Bjarke Ingels brings the park up to the tower in a new skyscraper at Hudson Yards

Architecture East News Unveiled
The Spiral. (Courtesy Tishman Speyer)

The Spiral. (Courtesy Tishman Speyer)

In a new Manhattan skyscraper, Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) reinterprets the tower-in-the-park by bringing the park up into the tower.

(Courtesy Tishman Speyer)

(Courtesy Tishman Speyer)

Today, the New York–based firm unveiled The Spiral, a 65-story skyscraper at Hudson Yards. The tower, programmed for offices and 27,000 square feet of retail, is located along the High Line, with a front entrance facing under-construction Hudson Park and Hudson Boulevard East.

For those tracking the recent explosion of supertalls, The Spiral, at 1,005 feet, is eye-level with 1,004-foot One57.

(Courtesy Tishman Speyer)

(Courtesy Tishman Speyer)

The prevailing visual element is a stepped group of terraces and hanging gardens, connected to double height atria, that wrap around the side of the building. For tenants renting out multiple floors, the atria can be programmed to connect to other floors, a tweak that could reduce reliance on elevators.

(Courtesy Tishman Speyer)

(Courtesy Tishman Speyer)

Storytelling plays a strong role BIG’s practice. The firm has a knack for delivering chronicles that distill the complexity of urban space and the ambiguities of history into a straightforward narrative that situates a project in time and place just so.

(Courtesy Tishman Speyer)

(Courtesy Tishman Speyer)

“The Spiral will punctuate the northern end of the High Line, and the linear park will appear to carry through into the tower, forming an ascending ribbon of lively green spaces, extending the High Line to the skyline,” asserted BIG founding principal Bjarke Ingels, in a statement. “The Spiral combines the classic Ziggurat silhouette of the premodern skyscraper with the slender proportions and efficient layouts of the modern high-rise. Designed for the people that occupy it, The Spiral ensures that every floor of the tower opens up to the outdoors creating hanging gardens and cascading atria that connect the open floor plates from the ground floor to the summit into a single uninterrupted work space. The string of terraces wrapping around the building expand the daily life of the tenants to the outside air and light.”

The Spiral will occupy a full block between Hudson Park, West 35th Street, 10th Avenue, and West 34th Street. (Google Maps)

The Spiral will occupy a full block between Hudson Park, West 35th Street, 10th Avenue, and West 34th Street. (Google Maps)

In a video accompanying today’s announcement, Ingels nails down the appeal of the swirl with pretty motifs from science and nature: “The spiral’s immaculate geometry, and its suggestion of the infinite, that has mesmerized us in all cultures, and across time and place.” The Spiral, he posits, will be “a new tower that stands out among its neighbors, yet feels completely at home.” As buildings should?

With BIG’s unveil, Phase 1 development is continuing apace at Hudson Yards. When complete, the new neighborhood will allow for 26 million square feet of office space, 20,000 units of new housing, three million square feet for hotels, and two million square feet of retail.

Hudson Yards first skyscraper, KPF’s 10 Hudson Yards, topped out last October, with construction on 15, 30, 35, 50, and 55 Hudson Yards well underway.

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