This 80-story kinetic skyscraper proposal for Dubai is back with a twist

Architecture International Skyscrapers
(Courtesy Dynamic Group, David Fisher)

(Courtesy Dynamic Group, David Fisher)

Dubai, a city famed for its taste in extravagant grandeur has become a playground for architects of late. Already home to many world firsts and record breakers, a new phenomenon in the form of an old idea may be on the horizon in the form of “Dynamic Tower,” an 80-story rotating skyscraper.

(Courtesy Dynamic Group, David Fisher)

(Courtesy Dynamic Group, David Fisher)

Originally proposed by architect David Fisher eight years ago in 2008, the structure could be completed by 2020 if everything goes according to a new plan, says Dynamic Group, the firm behind the concept.

Usually, when a firm claims to have conceived something as audacious as a “rotating tower,” they often refer to a little rooftop windmill, or the fact that the structure moves 0.01 inches in the wind. However, with Dynamic Group, this is not the case.

Dynamic Group’s proposal comes complete with a video (with requisite dramatic music and a Ferrari) showing off its masterpiece. Concepts for Moscow and Paris also feature in what the firm describes as a “new era of architecture.”

The tower aims to rise to a lofty 1,378 feet, which would make it the world’s second tallest residential tower behind New York’s 432 Park. Designers claim as many as 80 floors will be able to fully rotate on a central column.

(Courtesy Dynamic Group, David Fisher)

(Courtesy Dynamic Group, David Fisher)

It doesn’t stop there, either. According to What’s On, Dynamic Group said that floor rotation can be controlled via voice commands, providing, probably, the perfect way to wake that sleepy housemate up if all else fails.

Unsurprisingly, the skyscraper will host some wealthy occupants, offering many luxury apartments. Some 79 wind turbines will be used generate energy for the tower along with solar panels that will be laid on the roof of each floor as well as the top roof itself.

Fisher boldly claims that the tower would generate a surplus of power—enough “to power five other similarly sized buildings,” wrote What’s On. The designer also hopes to build 90 percent of the structure from prefabricated units.

Dynamic Group claim the project will cost (a rather precise) $3,299,770,550 though whether the tower is realised, or simply spins out of control remains to be seen.

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