An architect from Vancouver wants to build the world’s tallest wooden skyscraper over a roadway in Paris

Architecture International Skyscrapers Sustainability
Baobab in Paris. (Courtesy Michael Green Architecture)

Baobab in Paris. (Courtesy Michael Green Architecture)

Back in March, AN wrote about Rüdiger Lainer and Partners’ plan to construct a wood skyscraper in Vienna. The so-called HoHo project would rise 276 feet and be about three-quarters wood. Now, Vancouver-based architect Michael Green, whose eponymous firm is behind “the tallest mass timber building in the United States” has proposed a timber tower for Paris that would be 10 stories taller—making it the tallest such structure on earth. That is, if it gets built.

The 35-story tower. (Courtesy Michael Green Architecture)

The 35-story tower. (Courtesy Michael Green Architecture)

The tower is part of a mixed-use scheme called “Baobab” that Michael Green Architecture (MGA), along with Paris-based DVVD and developer REI France, submitted to Réinventer Paris—a city-sponsored competition that asked architects to propose “innovative urban projects” at one of 23 sites across town. MGA and its teammates went with Pershing, an under-utilized site that the competition says “will be at the heart of the Porte Maillot renewal operation, a strategic part of Greater Paris, linking the central business district with La Défense.”

Along with the wood tower, which MGA says is carbon neutral, Baobab has a mix of market-rate and subsidized housing, a hotel for students, agricultural facilities, a bus station, and an e-car hub. The development would span across an eight-lane roadway.

“Our goal is that through innovation, youthful social contact and overall community building, we have created a design that becomes uniquely important to Paris,” said Michael Green, Principal of MGA, in a statement.  “Just as Gustave Eiffel shattered our conception of what was possible a century and a half ago, this project can push the envelope of wood innovation with France in the forefront. The Pershing Site is the perfect moment for Paris to embrace the next era of architecture.”

Shortlisted proposals are expected to be announced this summer, so we will have to wait until then to see if Baobab has a chance of taking shape.

Baobab in Paris. (Courtesy Michael Green Architecture)

Baobab in Paris. (Courtesy Michael Green Architecture)

[h/t CBC News]

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