This unit in Vinoly’s 432 Park skyscraper goes for baroque with interior design

East Interiors News
(Courtesy Atelier & Co)

(Courtesy Atelier & Co)

Love it or not, Rafael Viñoly‘s 432 Park makes a statement on the New York City skyline. The 88-story, 1,396-foot-tall skyscraper will be home to some of the world’s richest people (and/or their faceless LLCs). One soon-to-be-resident is bringing the public’s prying eyes inward by bucking the less-is-more aesthetic of contemporary interior design for a maximalist, marble-on-marble pad designed by Brooklyn–based Atelier & Co.

(Courtesy Atelier & Co)

(Courtesy Atelier & Co)

(Courtesy Atelier & Co)

(Courtesy Atelier & Co)

Atelier & Co. went for baroque with the design of a 4,000-square-foot residence on the tower’s 40th floor. The building’s structural tube design allows for open, no-column layouts, allowing residents to configure the space freely from a standard skyscraper layout.

(Courtesy DBox)

Rendering of the completed 432 Park tower. (Courtesy dbox)

(Courtesy Atelier & Co)

(Courtesy Atelier & Co)

Atelier & Co.’s plan removes the sitting room to create a combined dining and living area, divided only by a bookcase lifted from the set of Downton Abbey.

Meanwhile, the size of the master bathroom is doubled, presumably to accommodate the owner’s collection of marble busts, vases, or anachronistic glass globes.

(Courtesy Atelier & Co)

(Courtesy Atelier & Co)

Friedrichswerdersche Kirche in Berlin (Andreas Steinhoff / Wikimedia Commons

Schinkel’s Friedrichswerdersche Kirche in Berlin. (Andreas Steinhoff / Wikimedia Commons)

The colonnaded entryways, ornate wood floors, and coffered ceilings do right by Joan Rivers and Louis XIV. Atelier & Co. notes that the design was influenced by 19th century Prussian architect and painter Karl Friedrich Schinkel as well as Leo von Klenze, the German painter, writer, and architect.

The designers do recognize that their creation is inside a supertall, not Versaillies. They claim that the aesthetic draws on Viñoly’s geometry, perhaps in the patterning of the living room’s coffered ceiling.

Screen Shot 2016-01-21 at 4.41.25 PM

(Courtesy CTBUH)

As this monumental throwback interior takes shape, it’s a good time to note that the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat, the organization in charge of keeping tabs on the world’s supertalls, recently recognized 432 Park as the world’s 100th supertall. The tower clocks in as the second tallest building completed in 2015, per the organization’s numbers.

(Courtesy Atelier & Co)

(Courtesy Atelier & Co)

While living in this apartment may cause irreparable damage to your taste, that’s not the only danger it poses. A recent study in the Canadian Medical Association Journal suggests that living on a building’s upper floors increases the risk of dying from cardiac arrest.

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