You Know I’d Bike 1,000 Miles: New York City celebrates milestone achievement in bike infrastructure

City Terrain East News Transportation
Marking the 1,000th mile of bike lane on Clinton Street (Courtesy NYC DOT)

Marking the 1,000th mile on Clinton Street (Courtesy NYC DOT)

The New York City Department of Transportation (NYCDOT) announced this week that it has created 1,000 miles of bike lanes (map) across the five boroughs. The 1,000th mile, on which just opened along Clinton Street in Lower Manhattan, is one of twelve new miles planned for 2015.

City officials and transportation advocates make their way downtown on the newest bike lane (Courtesy NYC DOT)

City officials and transportation advocates make their way downtown on the newest bike lane (Courtesy NYC DOT)

Bicycle Route Map (Courtesy NYC DOT)

Bicycle Route Map (Courtesy NYC DOT)

Unsurprisingly, Brooklyn has the greatest stretch of dedicated bike lanes (310.7 miles), though Manhattan has the most lanes (around 122 miles) entirely separate from car traffic.

New York City’s 1997 Bike Master Plan called for 1,800 miles of bike lanes across the five boroughs. Current projects focus on creating safer streets, maintaining continuity between existing bike lanes, and meeting demand where ridership is high.

As part of the Vision Zero transportation safety initiative, Woodside, Queens, is getting protected bike lanes on Queens Boulevard (a.k.a. the Boulevard of Death) between 73rd Street and Roosevelt Avenue. As part of a Complete Streets program, an east-west bike lane along 165th Street in the Bronx will connect north-south routes in the borough. This year, after some delay, upgraded bike lanes came to the Pulaski Bridge. The bridge is a key conduit between Brooklyn and Queens that has seen its ridership more than double since 2009.

The full list of proposed and in progress bicycle route improvements in New York City can be found here.

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