Video> Shum Yip Land’s Peter Kok on green skyscrapers and keeping East Asia’s skylines unique

Architecture Development International News Skyscrapers Sustainability Urbanism
Shum Yip Upperhills in Shenzhen, China (© Shum Yip Land via Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat)

Shum Yip Upperhills in Shenzhen, China (© Shum Yip Land via Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat)

This Fall, I served as special media correspondent for the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat‘s September symposium in Shanghai. The topic was “Future Cities: Towards Sustainable Vertical Urbanism,” and among the many architects, engineers and other tall building types I interviewed was Peter Kok, associate general manager of Shum Yip Land, the commercial property arm of Shenzhen Investment.

Kok shared his thoughts (along with others at the conference) on how to avoid homogeneity among skylines worldwide. “The problem with all the new buildings, new hotels is people don’t recognize the city,” said Kok. “So I think we need to add some cultural elements to it.”

He mentioned incorporating local materials into new construction projects, as well drawing on local traditions of vernacular architecture. And, Kok said, nature should be part and parcel with high-tech urban skyscrapers.

“We should not only see nature,” said Kok. “We should be part of it and mingle with it so you can really enjoy nature in these high-rise buildings.”

Watch the full video interview embedded from YouTube, or here on CTBUH’s website, along with the rest of the videos in the series.

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