In a commentary against waste-producing lifestyles, Indian artist creates a sculpture made from 70,000 bottle caps

Art International Sustainability
(Courtesy Arunkumar HG)

(Courtesy Arunkumar HG)

Indian artist Arunkumar HG has created a somewhat tongue-in-cheek calling out of our throwaway, waste-producing lifestyles with a shoreline sculpture made from nearly 70,000 bottle screw caps. The artist amassed the collection from his neighborhood over the course of a year, carefully stacked the caps, and connected them in vertical configurations using steel filaments.

(Courtesy Arunkumar HG)

(Courtesy Arunkumar HG)

An undulating, horseshoe-like form resulted, resembling, from afar, a mosaic that is pleasant to behold courtesy of the various colors. “There is a huge imbalance in between our sustainable ecology and our contemporary living practices,” the artist told Designboom.

(Courtesy Arunkumar HG)

(Courtesy Arunkumar HG)

Titled Droppings and the Dam(n), the sculpture is made from bottle caps sourced from Arunkumar’s town of Gurgaon, India, to “map the consumption pattern of the society at the time” and show the scale of waste produced within a limited time period.

(Courtesy Arunkumar HG)

(Courtesy Arunkumar HG)

The sculpture was built for the most recent edition of “Sculpture by the Sea” in Aarhus, Denmark, a government-funded public arts project originating on Sydney’s world-famous Bondi beach.

(Courtesy Arunkumar HG)

(Courtesy Arunkumar HG)

“I have always loved large community arts events like ‘Opera in the Park’ and ‘Symphony Under the Stars’, especially the way total strangers sit next to each other listening to music while enjoying a picnic dinner and a few glasses of wine,” David Handley, founding director of Sculpture by the Sea, wrote in a post on the official website explaining the reason he started the initiative. “To me this sense of community is too rarely displayed or available in the modern world.” The month-long public art exhibition is Denmark’s largest visual arts event and typically attracts half a million visitors.

(Courtesy Arunkumar HG)

(Courtesy Arunkumar HG)

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