenges facing it. Particularly in terms of housing and everything relating to density, desegregation, energy and resilience,” said Anne Hidalgo, Mayor of Paris. “It is important in today’s world to find new collective ways of working that will give shape to the future metropolis.”

The scheme was launched last year at the start of November, and has prompted many architects and developers to submit plans for the 23 sites across the city. Ranging from empty brownfield sites, polluted wastelands, classified mansions, office renovations, and train stations, Hidalgo’s plan has been hailed by many with French publication Talerma going so far as to call it a “stroke of genius.”

Despite the number of changes, one of the 23 sites, an 1880 neo-Gothic former Korean Embassy-turned-mansion has been left neglected. The judges deemed that no proposal (barely any were submitted) was worthy of construction and so the ageing structure will be left untouched on the Avenue De Villiers.

The old Massena station (Courtesy Petiteceinture)

The old Massena station (Courtesy Petiteceinture)

The same cannot be said for the Messana railway station, however. Given the unusual location and former typology, many were inspired to make it their own and judges were spoilt for choice. The winning submission came from Lina Ghotmeh DGT Architects who transformed the space into a healthy eating haven. Including a rooftop vegetable garden, a laboratory for agroecosystem research, gardening classrooms, residences for young chefs, bar, and, of course, restaurant.

A station transformed: "Power back to Massena." (Courtesy Lina Ghotmeh.DGT Architects)

A station transformed: “Power back to Massena.” (Courtesy
Lina Ghotmeh.DGT Architects)

Other notable winning submissions came from British architect David Chipperfield and Sou Fujimoto from Japan.

Morland, in the 4th arrondissement of Paris (Courtesy David Chipperfield Architects)

Morland, in the 4th arrondissement of Paris (Courtesy David Chipperfield Architects)

Working alongside Danish-Icelandic artist Olafur Eliasson, Chipperfield will “reinvent” the Immeuble Morland, a 164-foot tall once state-owned building that lies on the river Seine. The mixed-use program will include a swimming pool, ground floor food market, gym, a hotel, offices, a creche, youth hostel, and set aside 53,800 square feet for social housing. The top floor will also offer panoramic bar and restaurant.

sou fujimoto

“Pershing (17e)” (Courtesy Sou Fujimoto Architects)

Fujimoto, meanwhile, collaborated with revered French product designer Philippe Starck and Manal Rachdi of OXO Architectes. Fujimoto’s project will stretch across the Boulevard Périphérique, by the Palais des Congrès de Paris and offer what appears to be a densely packed green roof. Like Chipperfield, Fujimoto dedicated a large portion of his project to social housing. In fact, this will assume 30 percent of the development that will also offer office space, a community center, kindergarten, and play area.

The projects are set to cost over $1.46 billion and return $634 million in revenue to the city through the sale or long-term leasing of land. In addition to this, 2,000 over the course of three years are expected to be generated via construction alone.

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