Oslo plans to make its city center free from cars in four years

City Terrain Environment International Transportation Urbanism
Köpcentret Oslo City (Jenny Andersson, News Øresund / Flickr)

Köpcentret Oslo City (Jenny Andersson, News Øresund / Flickr)

Norway currently boasts three World Rally Championship drivers (second only to France), all of considerable pedigree, yet its capital city of Oslo is planning to remove cars for good. Along with the proposal to ban cars is the plan to build 37 miles worth of bike lanes by 2019 and a new system for handicap bus services and delivery vehicles.

Oslo's city lights (Tim A. Bruening / Flickr

Oslo’s city lights (Tim A. Bruening / Flickr)

In a bid to reduce pollution, Reuters reported, politicians in Oslo said they want to be the first European capital to implement a comprehensive permanent ban on cars. With a population just under 650,000, Oslo has around 350,000 cars with most owners living outside the center but inside the city’s boundaries.

Emulating Paris’ one day-a-year car ban, Oslo is bucking a trend many fellow European cities are following. Currently Brussels is trialling an eight month traffic circulation program involving the pedestrianization of its boulevards meanwhile the old cities of both Split and Dubrovnik in Croatia are completely car free.

Grensen, Oslo looking toward Oslo Domkirke (Oslo Cathedral). (Jonathan / Flickr)

Grensen, Oslo looking toward Oslo Domkirke (Oslo Cathedral). (Jonathan / Flickr)

Shop owners in Oslo, though, fear the plans will hurt business, though it is worthwhile noting that the city is not banning all vehicles, so delivery trucks and the like will be allowed. Lan Marie Nguyen Berg, lead negotiator for the Green Party in Oslo has said “We want to make it better for pedestrians, cyclists. It will be better for shops and everyone.”

Olso city in dark (Francis Norman / Flickr)

Olso city in dark (Francis Norman / Flickr)

The plan also outlines the need for significant investment in infrastructure, most notably in public transportation that will have to support the growing number of users. Trials will be run after authorities investigate precedents in other european cities where plans have so far been a success.

Aside from a marked reduction in pollution, the change will also make the city a much more appealing place for pedestrians and cyclists, something which the authorities are not alone in trying. According to Gemini, researchers from Scandinavian group SINTEF claim that much needs to be done about Norway’s noise problem which is responsible for 150 deaths a year.

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