Remember the Battery Park City wheatfield? Conceptual artist is back with a horticultural pyramid in Queens

Art City Terrain East Landscape Architecture On View
(Courtesy Socrates Sculpture Park)

The Living Pyramid. (Courtesy Socrates Sculpture Park)

[Editor’s Note: Socrates Sculpture Park on the Queens waterfront installed The Living Pyramid, a public sculpture by Agnes Denes in May, when this article was originally published. They have just announced that they will extend the life of the sculpture through the end of October. The work is Denes’ first since her iconic Wheatfield – A Confrontation in 1982, sited on a waterfront landfill in what is now Battery Park City in Lower Manhattan. Do not miss this chance to see this important artwork before it comes down next month.]

Monuments of pre-civilization feats in construction and engineering, pyramids are the latest muse of conceptual artist Agnes Denes who, in 1982, transformed what is now Battery Park City into a two-acre wheatfield.

Denes' 1982 exhibition, 'Wheatfield - A Confrontation' in Battery Park City

Denes’ 1982 exhibition, Wheatfield – A Confrontation, in Battery Park City.

Titled Wheatfield – A Confrontation and featuring the backdrop of a construction site and jostling Manhattan skyscrapers, it’s not difficult to surmise Denes’ intentions. Likewise, her latest project, Living Pyramid resonates with a rebellious call to the wild. Made from soil and thousands of seeds, the pyramid will be erected in late April at the Socrates Sculpture Park in Long Island City, Queens.

The Living Pyramid. (Courtesy Socrates Sculpture Park)

The Living Pyramid. (Courtesy Socrates Sculpture Park)

On May 17, the public is invited to plant the seeds, which, by early June, will have bloomed into wildflowers and leafy plants. Living Pyramid itself will remain on view until August 30, when cooler weather begins to encroach once again. The sculptural exhibition is Denes’ first major exhibition in the city since Wheatfield, although her work has been displayed at New York City’s prime museums including MoMA, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and the Whitney Museum.

(Courtesy Socrates Sculpture Park)

(Courtesy Socrates Sculpture Park)

“What [pyramids] all convey is the human drama, our hopes and dreams against great odds,” Denes said in a press release. “Transformed into blossoms, the pyramid renews itself as evolution does to our species.” Long a fixture in Denes’ work, pyramids are also central to her exhibition In the Realm of Pyramids: The Visual Philosophy of Agnes Denes on view at the Leslie Tonkonow Artworks + Projects from March 14–May 9.

'In the Realm of Pyramids: The Visual Philosophy of Agnes Denes' on view now (Courtesy Leslie Tonkonow Artworks + Projects)

‘In the Realm of Pyramids: The Visual Philosophy of Agnes Denes’ on view now (Courtesy Leslie Tonkonow Artworks + Projects)

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