Renzo Piano’s embattled “Paddington Pole” tower heads back to the drawing board

Architecture Development International News Newsletter Skyscrapers
Exterior Render. (Courtesy Renzo Piano)

Exterior Render. (Courtesy Renzo Piano)

Those who campaigned against Renzo Piano‘s cylindrical skyscraper in Paddington, London,  are celebrating a victory now that plans for the tower have been withdrawn from planning. The tower, dubbed the “Paddington Pole,” was set to top out 834 feet (72 floors) and rub shoulders with the Cheesegrater (The Leadenhall Building by Richard Rogers).

One of the many anti-pole posters (Courtesy SEBRA)

One of the many anti-pole posters (Courtesy SEBRA)

Developer Sellar Property Group, which also worked with Piano on the Shard skyscraper, claimed the cylindrical tower would change the way Paddington is viewed, with the public no longer seeing the area as a place to catch a train to the west country or visit someone at St. Mary’s Hospital.

However, Sellar Property Group was accused by residents of attempting to push the scheme through planning too quickly. Now, according to BDonline, founder Irvine Sellar has said that he considered concerns regarding “the height and impact of the tower element of the scheme on the local area.” This came after some “high level discussions” (no pun intended) with the leader and deputy leader of Westminster city council addressing the height issues. Sellar is supposedly keen to work with Piano on a revised design.

Sellar went on to note that the revisions “will bring forward an amended scheme that will still deliver all the substantial benefits including the significant investment in infrastructure and social housing.”

The 830-foot-tall scheme by Piano—who had previously said the only way to regenerate the area was to build a tall tower—had attracted fierce opposition with architects Terry Farrell and Ed Jones among hundreds who posted comments on the application. An online petition has attracted more than 1,800 signatures.

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One of the many anti-pole posters (Courtesy SEBRA)

Aside from opposition from architect Terry Farrell and local MP Karen Buck, one of the more prominent movements against the “Paddington Pole” was Historic England. “Tall buildings can be exciting and useful. But if they are poorly-designed, or in the wrong place, they can really harm our cities,” Historic England CEO Duncan Wilson told the Guardian. “We trust that the revised plans for Paddington Place will take the area’s unique character into account.”

“London’s skyline is unique, iconic and loved. It has to be managed sensitively and with proper planning,” he added. “Tall buildings can be exciting and useful, but if they are poorly designed, or in the wrong place, they can really harm our cities. We trust that the revised plans for Paddington Place will take the area’s unique character into account.”

Exterior Render. (Courtesy Renzo Piano)

Exterior Render. (Courtesy Renzo Piano)

The proposal had promised a new Bakerloo line ticket hall for at Paddington station, offices, restaurants, some 330 homes and a sky garden. It had the backing of Network Rail, Transport for London, St Mary’s Hospital, the NHS, and the Greater London Assembly. Still, Philippa Roe, leader of Westminster council, was pleased at the decision to withdraw plans.

“This is a very positive step and will allow time for us all to bring forward a development that enjoys broader community support and that we jointly believe will deliver enormous benefits to Westminster and London,” she told the Guardian. “We remain committed to ensuring that all the benefits of the original scheme are retained in the revised plans.”

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